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Urination During Open Water Swimming

Urination During Open Water Swimming

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Published by Steven Munatones
An explanation of how athlete urinate during open water swimming.

For more information on open water swimming:
http://www.openwatersource.com
http://www.dailynewsofopenwaterswimming.com
http://www.imshof.org
http://www.10Kswim.com
An explanation of how athlete urinate during open water swimming.

For more information on open water swimming:
http://www.openwatersource.com
http://www.dailynewsofopenwaterswimming.com
http://www.imshof.org
http://www.10Kswim.com

More info:

Published by: Steven Munatones on Oct 01, 2010
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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10/19/2010

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Open Water Source 
 
www.openwatersource.com
 
Copyright © 2009 by Steven Munatones p.
1
 
Urination During Open Water Swimming
 hydrate before getting in the water. Then, they continue to hydrate while they are in the water, whether it is in training, during a race or in the middle of a soloswim.Like many young swimmers in a pool, 
 often feel the need to relievethemselves.Physiologically, it is natural to feel the need to relieve ourselves in the water for a variety of reasons: a full bladder, warm water or the excitement of the challenge.The Daily News of Open Water Swimming asked dozens of  
 severalquestions about this topic that everyone knows about, but does not often discusses:
1. Have you ever felt the need to urinate while swimming in the open water?  2. If so, how often: every time, frequently, occasionally or rarely?  3. Have you relieved yourself while swimming in the open water? 4. Is it difficult or easy for you to relieve yourself in the open water?  5. How exactly do you relieve yourself? 6. Have you ever NOT relieved yourself even though you felt a need? If so, why? 7. After your swim or race, do you feel the need to relieve yourself? 
Their answers
male or female, young or older
were quite similar whether or not theindividual was a marathon swimmer or a short-distance swimmer (i.e., under 5K). Notsurprisingly, nearly everyone does it - or has felt the need to do it.For most swimmers, a reduction in their kick is all it takes. Some swimmers go from a four- orsix-beat kick down to a two-beat kick and urinate without any problems. Other swimmersneed to stop kicking and concentrate while they let their legs drag. Others completely drop of their hips or stop altogether and go vertical to urinate. A few cannot go at all due to either cold water or the proximity of a support crew or officials of the opposite gender.
,an avid open water swimmer, tells us that the bladder can hold upto about 500 ml of urine. Generally, humans start to want to urinate after the bladder reachesthe 200-250 ml range.Cold-water swimmer 
,who swims in the cold San Francisco Bay, raisedthe issue of urinating in cold water which can be difficult. "
Your whole body is tightening up from the cold, so relaxing the required muscles requires effort. Plus, you are still working toswim forward and to generate heat. The effort of the initial 'starting to go' phase requires at least a slowing down of forward propulsion activities, if not outright cessation [in somecases] 
." As 
 explains, "
Urine comes from the blood via the kidneys [so] it is nice and warm. Probably warmer than the blood of a swimmer who is fighting hypothermia. Kind of 

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