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Making for a More Positive Future-The Role of International Education in International Relations by Comp, 2008

Making for a More Positive Future-The Role of International Education in International Relations by Comp, 2008

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Published by David Comp

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Published by: David Comp on Jul 10, 2008
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05/09/2014

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Making for a More Positive FutureThe Role of International EducationIn International Relations
David CompSenior Adviser for International Initiatives in The CollegeThe University of Chicago
 
 
Making for a More Positive FutureThe Role of International Education In International Relations
Education is a slow-moving but powerful force.It may not be fast enough or strong enough tosave us from catastrophe, but it is the strongestforce available for that purpose and in its proper place, therefore, is not at the periphery, but atthe center of international relations. 
- J. William Fulbright
 
 
Making for a More Positive FutureThe Role of International Education In International Relations
Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) Commission onSmart Power Report: A Smarter, More Secure America (2007)Co-Chairs ~ Richard L. Armitage & Joseph S. Nye, Jr.
1999 Clinton Administration ended funding for the United States Information Agency(USIA) and merged operations into the United States Department of State.1999 saw creation of new Undersecretary for Public Diplomacy in Department of State.Overall spending on information and overall spending on information and educationaland cultural affairs rebounded in 2001 under the Bush administration. Spendinglevels, however, remain well below that of the USIA budgets of the early 1990’sCurrent annual public diplomacy spending at approximately $1.5 billion.

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