Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
6Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Dynamic Strategies for Small Business

Dynamic Strategies for Small Business

Ratings: (0)|Views: 687 |Likes:
Formulation of a strategic plan for small business can be an invigorating experience for the small business owner. The potential for reducing costs, and time consuming practices, can be eliminated by implementing this innovative dynamic strategies model. The tools of analysis are straight forward and can be applied by any individual. This book will assist you in developing a viable strategic plan for your business that will be brief, clear, concise, and easily understood. The benefits of the dynamic strategies model may increase commitment to excellence, effectiveness of performance, and profits.
Formulation of a strategic plan for small business can be an invigorating experience for the small business owner. The potential for reducing costs, and time consuming practices, can be eliminated by implementing this innovative dynamic strategies model. The tools of analysis are straight forward and can be applied by any individual. This book will assist you in developing a viable strategic plan for your business that will be brief, clear, concise, and easily understood. The benefits of the dynamic strategies model may increase commitment to excellence, effectiveness of performance, and profits.

More info:

Categories:Business/Law
Published by: Business Expert Press on Oct 07, 2010
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

08/09/2013

pdf

 
Contents
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1Chapter 1 Makings of an Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5Chapter 2 Beyond a Costly Strategic Business Model . . . . . . . . . .13Chapter 3 Dynamic Strategies Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23Chapter 4 Classical Linear Method. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41Chapter 5 Vision and Mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49Chapter 6 Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61Chapter 7 Objectives and Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69Chapter 8 Metrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81Chapter 9 Organizational Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85Chapter 10 Spiritual Business Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91Chapter 11 Model Sensitivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99Chapter 12 Dynamic Implementations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121 Appendix A Template for Your Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
Notes 
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
References 
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137
Index 
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141
 
Introduction
 We welcome you to explore the wonderful world of strategic planning ata level that is appropriate to a business of whatever size and market butthat is especially tailored to address the small business and entrepreneur.Students in an MBA or DBA program at most universities culminatetheir studies with a capstone course in which all the elements of the pro-gram are brought into play in order to conduct analyses and to developthe course product, a strategic business plan.
1
Yes, it is clear that twoor more years of coursework are essential for effectively performing theanalyses at the academic level. It is also clear that the one who knows thebusiness best is the individual who is deeply entrenched in the day-to-day operations. For the busy small-business owner, the time available forstudy at the academic level is limited, and it detracts from the ability of the organization to remain both viable and competitive.Our objective is not to detract from the tried and proven approachesto strategic planning that have served so well for so many years—rangingfrom Bennis,
2
Byars,
3
Hill,
4
Landrum,
5
and others—across so many var-ied organizations. Our objective is to recognize the small-business owner,the entrepreneur, and the employee of a small organization. They know deep in their being that the only way for the business to survive is to beflexible and to meet the demands of the customer right now and in such a way as to not squander the resources of the firm. These individuals know the product, the available resources, the customers, and what it takes tosucceed. How can we fail to recognize this knowledge?Because there are few barriers between the employee and the owner, who is deeply involved in all aspects of the business, it is an ideal way torecognize the internal knowledge that is available to draw upon. Wherelarger organizations struggle with how to empower their employees,
6
 employees in a small business are critically aware that their continuedemployment depends on their performance in making the organizationsuccessful. Where larger organizations are concerned with titles, the smallbusiness owner will pitch in to accomplish the most mundane chores
 
2 DYNAMIC STRATEGIES FOR SMALL BUSINESS
to ensure that business objectives are met. Granted that although themajority of business in the United States is small or entrepreneurial, wecontinue to address the needs of larger organizations, often to the exclu-sion of these small employers who are responsible for the bulk of theemployment.Steve Martin, responding to a question regarding the percentage of  jobs in the United States attributed to small business, responds, in part,Small businesses (defined as having fewer than 500 employees)represent a major part of the economy and account for 50% of employment in the United States, and according to the U.S. SmallBusiness Administration, create 60 to 80% of new jobs. The U.S.Bureau of the Census reports that of 113.4 million non-farmprivate sector workers in 2003, small firms with fewer than 500 workers employed 57.4 million (50.6%). Firms with fewer than100 employees employed 41.0 million (36%).
7
 As we look carefully at small business, we see that the culture is vastly different from what we expect to find in the large and well-establishedorganizations. The United States Small Business Administration (SBA)is clear that most small business fails because of a lack of capital andlack of planning. Lenders and banks issuing lines of credit are insistenton the small business owner having a business plan,
8
and they will oftenguarantee the line of credit with an attachment on the real property of the small business owner rather the business for which the business plan was prepared. One wonders, then, how much value the business planhas if the line of credit is not based on the plan but on the market valueof the owner’s home. In any case, the purpose here is not to investigatethe banking industry but to determine the strategy that a business mustdevelop before a viable business plan can be created. We look at the development of the strategic plan in plain businesslanguage, using project management tools to ensure clarity and a system-atic approach. We also take into consideration the cultural aspects at play in any organization, especially the small business organization, regardlessof where it may be located or the customer base it has. We invite you to join us in our investigation of several issues involved in the creation of 

Activity (6)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
rajkrishan liked this
Ashwini Cool liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->