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Carroll Quigley - Tragedy and Hope: A History of The World in Our Time

Carroll Quigley - Tragedy and Hope: A History of The World in Our Time

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Published by Sherritty
Carroll Quigley, Georgetown University history professor (deceased), in Tragedy and Hope: A History of the World in Our Time, 1966, made this claim:



\"There does exist and has existed for a generation, an international Anglophile network which operates, to some extent, in the way the radical Right believes the Communists act. In fact, this network, which we may identify as the Round Table groups, has no aversion to cooperating with the Communists, or any other groups, and frequently does so. I know of the operations of this network because I have studied it for 20 years and was permitted for two years, in the early 1960s, to examine its papers and secret record.



\"In addition to these pragmatic goals, the powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent private meetings and conferences. The apex of the system was the Bank for International Settlements in Basle, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world\'s central banks which were themselves private corporations. The growth of financial capitalism made possible a centralization of world economic control and use of this power for the direct benefit of financiers and the indirect injury of all other economic groups.\'\'

pp. 950 and 324
Carroll Quigley, Georgetown University history professor (deceased), in Tragedy and Hope: A History of the World in Our Time, 1966, made this claim:



\"There does exist and has existed for a generation, an international Anglophile network which operates, to some extent, in the way the radical Right believes the Communists act. In fact, this network, which we may identify as the Round Table groups, has no aversion to cooperating with the Communists, or any other groups, and frequently does so. I know of the operations of this network because I have studied it for 20 years and was permitted for two years, in the early 1960s, to examine its papers and secret record.



\"In addition to these pragmatic goals, the powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent private meetings and conferences. The apex of the system was the Bank for International Settlements in Basle, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world\'s central banks which were themselves private corporations. The growth of financial capitalism made possible a centralization of world economic control and use of this power for the direct benefit of financiers and the indirect injury of all other economic groups.\'\'

pp. 950 and 324

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Published by: Sherritty on Jul 23, 2008
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04/24/2014

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 Tragedy and HopeA History of the World in Our TimeByCarroll QuigleyVolumes 1-8New York: The Macmillan Company1966Table of ContentsIntroductionPrefacePart One—Introduction: Western Civilization In Its World SettingChapter 1—Cultural Evolution in CivilizationsChapter 2—Cultural Diffusion in Western Civilization 2Chapter 3—Europe's Shift to the Twentieth CenturyPart Two—Western Civilization to 1914Chapter 4—The Pattern of ChangeChapter 5—European Economic DevelopmentsChapter 6—The United States to 1917Part Three—The Russian Empire to 1917Chapter 7—Creation of the Russian CivilizationPart Four—The Buffer FringeChapter 8—The Near East to 1914
 
Chapter 9—The British Imperial Crisis: Africa, Ireland, and India to 1926Chapter 10—The Far East to World War IPart Five—The First World War: 1914: 1918Chapter 11—The Growth of International Tensions, 1871-1914Chapter 12—Military History, 1914-1918Chapter 13—Diplomatic History, 1914-1 918Chapter 14—The Home Front, 1914-1918Part Six—The Versailles System and the Return to Normalcy: 1919-1929Chapter 15—The Peace Settlements, 1919-1923Chapter 16—Security, 1919-1935Chapter 17—Disarmament, 1919-1935Chapter 18—Reparations, 1919-1932Part Seven—Finance, Commercial and Business Activity: 1897-1947Chapter 19—Reflation and Inflation, 1897-1925Chapter 20—The Period of Stabilization, 1922-1930Chapter 21—The Period of Deflation, 1927- 1936Chapter 22—Reflation and Inflation, 1933-1947Part Eight—International Socialism and the Soviet ChallengeChapter 23—The International Socialist MovementChapter 24—The Bolshevik Revolution to 1924Chapter 25—Stalinism, 1924-1939Part Nine—Germany from Kaiser to Hitler: 1913-1945Chapter 26—Introduction
 
Chapter 27—The Weimar Republic, 1918-1933Chapter 28—The Nazi RegimePart Ten—Britain: the Background to Appeasement: 1900-1939Chapter 29—The Social and Constitutional BackgroundChapter 30—Political History to 1939Part Eleven—Changing Economic PatternsChapter 31—IntroductionChapter 32—Great BritainChapter 33—GermanyChapter 34—FranceChapter 35—The United States of AmericaChapter 36—The Economic FactorsChapter 37—The Results of Economic DepressionChapter 38—The Pluralist Economy and World BlocsPart Twelve—The Policy of Appeasement, 1931-1936Chapter 39—IntroductionChapter 40—The Japanese Assault, 1931-1941Chapter 41—The Italian Assault, 1934-1936Chapter 42—Circles and Counter-circles, 1935-1939Chapter 43—The Spanish Tragedy, 1931–1939Part Thirteen—The Disruption of Europe: 1937-1939Chapter 44—Austria Infelix, 1933-1938Chapter 45—The Czechoslovak Crisis, 1937-1938