Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
OIG Report

OIG Report

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1,894|Likes:
Published by tpmdocs

More info:

Published by: tpmdocs on Sep 23, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/24/2010

pdf

text

original

 
 U.S. Department of JusticeOffice of the Inspector GeneralEvaluation and Inspections Division
WORKING DRAFT REPORTReview of ATF’s Project GunrunnerSeptember 2010NOTICE -- THIS DRAFT RESTRICTED TO OFFICIAL USE ONLY
 This document is a
WORKING DRAFT
report prepared by the Office of theInspector General, U.S. Department of Justice. It has not been fullyreviewed within the Department and is, therefore, subject to revision.Recipients of this draft report must not show or release its contents forpurposes other than official review and comment.
LIMITED OFFICIAL USE ONLYA-2009-005
 
WORKING DRAFT
U.S. Department of Justice
i
 Office of the Inspector GeneralEvaluation and Inspections Division
WORKING DRAFTEXECUTIVE SUMMARY
 This review by the Department of Justice (Department) Office of theInspector General (OIG) examined the impact of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives’ (ATF) implementation of ProjectGunrunner on the illicit trafficking of guns from the United States toMexico.Violence associated with organized crime and drug trafficking inMexico is widespread, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths.In part because Mexican law severely restricts gun ownership, drugtraffickers have turned to the United States as a primary source of weapons,and these drug traffickers routinely smuggle guns from the United Statesinto Mexico. According to ATF officials, approximately 90 percent of theguns recovered in Mexico that have been traced were initially sold in theUnited States.
1
  The criminal organizations responsible for smuggling guns to Mexicoare typically also involved in other criminal enterprises, such as drugtrafficking, human trafficking, and cash smuggling. This requires ATF to work with other federal entities, as well as with state and local lawenforcement partners, in sharing intelligence, coordinating law enforcementactivities, and building cases that can be prosecuted. To help combat firearms trafficking into Mexico, ATF began ProjectGunrunner as a pilot project in Laredo, Texas, in 2005 and expanded it as anational initiative in 2006. Project Gunrunner is also part of theDepartment’s broader Southwest Border Initiative, which seeks to reducecross-border drug and firearms trafficking and the high level of violenceassociated with these activities on both sides of the border.In June 2007, ATF published a strategy document,
Southwest Border Initiative: Project Gunrunner 
(Gunrunner strategy), outlining four key
1
William McMahon, Deputy Assistant Director for Field Operations, ATF, before theCommittee on Homeland Security Subcommittee on Border, Maritime, and GlobalCounterterrorism, U.S. House of Representatives, concerning “Combating Border Violence: The Role of Interagency Coordination in Investigations” (July 16, 2009),http://homeland.house.gov/Hearings/index.asp?ID=205 (accessed August 25, 2010). Seealso, GAO,
Firearms Trafficking: U.S. Efforts to Combat Arms Trafficking to Mexico Face Planning and Coordination Challenges,
GAO-09-709 (June 2009), 15.

Activity (3)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->