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Extraordinary Built Ins

Extraordinary Built Ins

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Published by jindi

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Published by: jindi on Mar 07, 2007
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/03/2013

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MAY/JUNE 2001
55
Photos: Anatole Burkin
few years ago, two women walked into my shop unan-nounced. One of them wasthe daughter of a client; the other washer interior designer. They were famil-iar with my furniture and asked whether I would consider makingbuilt-in cabinets for them. I said I wasnot doing cabinets anymore, just furni-ture. But the women said they didn’t want cabinets in the traditional sense.They were looking for built-ins thatlooked like high-quality furniture.My curiosity was piqued, because Ihad never done anything like this be-fore. Case-good construction and fur-niture making really are two separatedisciplines. Built-in cabinets generallyare utilitarian in nature. To keep costsunder control, the choice of materialsand construction follow certain predictable paths. For one, doorsoften are attached with large European-style hinges, and drawersare usually set on metal slides, all of which make for easier adjust-ment and faster construction. Cabinets usually are attached to walls with screws, and moldings, if any, are nailed in place.Fine furniture requires more handwork, such as hand-cut dove-tail joints, which are time-consuming and costly if done on a largescale. But furniture presents the builder (and client) with manymore options. The choices of materials are endless, and the designpossibilities vast. These are all the reasons why I got into furnituremaking and why I took on this commission.
Designing a bedroom from scratch
My mission was to create a refuge—a place to relax, reflect and re-energize. The homeowners are both avid readers and art collec-tors and demanded lots of storage and display space. Their wishlist included an entertainment/displaycenter, a corner cabinet, three slidingdoor screens, three large wardrobes,two bookcases and even some free-standing furniture: a platform bed andtwo nightstands. Aesthetically, theclients were after what they called acontemporary Asian feeling.”I looked for a traditional and histori-cal link that I could update and found itin a book on Japanese architecture. I was intrigued by a style of fence andgate that utilized a latticework pattern with decorative nails at the joints. Isketched out various ideas and cameup with a scaled-down version of thislatticework pattern, which could be re-peated throughout the room. Theclients liked the idea. The latticework, which is applied to all of the door pan-els, became the focal point of many of the pieces, both large andsmall and helped tie them all together visually.
 Top-quality materials make a difference
The clients requested that the primary wood be Japanese oak, atight-grained, honey-colored wood. Unfortunately, it isn’t availableanymore. I was, however, able to track down some old-growthquartersawn American white oak and quartersawn French oak ve-neer. These are lighter in color and finer in grain than typical whiteoak and turned out to be a good match. All of the boxes and panels were veneered medium-densityfiberboard (MDF). Edges were covered with solid, shopmadebanding, about
1
 ⁄ 
8
in. thick. Thicker edge-banding allowed me toease the corners and provided a durable surface. I also used solidmaple, primarily for drawer sides and backs. To keep shelves fromsagging, I first built up a core of a
3
 ⁄ 
4
-in. plywood surfaced on both
 
Extraordinary Built-ins
Case-good construction techniques and a furniture maker’ssensibility can take “cabineture” to new heights
BY ROSS DAY 
 A unifying theme.
Latticework is used on all of the cab- inet doors. Some intersecting members are pinned us- ing brass, colored an antique brown.
 A

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