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King Solomon's Mines by H Rider Haggard

King Solomon's Mines by H Rider Haggard

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Published by Critteranne
The Project Gutenberg EBook of King Solomon's Mines, by H. Rider Haggard This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: King Solomon's Mines Author: H. Rider Haggard Posting Date: January 15, 2009 [EBook #2166] Release Date: October 11, 2005 Language: English *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENB
The Project Gutenberg EBook of King Solomon's Mines, by H. Rider Haggard This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: King Solomon's Mines Author: H. Rider Haggard Posting Date: January 15, 2009 [EBook #2166] Release Date: October 11, 2005 Language: English *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENB

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of King Solomon's Mines, by H. Rider HaggardThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.netTitle: King Solomon's MinesAuthor: H. Rider HaggardPosting Date: January 15, 2009 [EBook #2166]Release Date: October 11, 2005Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK KING SOLOMON'S MINES ***Produced by John Bickers and Dagny. HTML version by Al Haines.KING SOLOMON'S MINESbyH. RIDER HAGGARDDEDICATIONThis faithful but unpretending recordof a remarkable adventureis hereby respectfully dedicatedby the narrator,ALLAN QUATERMAIN,to all the big and little boyswho read it.PREPARER'S NOTEThis was typed from a 1907 edition published by Cassell andCompany, Limited.
 
AUTHOR'S NOTEThe author ventures to take this opportunity to thank his readersfor the kind reception they have accorded to the successiveeditions of this tale during the last twelve years. He hopes thatin its present form it will fall into the hands of an even widerpublic, and that in years to come it may continue to affordamusement to those who are still young enough at heart to love astory of treasure, war, and wild adventure.Ditchingham,11 March, 1898.POST SCRIPTUMNow, in 1907, on the occasion of the issue of this edition, I canonly add how glad I am that my romance should continue to pleaseso many readers. Imagination has been verified by fact; the KingSolomon's Mines I dreamed of have been discovered, and are puttingout their gold once more, and, according to the latest reports,their diamonds also; the Kukuanas or, rather, the Matabele, havebeen tamed by the white man's bullets, but still there seem to bemany who find pleasure in these simple pages. That they maycontinue so to do, even to the third and fourth generation, orperhaps longer still, would, I am sure, be the hope of our old anddeparted friend, Allan Quatermain.H. Rider Haggard.Ditchingham, 1907.INTRODUCTIONNow that this book is printed, and about to be given to the world, asense of its shortcomings both in style and contents, weighs veryheavily upon me. As regards the latter, I can only say that it does notpretend to be a full account of everything we did and saw. There aremany things connected with our journey into Kukuanaland that I shouldhave liked to dwell upon at length, which, as it is, have been scarcelyalluded to. Amongst these are the curious legends which I collectedabout the chain armour that saved us from destruction in the greatbattle of Loo, and also about the "Silent Ones" or Colossi at the mouthof the stalactite cave. Again, if I had given way to my own impulses, Ishould have wished to go into the differences, some of which are to mymind very suggestive, between the Zulu and Kukuana dialects. Also a fewpages might have been given up profitably to the consideration of theindigenous flora and fauna of Kukuanaland.[1] Then there remains themost interesting subject--that, as it is, has only been touched onincidentally--of the magnificent system of military organisation inforce in that country, which, in my opinion, is much superior to thatinaugurated by Chaka in Zululand, inasmuch as it permits of even morerapid mobilisation, and does not necessitate the employment of thepernicious system of enforced celibacy. Lastly, I have scarcely spokenof the domestic and family customs of the Kukuanas, many of which are
 
exceedingly quaint, or of their proficiency in the art of smelting andwelding metals. This science they carry to considerable perfection, ofwhich a good example is to be seen in their "tollas," or heavy throwingknives, the backs of these weapons being made of hammered iron, and theedges of beautiful steel welded with great skill on to the iron frames.The fact of the matter is, I thought, with Sir Henry Curtis and CaptainGood, that the best plan would be to tell my story in a plain,straightforward manner, and to leave these matters to be dealt withsubsequently in whatever way ultimately may appear to be desirable. Inthe meanwhile I shall, of course, be delighted to give all informationin my power to anybody interested in such things.And now it only remains for me to offer apologies for my blunt way ofwriting. I can but say in excuse of it that I am more accustomed tohandle a rifle than a pen, and cannot make any pretence to the grandliterary flights and flourishes which I see in novels--for sometimes Ilike to read a novel. I suppose they--the flights and flourishes--aredesirable, and I regret not being able to supply them; but at the sametime I cannot help thinking that simple things are always the mostimpressive, and that books are easier to understand when they arewritten in plain language, though perhaps I have no right to set up anopinion on such a matter. "A sharp spear," runs the Kukuana saying,"needs no polish"; and on the same principle I venture to hope that atrue story, however strange it may be, does not require to be deckedout in fine words.Allan Quatermain.[1] I discovered eight varieties of antelope, with which I waspreviously totally unacquainted, and many new species of plants, forthe most part of the bulbous tribe.--A.Q.CONTENTSI I MEET SIR HENRY CURTISII THE LEGEND OF SOLOMON'S MINESIII UMBOPA ENTERS OUR SERVICEIV AN ELEPHANT HUNTV OUR MARCH INTO THE DESERTVI WATER! WATER!VII SOLOMON'S ROADVIII WE ENTER KUKUANALANDIX TWALA THE KINGX THE WITCH-HUNTXI WE GIVE A SIGNXII BEFORE THE BATTLEXIII THE ATTACKXIV THE LAST STAND OF THE GREYSXV GOOD FALLS SICKXVI THE PLACE OF DEATHXVII SOLOMON'S TREASURE CHAMBERXVIII WE ABANDON HOPEXIX IGNOSI'S FAREWELLXX FOUND

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