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Results of professor's 12 years of self-experimentation

Results of professor's 12 years of self-experimentation

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Published by Carolyn
Berkeley Professor uses himself as his own guinea pig to test hypotheses on the correlations between behavioral choices and mood, weight, and energy levels.
Berkeley Professor uses himself as his own guinea pig to test hypotheses on the correlations between behavioral choices and mood, weight, and energy levels.

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Published by: Carolyn on Apr 26, 2007
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05/08/2014

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University of California
Postprints 
Year 

Paper 

Self-experimentation as a source of newideas: Ten examples about sleep, mood,health, and weight
Seth Roberts
University of California, Berkeley
Seth Roberts, “Self-experimentation as a source of new ideas: Ten examples about sleep,mood, health, and weight” (2004). Behavioral and Brain Sciences. 27 (2), pp. 227-288.Postprint available free at: http://repositories.cdlib.org/postprints/117Posted at the eScholarship Repository, University of California.http://repositories.cdlib.org/postprints/117
 
Self-experimentation as a source of newideas: Ten examples about sleep, mood,health, and weight
Abstract
Little is known about how to generate plausible new scientific ideas. Soit is noteworthy that 12 years of self-experimentation led to the discovery of several surprising cause-effect relationships and suggested a new theory of weightcontrol, an unusually high rate of new ideas. The cause-effect relationships were:(1) Seeing faces in the morning on television decreased mood in the evening (
>
10hrs later) and improved mood the next day (
>
24 hrs later), yet had no detectableeffect before that (0–10 hrs later). The effect was strongest if the faces werelife-sized and at a conversational distance. Travel across time zones reduced theeffect for a few weeks. (2) Standing 8 hours per day reduced early awakening andmade sleep more restorative, even though more standing was associated withless sleep. (3) Morning light (1 hr/day) reduced early awakening and made sleepmore restorative. (4) Breakfast increased early awakening. (5) Standing andmorning light together eliminated colds (upper respiratory tract infections) formore than 5 years. (6) Drinking lots of water, eating low-glycemic-index foods,and eating sushi each caused a modest weight loss. (7) Drinking unflavoredfructose water caused a large weight loss that has lasted more than 1 year. Whilelosing weight, hunger was much less than usual. Unflavored sucrose water hada similar effect. The new theory of weight control, which helped discover thiseffect, assumes that flavors associated with calories raise the body-fat set point:The stronger the association, the greater the increase. Between meals the setpoint declines. Self-experimentation lasting months or years seems to be a goodway to generate plausible new ideas.
 
Mollie:
There has to be a beginning for everything, hasn’t there?
The Mousetrap,
Agatha Christie (1978)
1.Introduction
1.1. Missing methods 
Scientists sometimes forget about idea generation. “Howodd it is that anyone should not see that all observation mustbe for or against some view if it is to be of any service,” wroteCharles Darwin to a friend (Medawar 1969, p.11). But where did the first views come from, if not observation? Ac-cording to a diagram in the excellent textbook
Statistics for Experimenters
(Box et al. 1978), the components of “datageneration and data analysis in scientific investigation”(p.4) are “deduction,” “design,” “new data,” and so on. Sci-entific investigation, the diagram seems to say, begins whenthe scientist has a hypothesis worth testing. The book saysnothing about how to obtain such a hypothesis.It is not easy to come up with new ideas worth testing,nor is it clear how to do so. Table 1 classifies scientific meth-ods by goal (generate ideas or test them) and time of appli-cation (before and during data collection or afterwards).The amount written about idea generation is a small frac-tion of the amount written about idea testing (McGuire1997), and the amount written about what to do before andduring data collection is a small fraction of the amount writ-ten about what to do afterwards –so the empty cell in Table1, on how to collect data that generate ideas, is no surprise.Although scientific creativity has been extensively studied(e.g., Klahr & Simon 1999; Simonton 1999), this researchhas not yet suggested new tools or methods. EvenMcGuire, who listed 49 “heuristics” (p.1) for hypothesisgeneration, had little to say about data gathering.Hyman (1964) believed that “we really do not knowenough about getting ideas even to speculate wisely abouthow to encourage fruitful research” (p.28), but 40 yearslater this is not entirely true. Exploratory data analysis(Tukey 1977) helps reveal unexpected structure in data, andsuch discoveries often suggest new ideas worth studying.Table 1 includes only those methods useful in many areasof science, omitting methods with limited applicability BEHAVIORAL AND BRAIN SCIENCES(2004)
27,
227–288
Printed in the United States of America
©
2004 Cambridge University Press0140-525X/04 $12.5
227
Self-experimentation as a source of new ideas: Ten examples about sleep,mood, health, and weight
Seth Roberts
Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley,Berkeley, CA94720-1650.
roberts@socrates.berkeley.edu
 Abstract:
Little is known about how to generate plausible new scientific ideas. So it is noteworthy that 12 years of self-experimentationled to the discovery of several surprising cause-effect relationships and suggested a new theory of weight control, an unusually high rateof new ideas. The cause-effect relationships were: (1) Seeing faces in the morning on television decreased mood in the evening (>10 hrslater) and improved mood the next day (>24 hrs later), yet had no detectable effect before that (0–10 hrs later). The effect was strongestif the faces were life-sized and at a conversational distance. Travel across time zones reduced the effect for a few weeks. (2) Standing 8hours per day reduced early awakening and made sleep more restorative, even though more standing was associated with less sleep. (3)Morning light (1 hr/day) reduced early awakening and made sleep more restorative. (4) Breakfast increased early awakening. (5) Stand-ing and morning light together eliminated colds (upper respiratory tract infections) for more than 5 years. (6) Drinking lots of water, eat-ing low-glycemic-index foods, and eating sushi each caused a modest weight loss. (7) Drinking unflavored fructose water caused a large weight loss that has lasted more than 1 year. While losing weight, hunger was much less than usual. Unflavored sucrose water had a sim-ilar effect. The new theory of weight control, which helped discover this effect, assumes that flavors associated with calories raise thebody-fat set point: The stronger the association, the greater the increase. Between meals the set point declines. Self-experimentationlasting months or years seems to be a good way to generate plausible new ideas.
Keywords:
breakfast; circadian; colds; depression; discovery; fructose; innovation; insomnia; light; obesity; sitting; standing; sugar
Seth Roberts
is an Associate Professor in the De-partment of Psychology at the University of Californiaat Berkeley. He is a member of the University’s Centerfor Weight and Health.His research includes follow-upof the results reported in this article, especially the weight and mood results, and study of how things beginin another situation – the generation of new instrumen-tal behavior by rats and pigeons.

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