Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Electricity for the Farm

Electricity for the Farm

Ratings: (0)|Views: 107 |Likes:
Published by Moseyspeed

More info:

Published by: Moseyspeed on Oct 24, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/28/2012

pdf

text

original

 
CHAPTER ICHAPTER IICHAPTER IIICHAPTER IVCHAPTER VCHAPTER VICHAPTER VIICHAPTER VIIICHAPTER IXCHAPTER XCHAPTER XICHAPTER XIICHAPTER ICHAPTER IICHAPTER IIICHAPTER IVCHAPTER VCHAPTER VICHAPTER VIIChapter FiveCHAPTER VIIICHAPTER IXCHAPTER XCHAPTER XICHAPTER XII
for the farm, by Frederick Irving Anderson
for the farm, by Frederick Irving Anderson1
 
Project Gutenberg's Electricity for the farm, by Frederick Irving Anderson This eBook is for the use of anyoneanywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use itunder the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.netTitle: Electricity for the farm Light, heat and power by inexpensive methods from the water wheel or farmengineAuthor: Frederick Irving AndersonRelease Date: November 14, 2008 [EBook #27257]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ISO-8859-1*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK ELECTRICITY FOR THE FARM ***Produced by Stacy Brown, Marcia Brooks, Steven Giacomelli and the Online Distributed Proofreading Teamat http://www.pgdp.net (This file was produced from images produced by Core Historical Literature inAgriculture (CHLA), Cornell University)ELECTRICITY FOR THE FARMTHE MACMILLAN COMPANYNEW YORK · BOSTON · CHICAGO · DALLAS ATLANTA · SAN FRANCISCOMACMILLAN & CO., Limited LONDON · BOMBAY · CALCUTTA · MELBOURNETHE MACMILLAN CO. OF CANADA, Ltd. TORONTO[Illustration: Even the tiny trout brook becomes a thing of utility as well as of joy(
Courtesy of the Fitz Water Wheel Company, Hanover, Pa.
)]ELECTRICITY FOR THE FARMLIGHT, HEAT AND POWER BY INEXPENSIVE METHODS FROM THE WATER WHEEL OR FARMENGINEBY FREDERICK IRVING ANDERSONAUTHOR OF "THE FARMER OF TO-MORROW," ETC., ETC.New York THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 1915
 All rights reserved 
Copyright, 1915 By THE CURTIS PUBLISHING COMPANY The Country GentlemanCopyright, 1915 By THE MACMILLAN COMPANY Set up and electrotyped. Published April, 1915.
for the farm, by Frederick Irving Anderson2
 
PREFACEThis book is designed primarily to give the farmer a practical working knowledge of electricity for use aslight, heat, and power on the farm. The electric generator, the dynamo, is explained in detail; and there arechapters on electric transmission and house-wiring, by which the farm mechanic is enabled to install his ownplant without the aid and expense of an expert.With modern appliances, within the means of the average farmer, the generation of electricity, with its uniqueconveniences, becomes automatic, provided some dependable source of power is to be had--such as a waterwheel, gasoline (or other form of internal combustion) engine, or the ordinary windmill. The water wheel isthe ideal prime mover for the dynamo in isolated plants. Since water-power is running to waste on tens of thousands of our farms throughout the country, several chapters are devoted to this phase of the subject: theseinclude descriptions and working diagrams of weirs and other simple devices for measuring the flow of streams; there are tables and formulas by which any one, with a knowledge of simple arithmetic, maydetermine the power to be had from falling water under given conditions; and in addition, there are diagramsshowing in general the method of construction of dams, bulkheads, races, flumes, etc., from materials usuallyto be found on a farm. The tiny unconsidered brook that waters the farm pasture frequently possesses powerenough to supply the farmstead with clean, cool, safe light in place of the dangerous, inconvenient oil lamp; asmall stream capable of developing from twenty-five to fifty horsepower will supply a farmer (at practicallyno expense beyond the original cost of installation) not only with light, but with power for even the heavierfarm operations, as threshing; and in addition will do the washing, ironing, and cooking, and at the same timekeep the house warm in the coldest weather. Less than one horsepower of energy will light the farmstead; lessthan five horsepower of energy will provide light and small power, and take the drudgery out of the kitchen.For those not fortunate enough to possess water-power which can be developed, there are chapters on the useof the farm gasoline engine and windmill, in connection with the modern storage battery, as sources of electriccurrent.It is desired to make acknowledgment for illustrations and assistance in gathering material for the book, to theeditors of 
The Country Gentleman
, Philadelphia, Pa.; The Crocker-Wheeler Company, Ampere, N. J.; TheGeneral Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y.; the Weston Electrical Instrument Company, of Newark, N. J.;The Chase Turbine Manufacturing Company, Orange, Mass.; the C. P. Bradway Machine Works, WestStafford, Conn.; The Pelton Water Wheel Company, San Francisco and New York; the Ward LeonardManufacturing Company, Bronxville, N. Y.; The Fairbanks, Morse Company, Chicago; and the Fitz WaterWheel Company, Hanover, Pa.TABLE OF CONTENTSPAGEINTRODUCTION xviiPART IWATER-POWER
for the farm, by Frederick Irving Anderson3

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->