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Lost Indian Magic

Lost Indian Magic

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Published by lipstea134

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Published by: lipstea134 on Sep 12, 2010
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10/31/2011

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CHAPTER ICHAPTER IICHAPTER IIICHAPTER IVCHAPTER VCHAPTER VICHAPTER VIIICHAPTER IXCHAPTER XCHAPTER XICHAPTER XIICHAPTER XIIICHAPTER XIVCHAPTER XVLOST INDIAN MAGICA MYSTERY STORY OF THE RED MAN AS HE LIVED BEFORE THE WHITE MAN CAMEBY GRACE AND CARL MOONAUTHORS OF "INDIAN LEGENDS IN RHYME"ILLUSTRATIONS AND DECORATIONS BY CARL MOONNEW YORK
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FREDERICK A. STOKES COMPANYPUBLISHERS
Copyright, 1918, by
FREDERICK A. STOKES COMPANY
 All Rights Reserved Printed in the United States of America
TO OUR MOTHERSMARY B. PURDIEANDL. NETTA MOONTHIS BOOK ISLOVINGLY DEDICATEDBY THE AUTHORSFOREWORDOut in the region of the sage and the pine; in the far reaches of the ever-mysterious desert, the Indiancampfires of the long ago heard many a tale well worth the telling. Some there were that have been handeddown, through the channel of an unwrit tongue, from age to youth -- told, retold, and told again until theycome to the hearing of even you and me. Thus the ancient tale of Kay'-yah and the Lost Magic comes to be setdown. It may be that the legend loses somewhat in parting with the strange tongue that gave it birth, but thethread on which the crude beads of its adventures are strung runs back even to the first account, and may be of the same spinning.THE AUTHORS.Pasadena, California, 1918.PROLOGUEPERHAPS the thing that, more than all else, governed the life and conduct of our American Indians, beforethe coming of the white man with his aggressive religious views, was superstition.Like all primitive peoples they personified the hidden powers of Nature, most of which were feared, and theysupposed that back of all disaster stood some evil intelligence that must be appeased, or fought, with the aid of some other power possessing greater virtue.Naturally enough, the power that, in their opinion, brought the greatest protection against evil, and producedthe greatest blessings in abundant crops, successful hunting, and strength in battle, was symbolized by someimage or object which took to itself the mighty power and gave out its magical charm, or great medicine, to
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the fortunate tribe who possessed it.All good fortune, great or small, was credited to its power. All evils were thought to be less vicious than theywould have been had the great Magic not been on duty in the medicine lodge, or hidden away on somesecluded altar. It was most jealously protected and regarded as the tribe's most priceless possession. Graduallysuch a tribal fetish would come to be looked upon as the vital link between the power of the gods and thehumble earth people; their charm against all the wiles of the witches, and evil spirits that were ruled over bythe chief of all trouble makers -- the Shin-di.Thus the people of Ah'-co, with whom our story deals, placed the highest earthly value upon a little carvenbear of turquoise -- their mighty Magic, handed down to them out of a mysterious past; an inheritance fromgenerations of their forefathers who had received its constant protection, and the blessings of its power forgood. Its fame spread abroad, and at last a powerful neighboring tribe began to covet it, and the unscrupulousyoung chief of the tribe laid careful plans to secure it by a subtle method of his own.One eventful night, five years before our story opens, the great Magic disappeared from the sacred altar of themedicine lodge of Ah'-co, and with its loss came the looked-for train of want, woe, and disaster. One heavyshadow lay upon the hearts of the men -- the loss of their Magic; one determination remained uppermost intheir minds -- its recovery.Seasons passed, bringing their varying fortune, and then dawned the day of Kay'-yah who, with ever constantfaith in Joho'-na-ai, the Great Spirit whose symbol was the sun, went forth to find the little blue bear andrestore it to his people.CONTENTSFOREWORDPROLOGUEI. THE THEFTII. THE WRONG BAGIII. KAY'- YAH AT TA-PAU'-WEEIV. THE HIDDEN PASSAGEV. DEE-NAY'S NARRATIVEVI. THE CAVE MANVII. A SECRET COUNCILVIII. THE MARK OF THE BEAR-WITCHIX. THE MAGIC SLEEPX. SAH'-NE IN THE "EAGLE'S NEST"XI. "BE'-TA-ATSIN"
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