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Outdoor Structures

Outdoor Structures

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Published by Moseyspeed
Before building any outdoor structure near a neighbor's land, be sure you know exactly where your property lines lie. Start by studying the lot plat, or map, that was furnished with the title to the land. When mapping the land, the surveyors drove metal stakes into the ground at the corners of the plot to serve as property markers. If you can locate one of them, your property map and a little basic geometry will enable you to find the others. You can determine the boundaries by driving stakes n
Before building any outdoor structure near a neighbor's land, be sure you know exactly where your property lines lie. Start by studying the lot plat, or map, that was furnished with the title to the land. When mapping the land, the surveyors drove metal stakes into the ground at the corners of the plot to serve as property markers. If you can locate one of them, your property map and a little basic geometry will enable you to find the others. You can determine the boundaries by driving stakes n

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Published by: Moseyspeed on Sep 22, 2010
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Before building any outdoor structurenear a neighbor's land, be sure you knowexactly where your property lines lie.Start by studying the lot plat, or map, thatwas furnished with the title to the land.When mapping the land, the surveyorsdrove metal stakes into the ground at thecorners of the plot to serve as propertymarkers. If you can locate one of them,your property map and a little basicgeometry will enable you to find theothers. You can determine the boundariesby driving stakes next to the markers,then stretching string between the stakes.Once the boundaries are established,a few simple surveying techniques andtools will enable you to map the location
Tape measure
MaulShovel
Magnetic stud finderTransit levelWooden stakesTall polesPowdered chalkMason's lineClear plastic hose
and size of the structure you want tobuild. Distances can be measured fairlyaccurately with a mason's line, woodenstakes, and a carpenter's tape measure,but keep at least 12 inches from a property line when siting a structure to avoid accidentally straying onto a neighbor's land.To sight lines for pouring foundations, orto establish perfect parallels or right angles to property lines, use a transit level.
Before positioning or excavating trenches, find the locations of underground obstacles such as dry wells, septic tanks, and cesspools,and electric, water, and sewer lines.
Working from two known markers.
With a maul, drive a wooden stake next to a knownmarker. (Property markers may be lost in undergrowth or afew inches underground.)Attach a length of mason's line equal to the distance between the known marker and the lost marker, as indicatedon your property map.Mark an arc on the ground near the lost marker withpowdered chalk
(right).
Repeat the procedure at another known marker.Dig for the lost marker at the intersection of the arcs
(inset).
Working from a single marker.
Mark an arc on the ground with chalk over the approximatelocation of the hidden marker
(above).
Brush a magnetic stud finder along the arc
(left).
When thestud finder's needle deflects, dig for the marker. If the stud finderdoes not work, try using a metal detector. The final recourse isto call in a professional surveyor to reestablish the property lines.
 
Sighting a straightline over a hill.
Drive a stake at both thestarting and unseen points.Stand at one stake, stationa helper at the other, andhave two more helpers holdtall poles in between atpoints where the tops ofthe poles can be seen fromboth stake positions
(right and inset).
Sighting from your stake,signal the pole holder nearest you to move until thetwo poles are in a straightline from your view.Have the helper at theunseen point repeat theprocedure with the secondpole person.Alternate sightings untilthe poles appear in line from both positions.Connect the four points with mason's line.
Finding level points on a slope.
You can find a point on a stake or postthat is level with a mark on another byusing a water level or a clear plastichose partly filled with water.Make a mark at the desired
or 
known height on the first post.Position the hose between the postsas shown. Hold one end a few inchesabove the mark you have made andhave a helper hold the other end atabout the same height.Fill the hose with water until thelevel reaches the mark.Make sure there are no air bubbles—if there are, block and lower oneend to allow the bubble to rise tothe surface.Finally, mark the second post at thewater level in the hose
(left).

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