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The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper

The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper

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Published by Critteranne
Project Gutenberg's The Last of the Mohicans, by James Fenimore Cooper This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: The Last of the Mohicans A Narrative of 1757 Author: James Fenimore Cooper Illustrator: N. C. Wyeth Release Date: January 1, 2009 [EBook #27681] Language: English *** START O
Project Gutenberg's The Last of the Mohicans, by James Fenimore Cooper This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: The Last of the Mohicans A Narrative of 1757 Author: James Fenimore Cooper Illustrator: N. C. Wyeth Release Date: January 1, 2009 [EBook #27681] Language: English *** START O

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Project Gutenberg's The Last of the Mohicans, by James Fenimore CooperThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: The Last of the Mohicans A Narrative of 1757Author: James Fenimore CooperIllustrator: N. C. WyethRelease Date: January 1, 2009 [EBook #27681]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE LAST OF THE MOHICANS ***Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Greg Bergquist and theOnline Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.netTranscriber's NoteThe punctuation and spelling from the original text have been faithfullypreserved. Only obvious typographical errors have been corrected. _The_ LAST _of the_ MOHICANS A NARRATIVE OF 1757 [Illustration] _by_ JAMES FENIMORE COOPER _Illustrated by_ N.C. Wyeth "_Mislike me not for my complexion, The shadowed livery of the burnished sun._" NEW YORK CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS 1933
 
 _Copyright, 1919, by Charles Scribner's Sons_ ILLUSTRATIONS FACING PAGE UNCAS SLAYS A DEER 26 Avoiding the horns of the infuriated animal, Uncas darted to his side, and passed his knife across the throat THE BATTLE AT GLENS FALLS 66 Each of the combatants threw all his energies into that effort, and the result was, that both tottered on the brink of the precipice THE FIGHT IN THE FOREST 114 The battle was now entirely terminated, with the exception of the protracted struggle between Le Renard Subtil and Le Gros Serpent THE MEETING OF THE GENERALS 166 As soon as this slight salutation had passed, Montcalm moved towards them with a quick but graceful step, baring his head to the veteran, and dropping his spotless plume nearly to the earth in courtesy THE FLIGHT ACROSS THE LAKE 214 The scout having ascertained that the Mohicans were sufficient of themselves to maintain the requisite distance, deliberately laid aside his paddle, and raised the fatal rifle THE TERMAGANT 250 Throwing back her light vestment, she stretched forth her long skinny arm, in derision THE MASQUERADER 268 The grim head fell on one side, and in its place appeared the honest, sturdy countenance of the scout THE LOVERS 278 Heyward and Alice took their way together towards the distant village of the Delawares THE SUPPLICANT 320 Cora had cast herself to her knees; and, with hands clenched in each other and pressed upon her bosom, she remained like a
 
 beauteous and breathing model of her sexTHE LAST OF THE MOHICANSTHE LAST OF THE MOHICANSCHAPTER I "Mine ear is open, and my heart prepared: The worst is worldly loss thou canst unfold: Say, is my kingdom lost?" SHAKESPEARE.It was a feature peculiar to the colonial wars of North America, thatthe toils and dangers of the wilderness were to be encountered beforethe adverse hosts could meet. A wide and apparently an imperviousboundary of forests severed the possessions of the hostile provinces ofFrance and England. The hardy colonist, and the trained European whofought at his side, frequently expended months in struggling against therapids of the streams, or in effecting the rugged passes of themountains, in quest of an opportunity to exhibit their courage in a moremartial conflict. But, emulating the patience and self-denial of thepractised native warriors, they learned to overcome every difficulty;and it would seem that, in time, there was no recess of the woods sodark, nor any secret place so lovely, that it might claim exemption fromthe inroads of those who had pledged their blood to satiate theirvengeance, or to uphold the cold and selfish policy of the distantmonarchs of Europe.Perhaps no district throughout the wide extent of the intermediatefrontiers can furnish a livelier picture of the cruelty and fiercenessof the savage warfare of those periods than the country which liesbetween the head waters of the Hudson and the adjacent lakes.The facilities which nature had there offered to the march of thecombatants were too obvious to be neglected. The lengthened sheet of theChamplain stretched from the frontiers of Canada, deep within theborders of the neighboring province of New York, forming a naturalpassage across half the distance that the French were compelled tomaster in order to strike their enemies. Near its southern termination,it received the contributions of another lake, whose waters were solimpid as to have been exclusively selected by the Jesuit missionariesto perform the typical purification of baptism, and to obtain for it thetitle of lake "du Saint Sacrement." The less zealous English thoughtthey conferred a sufficient honor on its unsullied fountains, when theybestowed the name of their reigning prince, the second of the house ofHanover. The two united to rob the untutored possessors of its woodedscenery of their native right to perpetuate its original appellation of"Horican."[1]Winding its way among countless islands, and imbedded in mountains, the

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