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Morris County Historical Society Winter Newsletter 2009

Morris County Historical Society Winter Newsletter 2009

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Categories:Topics, Art & Design
Published by: Bonnie-Lynn Nadzeika on Oct 11, 2010
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Meet some of the New Jersey farmers andartisans who produce the food on your tableat “Local Harvest: Farms, Food, and Fami-lies,” a celebration of the farms of northernNew Jersey. Meet farmers, watch chef demos, sample and purchase local food, andlearn about north Jersey’s agricultural heri-tage past and present. Learn about CSA(Community Supported Agriculture) and signup for a share of the 2009 harvest. This fun-for-all-ages event is co-sponsored by theMorris County Historical Society and theNorthern New Jersey chapter of Slow FoodUSA. It’s at the Frelinghuysen Arboretum,Saturday, January 17, 2009 (snow date Janu-ary 24), 1-4 p.m. And admission is free!
Some of the farms and artisans that will be atthe event:
 
PLAID PIPER FARM
, Branchville, NJ
BOB-O-LINK DAIRY & BAKEYARD
,Vernon, NJ
CSG AT GENESIS FARM
, Blairstown, NJ
STARBRITE FARM
, Newton, NJ
BAKE HOUSE BREAD,
Columbia, NJ
VALLEY SHEPHERD CREAMERY
, LongValley, NJ
BEST’S FRUIT FARM,
Hackettstown, NJ
DEGAGE FARM
, Rockaway, NJ
ROGOWSKI FARM
, Warwick, NY
HAVENWOOD FARM,
Newton, NJ
WINTER 2009
Local Harvest
… and our membership continues to grow 
Please welcomethe following newmembers:

Penny Jones

John Kern

Mary Leonardis

Jaxon & ArleneTeck 
Photo Shoots From the Director Home Garden Club ilms for Foodies Upcoming Exhibits Tea Party Kings and Westy Help Out New Board Member MCHS Staffer Awarded Ball Photos Membership 7 
Inside this issue:
Morris County Historical SocietyAt Acorn Hall
Films for Foodies
On Friday afternoons in January, the Mor-ris County Historical Society and the Mor-ris County Library will present a series of films focused on food and cooking, in con-nection with
Key Ingredients: America byFood 
, on display at the library throughJanuary 25.The 2007 romantic comedy
 No Reservations
will be shown onJanuary 16. The movie starsCatherine Zeta-Jones as a topchef who must adapt her lifewhen her sister is killed and shemust care for her young niece.This movie is rated PG.
Continued on page 4
DUCKY LIFE TEA,
Asbury, NJ
ALTER ECO,
Murray Hill, NJ
THE HEALTH SHOPPE,
Morris-town, NJ, with foods and productsfrom these area farms:
BLOOMING GLEN FARM
, Per-kasie, PA
CAYUGA PURE ORGANICS
,Brooktondale, NY
WILD HIVE FARM
, Clinton Cor-ners, NY
SHUSHAN VALLEY HYDROFARMS
, Shushan, NY
BIG BUCK FARM
, Hammonton, NJ
The event is part of the program-ming complementing the Society’scurrent exhibits
Who’s Minding theStore?
,
 
at Acorn Hall, and
Key In-gredients: America by Food 
, aSmithsonian Institution travelingexhibition at the Morris CountyLibrary December 13-January 25.The
Key Ingredients
Garden Statetour has been underwritten by theNew Jersey Council for the Hu-manities. Additional support forthe exhibit’s Morris County visitwas provided by Westy Self Stor-age and Kings Super Markets.
 
