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Marcus Aurelis

Marcus Aurelis

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Published by Stan Spencer
from the Roman Emperor and Conqueror some of his inner thoughts
from the Roman Emperor and Conqueror some of his inner thoughts

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Categories:Types, Speeches
Published by: Stan Spencer on Oct 12, 2010
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Meditations, by Marcus AureliusThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: MeditationsAuthor: Marcus AureliusRelease Date: December 25, 2008 [EBook #2680]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ASCII*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK MEDITATIONS ***Produced by J. Boulton, and David Widger 
MEDITATIONS
By Marcus Aurelius
MARCUS AURELIUS ANTONINUS THE ROMAN EMPEROR
Original Transcriber's Note:
 The Greek portions of the text have been added byhand and they will require the standard "Symbol" font"symbol.ttf" to be installed in the system fonts folder.This is a standard Windows font, so should be presenton most systems.
Project Gutenberg Editor's Note:
 The original html file with the passages in Greek insymbol.ttf font do not display in many browsers andwith great distortion in IE6. For those who wish to try,this original file may be viewed at:File with Symbol.ttfFont 
 
Page 1 of 151Marcus Aurelius Antoninus the Roman Emperor, by Marcus Aurelius2/4/2009http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2680/2680-h/2680-h.htm
 
 
BOOKS
Paragraphs with First Lines
INTRODUCTION
HIS FIRST BOOK
 
THE SECOND BOOK
 
THE THIRD BOOK
 
THE FOURTH BOOK
 
THE FIFTH BOOK
 
THE SIXTH BOOK
 
THE SEVENTH BOOK
 
THE EIGHTH BOOK
 
THE NINTH BOOK
 
THE TENTH BOOK
 
THE ELEVENTH BOOK
 
THE TWELFTH BOOK
 APPENDIXNOTESGLOSSARY
HIS FIRST BOOK
 I. Of my grandfather Verus I have learned to be gentle and meek, and toII. Of him that brought me up, not to be fondly addicted to either of III. Of Diognetus, not to busy myself about vain things, and not easilyIV. To Rusticus I am beholding, that I first entered into the conceitV. From Apollonius, true liberty, and unvariable steadfastness, and notVI. Of Sextus, mildness and the pattern of a family governed withVII. From Alexander the Grammarian, to be un-reprovable myself, and notVIII. Of Fronto, to how much envy and fraud and hypocrisy the state of aIX. Of Alexander the Platonic, not often nor without great necessity toX. Of Catulus, not to contemn any friend's expostulation, though unjust,XI. From my brother Severus, to be kind and loving to all them of myXII. From Claudius Maximus, in all things to endeavour to have powerXIII. In my father, I observed his meekness; his constancy withoutXIV. From the gods I received that I had good grandfathers, and parents,XV. In the country of the Quadi at Granua, these. Betimes in the morningXVI. Whatsoever I am, is either flesh, or life, or that which we
 
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THE SECOND BOOK
 I. Remember how long thou hast already put off these things, and howII. Let it be thy earnest and incessant care as a Roman and a man toIII. Do, soul, do; abuse and contemn thyself; yet a while and the timeIV. Why should any of these things that happen externally, so muchV. For not observing the state of another man's soul, scarce was everVI. These things thou must always have in mind: What is the natureVII. Theophrastus, where he compares sin with sin (as after a vulgarVIII. Whatsoever thou dost affect, whatsoever thou dost project, so do,IX. Consider how quickly all things are dissolved and resolved: theX. It is the part of a man endowed with a good understanding faculty, toXI. Consider with thyself how man, and by what part of his, is joinedXII. If thou shouldst live three thousand, or as many as ten thousandsXIII. Remember that all is but opinion and conceit, for those thingsXIV. A man's soul doth wrong and disrespect itself first and especially,XV. The time of a man's life is as a point; the substance of it ever
THE THIRD BOOK
 I. A man must not only consider how daily his life wasteth andII. This also thou must observe, that whatsoever it is that naturallyIII. Hippocrates having cured many sicknesses, fell sick himself andIV. Spend not the remnant of thy days in thoughts and fancies concerningV. Do nothing against thy will, nor contrary to the community, norVI. To be cheerful, and to stand in no need, either of other men's helpVII. If thou shalt find anything in this mortal life better thanVIII. Never esteem of anything as profitable, which shall ever constrainIX. In the mind that is once truly disciplined and purged, thou canstX. Use thine opinative faculty with all honour and respect, for inXI. To these ever-present helps and mementoes, let one more be added,XII. What is this, that now my fancy is set upon? of what things dothXIII. If thou shalt intend that which is present, following the rule of XIV. As physicians and chirurgeons have always their instruments readyXV. Be not deceived; for thou shalt never live to read thy moralXVI. To steal, to sow, to buy, to be at rest, to see what is to be doneXVII. To be capable of fancies and imaginations, is common to man and
THE FOURTH BOOK
 I. That inward mistress part of man if it be in its own true naturalII. Let nothing be done rashly, and at random, but all things accordingIII. They seek for themselves private retiringIV. If to understand and to be reasonable be common unto all men, thenV. As generation is, so also death, a secret of nature's wisdom: aVI. Such and such thins, from such and such causes, must of necessit
 
Page 3 of 151Marcus Aurelius Antoninus the Roman Emperor, by Marcus Aurelius2/4/2009http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2680/2680-h/2680-h.htm

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