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Do You Know Enough To Enlist?

Do You Know Enough To Enlist?

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Published by scotsman33
A pro-peace educational brochure
A pro-peace educational brochure

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Categories:Types, Brochures
Published by: scotsman33 on Jul 26, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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12/01/2009

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enlist?
Military recruiters andads promise
üü
job training ...
üü
money for college ...
üü
adventure...
üü
leadership skillsand more.
IF YOU DECIDE TO ENLIST 
Do not sign any papers
until you take themhome for a parent, teacher, or someone else whom you know and trust to review.
Make sure to get all the recruiter’s prom-ises in writing
in your enlistment agreement.Spoken promises will not protect you.
Find out
 whether you need to pass a special test, get a security clearance, or do anything elsebefore you can get the job or options you want.
If you’ve already signed up through theDelayed Enlistment Program (DEP)
and arehaving second thoughts, call the GI Rights Hot-line at 800/394-9544. This is a free nongovern-mental service.
Keep this brochure.
If you have problems in the military, call the GI Rights Hotline.
LEARN MORE
To learn more about these issues, check outour web site. It offers up-to-date informationabout military recruitment, what it is like inside the military, and alternatives to the military.
 www.afsc.org/youthmil.htm
Local Contact:
IF YOU TALK WITH A RECRUITER
Don’t rely only on the recruiter.
Military recruiters are salespeople: their jobis to “sell” you on enlistment. To keep their jobsand advance their careers, most recruiters mustsign up a specific number of people each month.They stress the benefits of the military — not the problems. Your decision about enlistment will affect your life and the lives of others.
Don’t rush.
üü
 
Talk with recently discharged veterans — both those who had good experiences and those who didn’t — about the questions raised in this brochure.
üü
Talk with a civilian counselor who can help you think about the military or suggest other op- tions.
 Take along a relative or friend.
 You have a lot to think about when you talk  with a recruiter. A family member or friend can take notes, ask questions, and watch out for your best interests. Also take along a relative or friendif you discuss job selection with a military “guid-ance counselor” at a Military Entrance Process-ing Station (MEPS).
Never give false information or cover upanything.
Be honest about police records, health prob-lems, and school. If you lie to a recruiter,
 you
willsuffer when the truth comes out.It’s wrong, and in some cases illegal, for a recruiter to tell you a lie. Report any recruiter  who does this to your Congress members andschool officials. You will be protecting yourself and others.
enlist?
Do youknowenoughto
Before you join, take agood look at what you’regetting into.
Published by the American FriendsService CommitteeNational Youth and Militarism Program1501 Cherry Street, Phila., PA 19102Phone: 215/241-7176
 youthmil@afsc.org
December 2000
Photos by Terry Foss & Melissa Elliott
Center on Conscience & War1830 Connecticut Ave. NWWashington, DC 20009www.CenteronConscience.orgPh: 202-483-2220

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