Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Violence Actual and Imagined: Reflections on More Than 20 Years of Research

Violence Actual and Imagined: Reflections on More Than 20 Years of Research

Ratings: (0)|Views: 77|Likes:
Published by Jane Gilgun
For more than 20 years, I have done research on perpetrators of violence and on persons who have risks for violence but who lived law-abiding, pro-social lives. In this narrative, I describe my gradual understandings of the meanings of violence to perpetrators and how persons overcome adversities. I found that beliefs and desire for emotional gratification drove most violent acts, with little honest consideration of the effects of violence on others. People with risks but who did act in violent ways thought about consequences when they were about to do something hurtful. Their concerns for others and for their own well-being put the brakes on their thoughts for violence. I also grappled with how deeply embedded violent imagery is in my own heart and mind and how thoughts of consequences stopped me from doing the violent things that sometimes spring into my mind and heart.
For more than 20 years, I have done research on perpetrators of violence and on persons who have risks for violence but who lived law-abiding, pro-social lives. In this narrative, I describe my gradual understandings of the meanings of violence to perpetrators and how persons overcome adversities. I found that beliefs and desire for emotional gratification drove most violent acts, with little honest consideration of the effects of violence on others. People with risks but who did act in violent ways thought about consequences when they were about to do something hurtful. Their concerns for others and for their own well-being put the brakes on their thoughts for violence. I also grappled with how deeply embedded violent imagery is in my own heart and mind and how thoughts of consequences stopped me from doing the violent things that sometimes spring into my mind and heart.

More info:

Published by: Jane Gilgun on Oct 11, 2010
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/23/2014

pdf

text

original

 
 
Violence Actual and Imagined: Reflections on More Than 20 Years of Research
Jane F. Gilgun University of Minnesota, Twin Cities To be published in
 Reflections: Narratives of Professional Helping
5100 words running head: reflections on violence Key words: personal narrative, violence research, prevention, resilience Jane F. Gilgun, Ph.D., LICSW, is professor, School of Social Work, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, 1404 Gortner Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55108 USA. Professor Gilgun does research on children, adolescents, and adults who have confronted serious adversities. Her focus is on the development of violent behaviors, the meanings of violence to perpetrators, and how persons cope with, adapt to, and overcome adversities. She has presented locally, nationally, and internationally on resilience, her violence research, and on qualitative research methods, including the use of qualitative approaches for the development of assessment tools and for the development of theories of change.
 
reflections on violence 2
Abstract
For more than 20 years, I have done research on perpetrators of violence and on persons who have risks for violence but lived law-abiding, pro-social lives. In this narrative, I describe my gradual understandings of the meanings of violence to perpetrators and of the violence that resides in my own heart and in my use of violent imagery and thoughts in my daily life.
 
reflections on violence 3
Violence Actual and Imagined: Reflections on 20 Years of Research
I spent many years talking to men who had committed violent acts. Most were in prison when I interviewed them. Others had served time and were living in communities. I wanted to understand what violence means to perpetrators. I also wanted to understand why some men  become violent and others with similar risks do not. To do this, I interviewed men who had risks for being violent but who had not inflicted great harm on others and were law-abiding. To extend the comparisons, I interviewed women who had risks for violence, some of whom had committed violence as well. How to do this was simple: ask them. The people I interviewed taught me a lot. For example, I learned about resilience or how people cope with, adapt to, or overcome risks and adversities (Gilgun, 2009, 2008b, 2006, 2005, 2004a, 2002a, 1999a, 1999d, 1996a, 1996b, 1992, 1991, 1990; Gilgun & Sharma, 2008; Gilgun, Klein, & Pranis, 2000). Some people experience hardships such as long term abuse and neglect during childhood and the teen years and manage to live productive lives. Persons who showed resilience told stories of suffering and courage. Many became advocates for other people and served in battered women’s shelters, self-help groups, and in lobbying efforts for policy changes. Their stories inspired and enlightened me. I came away from interviews with people who showed resilience full of admiration for their persistence, courage, and determination to use their experiences to make life better for others. I also was angry at the abuse and other hardships they had endured and became more determined than ever to contribute to making things better. On a  personal note, my listening and learning helped me to see my own resilience and to appreciate

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->