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Writing for a Change

Writing for a Change

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Published by Patrick W. Berry
Writings from students in the Education Justice Project
Writings from students in the Education Justice Project

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Published by: Patrick W. Berry on Sep 17, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/29/2012

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FOR A CHANGE
SPRING 2009
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS • EDUCATION JUSTICE PROJECT • http://www.educationjustice.net/AN ANTHOLOGY PRODUCED BY STUDENTS IN THE WRITING FOR A CHANGE COURSEDANVILLE CORRECTIONAL CENTER
   L   A   R   R   Y   B   R   E   N   T ,   “   C  a  p  t  u  r  e   d   P  o  t  e  n  t   i  a   l   ”
WRITING
 
 Writing for a Change is a publication of the Education Justice Project of the University of Illinois. The works represented in this journal were produced by students in the Writing fora Change course at the Danville Correctional Center, Spring 2009, with the support of thecourse instructor, Patrick W. Berry, pberry2@illinois.edu. The contributions in this journalmay not be reproduced without authors’ consent. Queries may be made to Berry or to Re-becca Ginsburg, Director of the Education Justice Project, rginsbur@illinois.edu;http://www.educationjustice.net/
introductions and beginnings
03 Writing Back / Patrick W. Berry04 Our Hope for the Better / David D. Todd06 State of Depression / Johnny Page07 Captured Potential / Larry Brent
education for justice and community
10 We All Want the Same Things / Joseph Mingarelli14 Educational Freedom / Javon Grimes15 Can Education Change the Criminal Mind? / Jose R. Cabrales17 Support the Education Justice Project19 Options / Pierre Nero20 Universities / Haneef Lurry21 The Identity and Legacy Is Disappearing in the African-American Family / Fabian Harty23 Time Served Me / Johnny Page26 Working Together to Build a Community / Robert Garite
writing to remember
30 I Was Never Alone / Otis Carl Williams37 From Beneath the Porch...I Discovered I Couldn’t Hide / Terry Berry40 Travelin’ / Larry Brent42 In Search of a Story / Javon Grimes46 Letter to My Son / Joseph Mingarelli
composing oneself: writing on writing and education
49 Developing a Passion for Writing / Haneef Lurry52 The Intimidating Blank Page / Tremain Leggans54 Finding a Process / Robert Garite59 Creating Art Through Writing / Christopher Garner63 Why Higher Education in Prison?
WRITING
FOR A CHANGE
SPRING 2009
 
 writing for a change 3
Writing Back
Patrick W. Berry
 What follows is a collection of work by writers who are currently in prison, writers who aim to rewrite themselves back into anever-changing world. In the spring of 2009, I designed and taught“Writing for a Change: For Business, for Life,” a course that attendedto how we listen to the ideas of others and respond to the worldaround us as we write. Inspired by the Ethnography of the Univer-sity Initiative (EUI) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,the course invited writers to research prison life and craft a wide rangeof responses—from personal narratives to business proposals—all of  which imagined new ways of seeing and understanding the world. The contributions that follow have rich histories. Some pieces were carried around by the authors for some time just waiting for anaudience. Others were presented at a student-led symposium, attendedby university faculty and students, at the Danville Correctional Center. This journal extends that effort.I know that I speak for the writers whose work is includedin this journal when I say that we are grateful to the many whohave helped make a space for the Education Justice Project. Weapplaud Mary Nichols and thank the administrators and staff atthe Danville Correctional Center for their ongoing support. Big thanks to Rebecca Ginsburg, our director, and to the other com-mitted teachers including William Sullivan, Dan Colson, and DedeFairchild Ruggles. And, of course, we cannot forget the dedicatedtutors whose intelligence and compassion are evident on the pagesof this journal and off the page as well: Andy Bruno, Sarah Frohardt-Lane, Jason Derman, Anna Kurhajec, Rachel Rasmussen, VanessaRouillon, and Katie Walkiewicz. Special thanks also to Tracy Dace,Rob Scott, and those behind-the-scenes folks who do so much, andto my colleagues and friends at the University of Illinois, Cory Holding and John O’Connor, who helped me ready these pagesfor publication. Last but not least, we are extremely grateful to thedonors and contributors to the Education Justice Project.Enjoy! •

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