Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
11Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
13564370 Multiple WingT Playbook Doc

13564370 Multiple WingT Playbook Doc

Ratings: (0)|Views: 316 |Likes:
Published by bdschlot

More info:

Published by: bdschlot on Oct 04, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/25/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Multiple Wing-T OffenseTable of ContentsChapter 1……………………………..Offensive LineChapter 2……………………………..Running BacksChapter 3……………………………..Split EndsChapter 4……………………………..Offense BasicsChapter 5……………………………..FormationsChapter 6……………………………..MotionsChapter 7……………………………..20 SeriesChapter 8……………………………..30 SeriesChapter 9……………………………..40 SeriesChapter 10……………………………80 SeriesChapter 11……………………………Passing GameChapter 12……………………………On SeriesChapter 13……………………………I FormationChapter 14……………………………Split Back SetChapter 15……………………………Bronco FormationChapter 16……………………………CincoChapter 17……………………………Short Yardage and Goal lineChapter 18……………………………2 Minute OffenseChapter 19……………………………4 Minute OffenseChapter 20……………………………Screen PassesChapter 21……………………………Practice PlanChapter 22……………………………Conclusion
 
Chapter 1Offensive Line
The most vital and underappreciated part of any football team is the offensive line.The true meaning of teamwork and sacrifice lies in the play and positions of the offensiveline. They do not get to touch the ball; therefore they do not get a chance to score. Their names will not be repeated over the stadium loudspeaker over and over again. In thenewspaper, when a back has a great individual performance, the line gets maybe one or two lines describing their efforts, but not the gushing praise that the back receives. Thatis why this is chapter one in this book. Good, solid offensive lines have made average backs look good and great backs even better. Case in point, the NCAA’s second all timeleading rusher, R.J. Bowers ran for more yards as a high school junior than he did as asenior. The reason is because his line as a junior was senior dominated. In 2002, theUniversity of Louisville Cardinal football team was mediocre because of average line play in a season when they were expected to win their conference and bowl game andfinish in the national top 10, they finished 7-6. Emmitt Smith had 5 All Pro’s on hisoffensive line. Eric Dickerson went to Indianapolis and went from super human to aboveaverage because of a lack of talent on his offensive line. I hope that I have made my point about the importance of a good offensive line. Ask any coach who has won and hewill tell you I am sure that he had a good group of linemen. High school is no differentthan the NFL in that it all starts up front. Some coaches feel that they need big earthmovers to make their system work, some like small, quick fullback-types, what ever your  preference, it is vital that they are smart and fundamentally sound.In this offense we prefer the smaller quicker types but there are three things that welook for in any lineman regardless of size. First we want tough players up front. The bottom line is that you need to have guys who are willing to go nose to nose with anopponent and just be flat out tougher than him. Running backs are trying to run awayfrom the defense, linemen are looking to hit the defense so they have to be tough.Second, we want them to be smart. These guys have to be able to make decisions andadjustments within seconds that determine the outcome of every play. In the time that ittakes a quarterback to say Red…..Set Go, a lineman has to decide who to block, how, andwhere. There are so many decisions that need to be made and made correctly before thesnap of the ball. Third, we want athletes up front. The days of the fattest, slowest kids being able to be effective offensive linemen are essentially over. Footwork, speed, andeye-hand coordination are vital to offensive line play. These requirements however arenot indicative of smaller linemen either; today’s athletes are getting bigger, faster, andstronger We begin teaching our linemen the basics of a good even stance:1.Feet shoulder width2.Toes pointed straight ahead3.Knees should not be bowed in4.Flat bac5.Head up
 
6.Even weight distribution7.Finger tips on the ground not the palm or knuckles of the hand8.Rest the off hand on the SIDE of the knee not on top.a.Take the palm of the hand and put it directly on the side of the kneeA coach should be able to slap the down hand away and the body should not teeter inthe least. Also if a player has a hard time with his knees bowing in, then you need tospend a little extra time with this player to help correct this. When a lineman is in a goodstance, he should look even and solid with no indication of his movements at the snap.When the play is called the center will go out first to set the line. The rest of thelineman will set themselves according to him. These are the alignment techniques:1.Splits should be at least 3 feeta.Splits that are closed down also close down the defense2.The guard, tackle, and tight end should have their ear hole aligned to thecenters hip or belt.a.This does set the other lineman back a little, but that is necessary to provide the angles and spacing needed to execute their blocks b.It is vital to check how deep the seat of a lineman is so we avoid theflying V formation and get called for too many men in the backfieldAfter we have taught them how to line up, then we can teach them how to move and block. Our base blocking rule is Fire – On – Backer. This rule can be applied to almostevery situation and while wing-t purists will no doubt disagree with a one rule system, Ihave found that it can work because it basically says the same thing as all of those blocking rules, but it puts it in one small package. Here is what the rule means:1.Fire: The fire part of our rule maintains our theory of angle blocking. Firesimply means that you are to block down when your rule calls for it. Your firegap, is your inside gap. The fire rule down block is applied on any level onedefender who is aligned from your inside shoulder down the nose of the nextlineman to your inside2.On: On blocking is done with a right or left shoulder block on any level onedefender who is lined up from shoulder to shoulder on you. I know what your 

Activity (11)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
tot- liked this
Coach G liked this
Coach G liked this
tot- liked this
tot- liked this
jgill33 liked this
jgill33 liked this
jgill33 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->