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Committee Oversight Gov Reform Doc

Committee Oversight Gov Reform Doc

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02/22/2015

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U.S. House of Representatives
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform
Darrell Issa (CA-49), Ranking Member
A Constitutional Obligation:Congressional Oversight of the Executive Branch
 S
TAFF
EPORT
 U.S.
 
H
OUSE OF
EPRESENTATIVES
 111
TH
 
C
ONGRESS
 C
OMMITTEE ON
O
VERSIGHT AND
G
OVERNMENT REFORM
 S
EPTEMBER 
22,
 
2010
 
 2
TABLE OF CONTENTS
A Constitutional Obligation: Congressional Oversight of the Executive Branch ….…3A Need Greater Now Than Ever – Vigorous Oversight of an Expanding Executive …... 4Congressional Democrats in the Minority – Support for Aggressive Oversight of theExecutive Branch ……………………………………………………………………….. 4A Democratic Majority in Congress and a Republican White House – ContinuedSupport for Aggressive Oversight ……………………………………………………… 6Democratic One-Party Rule: Congressional Democrats’ Abandonment of itsOversight Obligations …………………………………………………………………... 7Oversight Neglected by the Democratic Majority in the 111th Congress ……………… 12Conclusion ……………………………………………………………………………… 16
 
 3
Quite as important as legislation is vigilant oversight of administration
.
– Woodrow Wilson,
Congressional Government 
, 1885
A Constitutional Obligation: Congressional Oversight of the Executive Branch
Hand-in-hand with the powers expressly granted to Congress by the Constitution – among others, to legislate, to appropriate funds, to declare war, to raise armies, and toimpeach – is the implicit responsibility to perform rigorous oversight of the ExecutiveBranch.
1
As one historian noted, “it was not considered necessary to make an explicitgrant of such authority. The power to make laws implied the power to see whether theywere faithfully executed.”
2
 Both the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 (P.L. 79-601), which directedHouse and Senate Committees to “exercise continuous watchfulness” over ExecutiveBranch programs under their jurisdiction, and the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970(P.L. 91-510), which authorized committees to “review and study, on a continuing basis,the application, administration and execution” of laws,
3
have codified the oversight powers of Congress.Moreover, the U.S. Supreme Court has recognized this Congressional power onnumerous occasions. For example, the Court held that “the power of inquiry – with process to enforce it – is an essential and appropriate auxiliary to the legislative function.… A legislative body cannot legislate wisely or effectively in the absence of informationrespecting the conditions which the legislation is intended to affect or change, and wherethe legislative body does not itself possess the requisite information -- which notinfrequently is true -- recourse must be had to others who do possess it.”
4
Further, in
Watkins v. United States
, Chief Justice Warren wrote for the majority:We start with several basic premises on which there is general agreement.The power of Congress to conduct investigations is inherent in thelegislative process. That power is broad. It encompasses inquiriesconcerning the administration of existing laws as well as proposed or  possibly needed statutes. It includes surveys of defects in the social,economic, or political system for the purpose of enabling Congress toremedy them. It comprehends probes into departments of the federalgovernment to expose corruption, inefficiency, or waste.
5
 
1
CRS Report R41079,
Congressional Oversight: An Overview
, by Walter J. Oleszek, 2010.
2
Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. and Roger Burns, eds.,
Congress Investigates: A Documented History, 1792-1974
, vol. I (New York: Chelsea House, 1975), p. xix.
3
CRS Report 97-936,
Congressional Oversight 
, by Frederick M. Kaiser, 2006.
4
McGrain v. Daugherty, 273 U.S. 135 (1927).
5
Watkins v. United States, 354 U.S. 178, 187 (1957).

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