Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword or section
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Facets of Buddhist Thought

Facets of Buddhist Thought

Ratings: (0)|Views: 69 |Likes:
Six Essays on various aspects of Theravada Buddhism. By K. N. Jayatilleke. Wheel Publication No. 162–164.
Six Essays on various aspects of Theravada Buddhism. By K. N. Jayatilleke. Wheel Publication No. 162–164.

More info:

Published by: Buddhist Publication Society on Oct 31, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/05/2011

pdf

text

original

 
Facets of Buddhist Thought
Six Essays
By
 K. N. Jayatilleke
M. A. (Cantab.), Ph. D. (London),Professor of Philosophy, University of Ceylon
Buddhist Publication SocietyKandy • Sri Lanka
The Wheel Publication No. 162/163/164
First Edition 1971Second Printing 1984BPS Online Edition © (2008)Digital Transcription Source: BPS Transcription ProjectFor free distribution. This work may be republished, reformatted, reprinted and redistributed inany medium. However, any such republication and redistribution is to be made available to thepublic on a free and unrestricted basis, and translations and other derivative works are to beclearly marked as such.
 
Contents
The Buddhist Conception of the Universe......................................................................................3The Buddhist Attitude to God........................................................................................................10The Buddhist Attitude to Revelation.............................................................................................17The Buddhist Conception of Truth................................................................................................23The Buddhist Conception of Matter and the Material World.....................................................30The Buddhist Analysis of Mind......................................................................................................362
 
The Buddhist Conception of the Universe
The early Indians and Greeks speculated about the nature, origin and extent of the universe.Anaximander, a Greek thinker of the 6
th
century B.C. is supposed to have contemplated thepossibility of “innumerable worlds” successively coming out of (and passing away) into anindefinite substance. About a century later, the Greek atomists, Leucippus and Democritus, whopostulated the existence of innumerable atoms and an infinite void, conceived of worldscoming-to-be and passing away throughout the void. These speculations were the product of imagination and reason and the “worlds” they talked of were mere reproductions of the earthand the heavenly bodies such as the sun, moon and the stars.The contemporary Indian speculations prior to Buddhism were on the same lines, except forthe fact that some of them were claimed to be based on extra-sensory perception as well. Herethere appears to have been even a wider variety of views than to be found among the Greeks.The early Buddhist texts summarise their views according to the Buddhist logic of fouralternatives. With regard to the extent of the universe, the following four types of views werecurrent: (1) Those who held that the universe was finite in all dimensions, (2) those who heldthat the universe was infinite in all dimensions, (3) those who held that the universe was finitein some dimensions and infinite in others and (4) those who rejected all the above three viewsand held that the universe was neither finite nor infinite.This last view was held by thinkers who argued that the universe or space was unreal. If so,spatial epithets like “finite” or “infinite” cannot be applied to the universe. So the universe isneither finite nor infinite.Similarly, with regard to the origin of the universe, there were thinkers who put forward allfour possible views viz. (1) Some held that the universe had a beginning or origin in time, (2)others that it had no beginning in time, (3) still others that the universe had in one sense a beginning in time and in another sense no beginning in time. This would be so if the universehad relative origins, its substance being eternal while it came into being and passed away fromtime to time; (4) finally, there were those who put forward the theory that since time was unrealit did not make sense to say that the universe had an origin in time or no origin in time. For thislast group of thinkers the universe was “neither eternal nor not eternal.”It is with original Buddhism that we get for the first time in the history of thought aconception of the universe, which can in any way be meaningfully compared with the modernpicture of the universe as we know it in contemporary astronomy. This is all the moreremarkable when we find no other such conception, which foreshadowed or forestalled moderndiscoveries in ancient or medieval thought of the East or West.
“The Universe” 
Before we describe the essential features of the Buddhist account of the universe or cosmos, it isnecessary to clarify what we today mean by the term “universe” for it did not mean what itmeans today at all times.The conception of the universe in the West until the end of the medieval period wasgeocentric. It was mainly Aristotelian in origin. The earth was deemed to be the fixed centre of the universe and the moon, the planets, the sun and the stars were believed to move withuniform circular velocity in crystalline spheres around it. The universe was also finite in spatialextent. Apollonius and Ptolemy made some minor adjustments in an attempt to account forsome of the movements of the planets but the basic conceptions remained the same.3

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->