PAGE 2
MCHS
WINTER 2009
The MCHS Holiday NICE List
Melvin ArroyaLucia BoreckiBarbara BenedictDag BulmanMichele BumillerKemper ChambersElizabeth ChaoHelen ClearBridget ConlogueBetsy CooperNancy CooperStephanie DamianoSusan Data-Samtak Lucille EckersonDiane FreedmanJessica HanVivi KleschJon KropaMary Hauser-KropaHistory Club, Villa Walsh AcademyHome Garden Club of MorristownJames HowardMeg ImbrialeSandra ItalianoVivi KleschJon KropaGregg KurlanderMichelle LamLinda NadzeikaHeather NelsonOlivia NguyenJennifer OchmanBen OlexRon OulletteLiz PierceMichael SchronHelen SmithLinda TarrLynne TaylorTom Thornton
We
all know how beautiful AcornHall is, but its historic interiorshave recently caught the eye of several professional photographers,too.This fall, Acorn Hall became thesurprising setting for the team pho-tos of the Morristown Madams,Morristown’s local women’s rollerderby team. Team president “DeeLicious” just knocked on the doorone day and was delighted at whatshe saw. Although the Madams’tongue-in-cheek history links themto Morristown’s Revolutionarypast, they thought the Hall’s his-toric setting would be a great back-ground for them. So on a Sundayafternoon, the entire team showedup for their pictures, taken in thedining room and on the grand stair-case. They were very careful aboutour old floors and their wheels!Some of those photos have ap-peared in the Madams’ program.Roller Derby is a rapidly growingsport that has quadrupled in sizeover the last five years. There areover 300 roller derby teams world-wide. Founded in May 2006, theMadams attract a wide range of spectators from senior citizens toelementary school students. Theirhome games are at the MorristownRink. Learn more about the team atwww.morristownmadams.com.Then, amidst the last-minute bustleof getting Acorn Hall ready forHolly Walk in December, a crowdof students from the County Col-lege of Morris – eight design stu-dents, their models, and their entou-rages – arrived for a fashion shoot.They were students of James How-ard, associate professor and coordi-nator of design studies at CCM andan Acorn Hall volunteer. The stu-dents has originally planned to taketheir pictures at another museum,but when that organization can-celled at virtually the last minute,Acorn Hall was asked to fill in, andwe willingly agreed.Morris County Vocational Schoolcosmetology students did hair andmakeup on the models, while pro-fessional photographer Juliet Fosterof Rockaway volunteered her ser-vices. Since the original designassignment was to create an outfitthat was modern yet reflected thepast, many of the models lookedright at home in Acorn Hall’s Vic-torian setting. You can see the stu-dents’ creations in person at a fash-ion show planned for May in theCCM gym.The following volunteers either helped deck the Hall this year, served as docents during Holly Walk, provided music,or otherwise made our big holiday weekend a success. They’re definitely on our “nice” list! Thank you to
Say Cheese!
 MCHS Trustee Learned (Dag) Bulman and volunteer Susan Data-Samtak dressed for the occasion!
 
PAGE 3
David Daehnke, “PruningMade Simple”
David Daehnke, aka The GardenGuru, has a radio show onWGHT 1500AM, works at theVan Vleck Gardens in Mont-clair, and has a fun way of teaching gardening skills.Wednesday, January 21, 2009,at 1:00 p.m. at theFrelinghuysen Arboretum.
MCHS
WINTER 2009
Linda Sercus, “PresbyGardens and the Iris”
Linda Sercus is director of thePresby Memorial Iris Gardens inMontclair, the world’s largestdisplay garden of irises. The col-lection of more than 2,000 varie-ties includes tall and dwarf bearded iris, as well as historicirises. Wednesday, March 18,2009, at 1:00 p.m. at theFrelinghuysen Arboretum.
Home Garden Club
From the Director
Happy New Year!Whether you get your news via television, the internet, or the newspaper, there hasn’t been a great dealof news to be happy about recently. So I am going to take it upon myself to give you good news aboutthe Morris County Historical Society. This past year was an incredibly productive and successful onefrom our point of view. We did more programming than ever before; we were honored by the New Jer-sey Council for the Humanities to serve as a host site for the Smithsonian Institution’s traveling exhibit
Key Ingredients: America By Food 
; and we received more publicity for our programs than ever before.We owe much of this success to a variety of supporters. Kings Super Markets provided a generous do-nation towards our current exhibit,
Who’s Minding the Store?
, while Westy Storage donated truckingand storage costs for
Key Ingredients
. The New Jersey Council for the Humanities provided grantmoney for programming. These donations made a huge difference in what we were able to accomplish.It’s hard to project what we will be able to achieve in 2009. The difference between a good year and agreat year is actually small for us; we are not a big-budget organization. And you may be surprised howyou as members and supporters can make that difference. You might think it’s a matter of money, but itis much more than that. We could use a few hours of your time to help out with a program. We’re look-ing for some help in rescuing and preserving the remaining slab of our historic oak and turning it into adisplay that will memorialize that beautiful tree. Even bringing a friend or relative by to visit AcornHall and see an exhibit is helping
the more visitors we get the more successful our grant applicationswill be. Instead of buying some gift at the mall, stop by our shop. The perfect gift can also be supportfor our organization.I hope to see you in 2009. You will make the difference between a good year and a great year!
Bonnie-Lynn Nadzeika

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