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Advice to Rāhula: Four Discourses of the Buddha

Advice to Rāhula: Four Discourses of the Buddha

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Discourses the Buddha gave to his son Rahula. Wheel Publication No. 33
Discourses the Buddha gave to his son Rahula. Wheel Publication No. 33

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Published by: Buddhist Publication Society on Sep 19, 2010
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Advice to RāhulaFour Discourses of the Buddha
Translated from the PaliWith an introduction
Edited by
 Nyanaponika Thera
Buddhist Publication SocietyKandy • Sri Lanka
The Wheel Publication No. 33
First published 19612
nd
Impression 1974BPS Online Edition © (2008)Digital Transcription Source: BPS Transcription ProjectFor free distribution. This work may be republished, reformatted, reprinted andredistributed in any medium. However, any such republication and redistribution is to bemade available to the public on a free and unrestricted basis, and translations and otherderivative works are to be clearly marked as such.
 
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Contents
Introduction............................................................................................................................3Acknowledgements...............................................................................................................5Introduction to the Ambalahikā-Rāhulovada Suttanta..................................................6Ambalahikā-Rāhulovada Suttanta (The Ambalahikā Exhortation to Rāhula).........6Introduction to the Mahā-Rāhulovada Suttanta................................................................9Mahā Rāhulovada Suttanta (The Great Exhortation to Rāhula)....................................10Cūa-Rāhulovada Suttanta (The Shorter Exhortation to Rāhula)..................................14The Rāhula Sutta (Sutta-Nipāta, Verses 335-342)............................................................16Notes......................................................................................................................................18
 
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Introduction
“A son has been born to thee, O prince!” this was the message that reached PrinceSiddhattha when returning from a drive through the city of Kapilavatthu and a day spent ata park near-by.“A fetter (Rāhula) has been born, a bondage has been born!” said the prince upon hearingthe news. And Rāhula was the name given later to the babe by Siddhattha’s father, the RājaSuddhodana.These were indeed unusual words with which to welcome a first-born; but we shallunderstand them better when we set them against the background of another experienceencountered by Siddhattha on that memorable day. We are told that it was on this very daythat Siddhattha met on his way, the serene figure of an ascetic—or, as some would have it,saw a vision of it. This encounter showed him a way of life that could help him to find, forhimself and mankind, the deliverance from the inflictions of old age, sickness and deathwhich had made such a strong impact on him when he had grasped their full significancenot long before during earlier outings.Now, the sight of a monk was to him as if a door had opened in the golden cage, for a birdthat longed for freedom. But the birth of his child threatened to close that door for himagain, and Siddhattha knew that he had to come to a decision this very day. At the end of those fateful hours which Siddhattha spent in the palace after his return, his mind wasfirmly set on his quest for the Deathless. The time of the Great Renunciation had come, itwas towards midnight that he went to the chambers of his wife, the Princess Yasodharā, tohave a last silent glance at her and his son. But the mother’s arm and hand enclosedprotectively Rāhula’s little head, and without having seen his child’s face, Siddhattha wentinto the night and started on a road that, after six years, led him to his goal, to fullenlightenment—Buddhahood.It was not yet a full year after his enlightenment that the Buddha visited his paternalhome, Kapilavatthu. During his stay there, while one day he was seated in the palace,Princess Yasodharā spoke to Rāhula: “This is thy father, Rāhula! Go and ask him for thyheritage!” Little Rāhula went and stood before the Enlightened One who was still seated,and exclaimed: “How pleasant is thy shadow, O ascetic!” The Master rose from his seat andwhen he had left the palace, Rāhula followed and, as told by his mother, spoke to him: “Giveme my heritage, O ascetic!” Thereupon the Master turned to his disciple Sāriputta and said:“Ordain him, Sāriputta.” Thus little Rāhula became a novice monk (
sāmaera
) at the age of seven. But henceforth, at the request of Rāja Suddhodana, no further
sāmaera
ordinationswere given without the parents’ consent.The Master took constant interest in Rāhula’s development and wisely guided himthroughout the years, until Rāhula, in his twenty first year, had attained to Sainthood(
arahatta
) and needed guidance no longer. The exhortations collected in these pages, are thegreater and the most important part of those handed-down to us in the Sutta Piaka of thePali Canon. About those not included here, some information will be given in the following:The
 first
of the texts translated here, the Exhortation to Rāhula given at Ambalahikā(Ambalahikā-Rāhulovāda Sutta), was spoken by the Buddha when Rāhula was seven yearsold. The discourse has two main subjects, truthfulness and mindfulness, which are indeedthe corner stones for building a character and for developing the faculties of mind. Aneducation based on the fostering of these two qualities, will indeed have secure foundations.

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