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Is It a Noun or a Verb

Is It a Noun or a Verb

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Published by Mubarak Abdessalami
Sometimes we cannot say if a given word is a verb a noun. They look identical. This graphic misleading look is only unveiled through context ... Enjoy the fun
Sometimes we cannot say if a given word is a verb a noun. They look identical. This graphic misleading look is only unveiled through context ... Enjoy the fun

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Published by: Mubarak Abdessalami on Oct 13, 2007
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01/06/2015

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 Is it a noun or a verb?
Is context enough to display the difference?
By M. Abdessalami  
Introduction:
The graphic relationship between a noun and a verb in many situations is very close and it sometimes creates a sort of bewilderment for most non-native English language speakers especially those who use a European language, French, Italian, and others. It is through context and spelling that the distinction can be made. It is sometimes very tricky to tell if a given word is a noun or a verb unless it is used in a context or unless one detects a slight spelling difference between the words. However the main difficulty dwells rather in the writing more than in the reading. Non-native speakers of English have to pay attention to the very special relationship which exists between many Noun-Verb families.
Look-alikes
"Dance" or "Dance"?
In many cases the verb and the noun are twins in spelling and meaning; that's why, grammatically speaking, it is tough to make the difference between the two when they manifest discrete. You can not decide which is which unless they are used in a context. When the word "dance", for instance, is isolated, nobody, even native speakers, can tell if it is a noun or a verb. Look at this example, - "You can dance ... Save the last dance for me!" Dolly Parton The first “dance” is obviously a verb whereas the second is a noun. Examples as such are seen in terms of twins and some of them are:
 
Is it a verb or a noun ? M. Abdessalami
2
trade design roar win puzzle rain start show fish haunt water call work drink change talk sleep cut question ...
« Watch » or « watch »?
Very so often the verb and noun have the same spelling but they don't dovetail in the final meaning. That is they have different fields of performance. Here is an example: - I'd like to watch that match with you, but I have to buy a watch first. The first “watch” is clearly a verb whereas the second is a noun designing the small timepiece which we generally wear on our wrists. The verb here has nothing to do with the noun they are not of the same relation. They only share the spelling feature. I mean they do not relate to each other in the sense that "dance" is related to "dance". The same thing can be said about the word "play": */ The musician plays the banjo. (verb) */ "Othello" is one of Shakespeare's plays (noun). Here are some examples of the words in this category:
bear cast cut fly leave ring sink steal ... ...
Illustration
 
Is it a verb or a noun ? M. Abdessalami
3
 bear (v)
[simple past]
 bore
 -
[past participle]
 
 borne
1.
 
I can’t
 bear
 eating the same thing everyday.
 bear
 (n) 2.
 
She told me that the polar
 bear
 is deaf.
cast (v)
cast - cast
 
1.
 
Don’t
cast
 yor eyes from me !hen I am tal"ing to yo.
cast (n)
2.
 
 #e !on’t need the !hole
cast
 on stage in the follo!ing $ct.
cut (v)
ct - ct
 
1.
 
She
cut
 her finger %adly.
cut (n)
2.
 
 $s the
cut
 !as deep they too" her to hospital immediately.
fly (v)
fle! - flo!n
 
1.
 
&irds can
fly 
 high in the s"y easily 2.
 
'an she really
fly
a plane
fly (n)
.
 
*he
 fly 
 is a disgsting insect.
leave (v)
left - left
 
1.
 
 #e sholdn’t
leave
 the %a%y alone. 2.
 
 #e are not allo!ed to
leave
 %efore + pm.
leave (n)
.
 
She too" an npaid
leave
 to ta"e care of her sic" mother.
ring (v)
rang - rng
 
1.
 
 ,o can either "noc" at the door or
ring
 the %ell.
ring (n)
2.
 
*he !edding
ring
 costs a lot of money.
sink (v)
san" - sn" 
 
1.
 
ish never
sink 
 
sink (n)
2.
 
I sally have a pro%lem !ith this %loody "itchen
sink 
 
steal
 (v) stole - stolen 1.
 
e !anted to
 steal
 my mo%ile phone/ %y I sa! him.
steal (n)
*his rler is made of
steal
. I thin" it is stainless.
Spelling tricks
"Advice" or "Advise"

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