Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The treatment of prisoners - European standards

The treatment of prisoners - European standards

Ratings: (0)|Views: 40 |Likes:
Published by Council of Europe
At the start of the 21st century, some 2 million Europeans were detained against their will in prisons, police stations, mental health institutions or other detention centres. It is generally recognised that protection against the arbitrary deprivation of liberty and the prevention of ill-treatment reflect the extent to which states respect human rights and human dignity, when these can be jeopardised by demands for security and efficiency.
This book describes the European system for the protection of people deprived of their liberty and how this has evolved over the past fifty years. It discusses the different initiatives taken by the Council of Europe in this area, of which the European Convention on Human Rights and the Convention for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment are the most significant.
At the start of the 21st century, some 2 million Europeans were detained against their will in prisons, police stations, mental health institutions or other detention centres. It is generally recognised that protection against the arbitrary deprivation of liberty and the prevention of ill-treatment reflect the extent to which states respect human rights and human dignity, when these can be jeopardised by demands for security and efficiency.
This book describes the European system for the protection of people deprived of their liberty and how this has evolved over the past fifty years. It discusses the different initiatives taken by the Council of Europe in this area, of which the European Convention on Human Rights and the Convention for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment are the most significant.

More info:

Published by: Council of Europe on Oct 27, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/27/2012

pdf

text

original

 
13
Preface
Amongst its many achievements, the Council of Europe is best known for itswork in human rights. Whatever the future pace or direction of Europeanintegration, the willingness of European states after 1945 and again after1989 to commit themselves to political co-operation with a view to estab-lishing long-lasting peace on the continent through the development of ashared commitment to democratic values cemented into place the most cru-cial aspects of a new European understanding. States have signed up for sucha package not out of narrow and short-term self-interest but on account of agenuine desire to prevent repetition of the mistakes of the past, and it is arejection of that past which explains the central importance of the rule of lawand respect for human rights in this new regional order.A particular category of beneficiaries of this new concern is persons deprivedof their liberty for whom the human rights dimension of the work of theCouncil of Europe has a particular resonance. Indeed, detainees were cer-tainly not slow to take advantage of the right of individual application to the(former) European Commission on Human Rights, and in consequence,Commission and Court jurisprudence in respect of the treatment of personsdeprived of their liberty helped clarify the practical impact of state responsi-bilities under the European Convention on Human Rights in this area fromthe outset. At the same time, deliberations by the Parliamentary Assemblyand by the Committee of Ministers led to recommendations and resolutionsseeking to encourage member states to take specific action in certain areasconnected with deprivation of liberty, including matters relating to staffingand training, prison conditions and the development of alternatives to lossof liberty. Subsequently, the establishment of the European Committee forthe Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment orPunishment (“the CPT”) provided a vital additional impetus to states to takefurther action, and the impact of this innovation – a further instance of thecommitment of European states to effective implementation of human rightsprotection – has been profound. And if any further proof of the focus of theCouncil of Europe on the status, protection and treatment of personsdeprived of their liberty were needed, this is now available in the shape of the work of the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance(“ECRI”) and of the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights inexamining particular situations of concern.While attempting to bring together the wide range of standards establishedin case law, recommendations and CPT reports and celebrating the achieve-ments of the Council of Europe, it is also appropriate to appreciate that thereis often a difficulty in translating rhetoric into reality, for state commitmentsdo not always result in appropriate action. Judgments of the Court readilyillustrate this; and so do shortcomings noted by the CPT, by ECRI, or by the

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->