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Don Bosco's Dream about Rescue Church

Don Bosco's Dream about Rescue Church

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Published by Hubert Luns
The dream of the two columns about the final victory of the Church. Don Bosco was an Italian priest dedicated to disadvantaged youth in the suburbs of Turin. Early in life he heard a voice, which said: “Not with blows, but with charity and gentleness must you draw these friends to the path of virtue.” He placed his works under the protection of Francis de Sales. His followers are therefore known as the Salesians. He was canonised by Pius XI in 1934. On 30 May 1862 at his usual Good Night Talk…
The dream of the two columns about the final victory of the Church. Don Bosco was an Italian priest dedicated to disadvantaged youth in the suburbs of Turin. Early in life he heard a voice, which said: “Not with blows, but with charity and gentleness must you draw these friends to the path of virtue.” He placed his works under the protection of Francis de Sales. His followers are therefore known as the Salesians. He was canonised by Pius XI in 1934. On 30 May 1862 at his usual Good Night Talk…

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Categories:Types, Reviews
Published by: Hubert Luns on Oct 15, 2010
Copyright:Public Domain

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07/27/2014

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- 1 -
Don Bosco's Dream about theRescue of the Church
- the dream of the two columns -
Don Bosco (1815-1888) was an Italian priest dedicated to disadvantaged youth in thesuburbs of Turin. Early in life he heard a voice, which said:
“Not with blows, but withcharity and gentleness must you draw these friends to the path of virtue.”
He placed hisworks under the protection of Francis de Sales. His followers are therefore known as theSalesians. He was canonised by Pius XI in 1934.On 30 May 1862 at his usual Good Night Talk he described to his boys and the youngclerics that he was training, a dream he had had a few nights before.
 
«« My dear boys, I want to tell you a dream to-night. Try to picture yourselves withme on the seashore, or, better still, on an outlying cliff with no other land in sight.The vast expanse of water is covered with a formidable array of ships in battleformation, prows fitted with sharp spear-like beaks capable of breaking through anydefence. All are heavily armed with cannons, incendiary bombs, and all kinds of weaponry – even books – and are heading towards one stately ship, mightier thanthem all. As they try to close in, they try to ram it, set it afire, and cripple it as muchas possible. This stately vessel is shielded by a flotilla escort. Winds and waves arewith the enemy. In this midst of this endless sea and far away, two solid columns, ashort distance apart, soar high into the sky. One is surmounted by a statue of theImmaculate Virgin at whose feet a large inscription reads: “AuxiliumChristianorum” (Help of Christians). The other, far loftier and sturdier, supports aHoly Host of proportionate size and bears beneath it the inscription “Saluscredentium” (Salvation of believers).The flagship commander, the Roman Pontiff, seeing the enemy’s fury and hisauxiliary ships’ very grave predicament, summons his captains to a conference.However, as they discuss their strategy, a furious storm breaks out and they mustreturn to their ships. When the storm abates, the Pope again summons his captains asthe flagship keeps on its course. But the storm rages again. Standing at the helm, thePope strains every muscle to steer his ship towards and between the two columnsfrom whose summits hang many anchors and strong hooks linked to chains.

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