Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Authenticity in Canadian Conservation Practice

Authenticity in Canadian Conservation Practice

Ratings: (0)|Views: 258|Likes:

More info:

Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOCX, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/20/2014

pdf

text

original

 
P
ROCEEDINGS OF THE
I
NTERAMERICAN
S
YMPOSIUM ON
A
UTHENTICITY
 
IN THE
C
ONSERVATION AND
M
ANAGEMENT OF
C
ULTURAL
H
ERITAGE
 
S
AN
A
NTONIO
,
 
T
EXAS
,
 
USA
 
M
ARCH
,
 
1996U
NITED
S
TATES
N
ATIONAL
C
OMMITTEE OF THE
I
NTERNATIONAL
C
OUNCIL ON
M
ONUMENTS AND
S
ITES
 C
OMITÉ
N
ATIONAL DES
E
TATS
U
NIS DU
C
ONSEIL
I
NTERNATIONAL DES
M
ONUMENTS ET DES
S
ITES
 
ICOMOS Canada
Authenticity in Canadian conservation practice
The paper which follows is a composite perspective on authenticity issues in Canadian conservation. Ithas been put together on the basis of contributions from many members of ICOMOS Canada, somesubmitted by invitation, other "borrowed". Contributions used in preparation of this paper come fromWayne Zelmer, Frank Rorvemaker (on the grain elevators of Saskatchewan), Susann Myers (on thereconstruction of Louisbourg), Walter Jamieson, Fergus Maclaren (on tourism), Alain Lafrenidre (onvernacular architecture and the City of Hul1), Susan Buggey (on cultursl landscapes), Christina Cameron(on transportation corridors), Gordon Bennett (on commemorative integrity), Michel Bonnette (onQuebec City and the restoration of Place Royale), Pierre LaRochelle (on I1e d, Orleans), ChristianeLefebvre (on definitions), Andrew Powter (on St. George,s Church, Halifax, and on the Library of Parliament), Dinu Bumbaru (on Montreal), Les Hurt and Jack Brink (on Head-Smashed-in-Buffalo Jump). Ihave very much appreciated the substantial contributions each has made in preparation of this paper. Iregret I have not been able to use a11 of the excellent material supplied; as well I should note that I beara11 responsibility for the interpretation, use and organisation of their materials.
 
Where published papers and complete notes have been supplied, I have quoted from them, and citedthe author. Where only rough point-form notes have been supplied, these have been re-phrased for usein the article with credit usually being limited to use of the contributors' name.
 
H. Stovel, OAA, MRAIC President, ICOMOS Canada
 
December, 1995
 
 
P
ROCEEDINGS OF THE
I
NTERAMERICAN
S
YMPOSIUM ON
A
UTHENTICITY
 
IN THE
C
ONSERVATION AND
M
ANAGEMENT OF
C
ULTURAL
H
ERITAGE
 
S
AN
A
NTONIO
,
 
T
EXAS
,
 
USA
 
M
ARCH
,
 
1996U
NITED
S
TATES
N
ATIONAL
C
OMMITTEE OF THE
I
NTERNATIONAL
C
OUNCIL ON
M
ONUMENTS AND
S
ITES
 C
OMITÉ
N
ATIONAL DES
E
TATS
U
NIS DU
C
ONSEIL
I
NTERNATIONAL DES
M
ONUMENTS ET DES
S
ITES
 
Introduction
 
The paper looks at how perceptions of authenticity (and therefore its utility inconservation practice) have altered over the last three decades in Canada. The paperdevelops this theme by looking at the treatment of authenticity questions within anumber of sites of heritage significance, important in defining Canadian culturalidentity. The treatment of the subject is necessarily limited, both by the smallnumber of heritage sites examined and by the author's personal biases andexperiences.
 
Authenticity is a measure of the essential truth of the values or messagescommunicated by cultural heritage as perceived by those in contact with them. Assuch, shifts in perception of authenticity reflect shifts in focus among professionalsand the public in defining significant messages and their related heritage values.
 
Authenticity, following the lines of argument developed in the Bergen and Naraauthenticity meetings, is also understood through the attributes of cultural heritage,since messages or values, as such, are not palpable: they cannot themselves betouched or viewed or experienced. Authenticity analysis for any particular sitedemands first identification of the particular attributes that support or carry thosevalues, and secondly, an assessment of the degree of truth, or genuineness, orcompleteness attached to these.
 
Authenticity has been expressed as a goal consistently throughout the developmentof conservation practice in Canada over the last 25 years. However, the objectiveslying behind use of the word are as varied as the perceived values it has been desiredto protect and enhance through conservation.
 
 
P
ROCEEDINGS OF THE
I
NTERAMERICAN
S
YMPOSIUM ON
A
UTHENTICITY
 
IN THE
C
ONSERVATION AND
M
ANAGEMENT OF
C
ULTURAL
H
ERITAGE
 
S
AN
A
NTONIO
,
 
T
EXAS
,
 
USA
 
M
ARCH
,
 
1996U
NITED
S
TATES
N
ATIONAL
C
OMMITTEE OF THE
I
NTERNATIONAL
C
OUNCIL ON
M
ONUMENTS AND
S
ITES
 C
OMITÉ
N
ATIONAL DES
E
TATS
U
NIS DU
C
ONSEIL
I
NTERNATIONAL DES
M
ONUMENTS ET DES
S
ITES
 
Canada, like all of the New World American states illustrates the efforts of transplanted, mostly-European cultural groups to subjugate the largely wildernesslands and native peoples they found, over the last several centuries. As well, eventhough identifiable heritage conservation practices may be described going back acentury or more in almost all of these countries, most of the significant growth inconservation theory, practice and capacity has taken place in the last thirty years -within the life of ICOMOS. An examination of shifting perceptions regarding heritagevalues in Canada and accompanying shifts in perceptions of 
 
"authentic" both illuminate some significant shared developmental trends and issueswithin the Americas, and the defining characteristics that characterize evolvingCanadian approaches to conservation.
 
Authenticity and accuracy: early reconstructions and restorations
 
"Authenticity" was very much a touchstone in my first encounters in the late 1970swith serious conservation practice in Canada. Having just spent two years studyingconservation in Edinburgh (in 1976- 1977, under Colin McWilliam, of Heriot-WattUniversity), I had been imbued with a form of what Michael Petzet of ICOMOSGermany has called "material fetishism" - reverence for the artefact as the singlelegitimate transmitter of heritage value. I soon discovered that most of my Canadiancolleagues had a different approach. When they spoke of authentic, they meant'accurate". Theirs was the world of the pedantic reconstruction, the painstakinglycorrect period restoration; their highly developed and well-supported research skillswere put to use in history, archaeology and architecture to uncover lost formsdeemed to be significant for Canadians. And what were these values?
 

Activity (2)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->