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Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar by Edgar Rice Burroughs

Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar by Edgar Rice Burroughs

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Published by Critteranne
Project Gutenberg's Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar, by Edgar Rice Burroughs This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar Author: Edgar Rice Burroughs Release Date: June 23, 2008 [EBook #92] Language: English *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK TARZAN AND
Project Gutenberg's Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar, by Edgar Rice Burroughs This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar Author: Edgar Rice Burroughs Release Date: June 23, 2008 [EBook #92] Language: English *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK TARZAN AND

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Project Gutenberg's Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar, by Edgar Rice BurroughsThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.netTitle: Tarzan and the Jewels of OparAuthor: Edgar Rice BurroughsRelease Date: June 23, 2008 [EBook #92]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK TARZAN AND THE JEWELS OF OPAR ***Produced by Judith Boss. HTML version by Al Haines.Tarzan and the Jewels of OparByEdgar Rice BurroughsContentsCHAPTER1 Belgian and Arab2 On the Road to Opar3 The Call of the Jungle4 Prophecy and Fulfillment5 The Altar of the Flaming God6 The Arab Raid7 The Jewel-Room of Opar8 The Escape from Opar9 The Theft of the Jewels10 Achmet Zek Sees the Jewels11 Tarzan Becomes a Beast Again12 La Seeks Vengeance13 Condemned to Torture and Death
 
14 A Priestess But Yet a Woman15 The Flight of Werper16 Tarzan Again Leads the Mangani17 The Deadly Peril of Jane Clayton18 The Fight For the Treasure19 Jane Clayton and The Beasts of the Jungle20 Jane Clayton Again a Prisoner21 The Flight to the Jungle22 Tarzan Recovers His Reason23 A Night of Terror24 Home1Belgian and ArabLieutenant Albert Werper had only the prestige of the name he haddishonored to thank for his narrow escape from being cashiered. Atfirst he had been humbly thankful, too, that they had sent him to thisGodforsaken Congo post instead of court-martialing him, as he had sojustly deserved; but now six months of the monotony, the frightfulisolation and the loneliness had wrought a change. The young manbrooded continually over his fate. His days were filled with morbidself-pity, which eventually engendered in his weak and vacillating minda hatred for those who had sent him here--for the very men he had atfirst inwardly thanked for saving him from the ignominy of degradation.He regretted the gay life of Brussels as he never had regretted thesins which had snatched him from that gayest of capitals, and as thedays passed he came to center his resentment upon the representative inCongo land of the authority which had exiled him--his captain andimmediate superior.This officer was a cold, taciturn man, inspiring little love in thosedirectly beneath him, yet respected and feared by the black soldiers ofhis little command.Werper was accustomed to sit for hours glaring at his superior as thetwo sat upon the veranda of their common quarters, smoking theirevening cigarets in a silence which neither seemed desirous ofbreaking. The senseless hatred of the lieutenant grew at last into aform of mania. The captain's natural taciturnity he distorted into astudied attempt to insult him because of his past shortcomings. Heimagined that his superior held him in contempt, and so he chafed andfumed inwardly until one evening his madness became suddenly homicidal.He fingered the butt of the revolver at his hip, his eyes narrowed andhis brows contracted. At last he spoke."You have insulted me for the last time!" he cried, springing to hisfeet. "I am an officer and a gentleman, and I shall put up with it nolonger without an accounting from you, you pig."The captain, an expression of surprise upon his features, turned towardhis junior. He had seen men before with the jungle madness uponthem--the madness of solitude and unrestrained brooding, and perhaps atouch of fever.
 
He rose and extended his hand to lay it upon the other's shoulder.Quiet words of counsel were upon his lips; but they were never spoken.Werper construed his superior's action into an attempt to close withhim. His revolver was on a level with the captain's heart, and thelatter had taken but a step when Werper pulled the trigger. Without amoan the man sank to the rough planking of the veranda, and as he fellthe mists that had clouded Werper's brain lifted, so that he sawhimself and the deed that he had done in the same light that those whomust judge him would see them.He heard excited exclamations from the quarters of the soldiers and heheard men running in his direction. They would seize him, and if theydidn't kill him they would take him down the Congo to a point where aproperly ordered military tribunal would do so just as effectively,though in a more regular manner.Werper had no desire to die. Never before had he so yearned for lifeas in this moment that he had so effectively forfeited his right tolive. The men were nearing him. What was he to do? He glanced aboutas though searching for the tangible form of a legitimate excuse forhis crime; but he could find only the body of the man he had socauselessly shot down.In despair, he turned and fled from the oncoming soldiery. Across thecompound he ran, his revolver still clutched tightly in his hand. Atthe gates a sentry halted him. Werper did not pause to parley or toexert the influence of his commission--he merely raised his weapon andshot down the innocent black. A moment later the fugitive had tornopen the gates and vanished into the blackness of the jungle, but notbefore he had transferred the rifle and ammunition belts of the deadsentry to his own person.All that night Werper fled farther and farther into the heart of thewilderness. Now and again the voice of a lion brought him to alistening halt; but with cocked and ready rifle he pushed ahead again,more fearful of the human huntsmen in his rear than of the wildcarnivora ahead.Dawn came at last, but still the man plodded on. All sense of hungerand fatigue were lost in the terrors of contemplated capture. He couldthink only of escape. He dared not pause to rest or eat until therewas no further danger from pursuit, and so he staggered on until atlast he fell and could rise no more. How long he had fled he did notknow, or try to know. When he could flee no longer the knowledge thathe had reached his limit was hidden from him in the unconsciousness ofutter exhaustion.And thus it was that Achmet Zek, the Arab, found him. Achmet'sfollowers were for running a spear through the body of their hereditaryenemy; but Achmet would have it otherwise. First he would question theBelgian. It were easier to question a man first and kill himafterward, than kill him first and then question him.So he had Lieutenant Albert Werper carried to his own tent, and thereslaves administered wine and food in small quantities until at last theprisoner regained consciousness. As he opened his eyes he saw thefaces of strange black men about him, and just outside the tent thefigure of an Arab. Nowhere was the uniform of his soldiers to be seen.

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