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Open Distance learning

Open Distance learning

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Published by TahirAli

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Categories:Types, Brochures
Published by: TahirAli on Sep 12, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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12/13/2010

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Introduction
Open learning and self development
The term “open learning” was first used in the late 1970s to describe any provision of education and training that actively sought to identify, and thento remove, barriers preventing certain groups from learning. These barriersincluded those endemic in conventional delivery of managementdevelopment stick as time (courses beginning and ending at set times of theday or the year), place (courses requiring the learner to attend an institution frequently and regularly) and pace (all learnershaving to study at the same pace). More significantly, for the topic of thischapter, harriers of educational design were also identified. These includedrigid course structures, limiting learners’ choice of what can he studied andhow it can be studied; barriers of preset entry requirements; no learner choice of qualification; and lack of awareness or lack of confidence that mayinhibit an individual from even considering learning in the first place.. In the early phase of open learning the first set of mainly logistical barrierswas addressed: schemes such as the United Kingdom’s Open University andOpen Tech were designed to lessen or remove barriers of time, place and pace. Hence the importance of distance learning: through the provision of learning packages (mostly in printed form), management development could be delivered. more or less anywhere and individuals could study at any tinand at their own pace (see Keegan, 1986). in a distance-learning scheme, thecourse content is provided largely through specially designed materialssupplemented by a tutor with whom the learner has to communicate for mostof the time across a distance, by letter or telephone (or increasingly by e-mail), with only occasional face-to-face contact. This form of open learninguses a dissemination orientation. It is characterized by a relatively inflexiblesyllabus and course structure.As we shall see, distance learning and open learning are not synonymous.Some open learning schemes involve learners in easy and frequent face-to-
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face contact with the tutor and other learner’s and/or other supporters tolearning, such as line managers. Instead of a fixed syllabus, transmitted bymaterials, more open schemes allow greater learner participation inobjective-setting and ways of learning. In contrast to the disseminationorientation of distance learning, such schemes show The term “openlearning” was first used in the late 1970s to describe any provision of education and training that actively sought to identify, and then to remove, barriers preventing certain groups from learning. These barriers includedthose endemic in conventional delivery of management development stick astime (courses beginning and ending at set times of the day or the year), place(courses requiring the learner to attend an institution frequently and regularly) and pace (all learnershaving to study at the same pace). More significantly, for the topic of thischapter, harriers of educational design were also identified. These includedrigid course structures, limiting learners’ choice of what can he studied andhow it can be studied; barriers of preset entry requirements; no learner choice of qualification; and lack of awareness or lack of confidence that mayinhibit an individual from even considering learning in the first place.. In the early phase of open learning the first set of mainly logistical barrierswas addressed: schemes such as the United Kingdom’s Open University andOpen Tech were designed to lessen or remove barriers of time, place and pace. Hence the importance of distance learning: through the provision of learning packages (mostly in printed form), management development could be delivered. more or less anywhere and individuals could study at any tinand at their own pace (see Keegan, 1986). in a distance-learning scheme, thecourse content is provided largely through specially designed materialssupplemented by a tutor with whom the learner has to communicate for mostof the time across a distance, by letter or telephone (or increasingly by e-mail), with only occasional face-to-face contact. This form of open learninguses a dissemination orientation. It is characterized by a relatively inflexiblesyllabus and course structure.As we shall see, distance learning and open learning are not synonymous.Some open learning schemes involve learners in easy and frequent face-to-face contact with the tutor and other learners and/or other supporters tolearning, such as line managers. Instead of a fixed syllabus, transmitted bymaterials, more open schemes allow greater learner participation inobjective-setting and ways of learning. In contrast to the disseminationorientation of distance learning, such schemes show a developmentorientation. More recently open learning schemes have thus tackled theharriers of educational design, focusing on widening learner choice of what
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