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47531

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Published by: trcongchi on Oct 01, 2010
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03/19/2014

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Wind Power Today
2010
WIND AND WATER POWER PROGRAM
 BUILDING A CLEAN ENERGY ECONOMY ADVANCING WIND TURBINE TECHNOLOGY SUPPORTING SYSTEMS INTERCONNECTION GROWING A LARGER MARKET
 
CONTENTS
BUILDING A CLEAN ENERGY ECONOMY ........................2ADVANCING LARGE WIND TURBINE TECHNOLOGY .....7SMALL AND MID-SIZED TURBINE DEVELOPMENT ......15SUPPORTING GRID INTERCONNECTION .....................17GROWING A LARGER MARKET ....................................23ENSURING LONG-TERM INDUSTRY GROWTH ..............31
2
WIND AND WATER POWER PROGRAM
WIND POWER TODAY
BUILDING A CLEAN ENERGY ECONOMY
Building a Green Economy
In 2009, more wind generation capacity was installed in the United States than in any previous year despite difficult economic conditions. The rapid expansion of the wind industry underscores the potential for wind energy to supply 20% of the nation’s electricity by the year 2030 as envisioned in the 2008 Department of Energy (DOE) report
 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy’s Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply.
 Funding provided by DOE, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act), and state and local initiatives have all contributed to the wind industry’s growth and are moving the nation toward achieving its energy goals. Wind energy is poised to make a major contribution to the President’s goal of doubling our nation’s electricity generation capacity from clean, renewable sources by 2012. The DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy invests in clean energy technologies that strengthen the economy, protect the environment, and reduce dependence on foreign oil. Within that office, the Wind and Water Power Program manages the public’s investment in wind power technology to improve the performance, lower the cost, and accelerate the deployment of wind power.
Built in 2009, the 63-megawatt Dry Lake Wind Power Project is Arizona’s first utility-scale wind power project.
The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program is to focus the passion, ingenuity, and diversity of the nation to enable rapid expansion of clean, affordable, reliable, domestic wind power to  promote national security, economic vitality, and environmental quality.
 
3
WIND AND WATER POWER PROGRAM
WIND POWER TODAY
Another Record Year for Wind
In 2009, the U.S. wind industry installed 10,010 megawatts (MW) of generating capacity, breaking U.S. installation records for the third year in a row. Wind power represented 39% of all U.S. electric generation capacity additions for the year. According to the American Wind Energy Association, the wind capacity added in 2009 generates enough electricity to power the equivalent of 2.4 million homes—the generation capacity of three large nuclear power plants. The entire wind turbine fleet in place at year’s end—more than 35,000 MW—was enough to power the equivalent of nearly ten million homes. This wind power capacity will avoid an estimated 62 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO
2
) emissions annually, equivalent to taking 10.5 million cars off the road, and will conserve about 20 billion gallons of water each year that would otherwise be withdrawn for steam or cooling in conventional power plants.The renewable energy industry creates thousands of long-term, high-technology careers in wind turbine component manufacturing, construction and installation, maintenance and operations, legal and marketing services, transportation and logistical services and more. In 2009, the wind sector invested $17 billion in the U.S. economy and employed 85,000 workers. A modern wind turbine has more than 8,000 component parts. To supply this market, 39 manufacturing facilities were brought online, announced, or expanded in 2009, bringing the total number of wind turbine component manufacturing facilities now operating in the United States to more than 200.Over half of the wind power generating capacity added in 2009 was installed in Texas, Indiana, and Iowa. Texas is home to the Roscoe Wind Plant, the world’s largest wind generation plant. After a construction period of just over two years, Roscoe has 627 wind turbines with an installed capacity of 780 MW that can generate electricity for more than 230,000 homes. Thirty-six states now have commercial wind energy systems installed. Arizona inaugurated its first large-scale wind plant, the 64-MW Dry Lake Wind Power Project, in 2009.The market for small wind turbines (rated capacity of less than 100 kilowatts) grew by 15% in 2009, adding 20 MW of generating capacity to the nation. Seven small wind turbine manufacturing facilities were opened, announced or expanded in 2009.
A National Strategy
The DOE Wind Program leads the federal government’s efforts to expand domestic wind energy capacity. According to the
 20% Wind Energy by 2030
 report, supplying 20% of our nation’s electrical demand with wind energy by 2030 is technically feasible and would reduce greenhouse gas emissions, create jobs, stimulate economic activity, and reduce water use. Generating 20% of the nation’s electricity from wind would require increasing the nation’s wind generating capacity from today’s 35 gigawatts (GW) to 300 GW of capacity over the next twenty years.The report found that achieving 20% wind energy by 2030 would provide significant economic and environmental benefits, including:Roughly 500,000 jobs in the United States with an annual average of more than 150,000 workers directly employed by the wind industry;More than 100,000 jobs in associated industries (e.g., steel workers, electrical manufacturing, accountants, and lawyers);More than 200,000 jobs through economic expansion based on local spending;An increase in annual property tax revenues to more than $1.5 billion by 2030;An increase in annual payments to rural landowners of more than $600 million in 2030;Avoidance of approximately 825 million metric tons of CO
2
 emissions in the electric sector;A reduction in water consumption by 4 trillion gallons in the electric sector. The report also identified major challenges along the path to a 20% wind scenario. The nation’s institutions need to:Invest in the nation’s transmission system so that the electricity generated by wind power can be delivered to urban centers that need the increased supply;Develop larger electric load balancing areas, in tandem with better regional planning, so that regions can depend on a diversity of generation sources including wind power;
300250200150100500Capacity needed by 2010 to meet 20% scenario by 2030 = 26 GWCumulative installed Capacity as of December 2009 = 35 GW
   C   u   m   u   l   a   t   i   v   e   I   n   s   t   a   l   l   e   d   C   a   p   a   c   i   t   y   (   G   W   )
20% Wind Scenario
305 GW200020062012201820242030Offshore 2009 = 0Land-based 2009 = 35 GW2009 = 35 GW
This 20% wind scenario graph shows how the total capacity installed by the end of 2009 compares to the capacity needed by 2010 to meet 20% wind by 2030 (1 GW=1,000 MW).

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