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Life-Sustaining Technologies and the Elderly

Life-Sustaining Technologies and the Elderly

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Published by Chris Nash
The dramatic advances in life-sustaining medical technologies during the past three decades have been accompanied by rapid expansion in their availability and use. As equipment and procedures have been refined and experience accumulated, the necessary personnel, facilities, and reimbursement have expanded, and the clinical criteria guiding use have been broadened. The types of patients who become candidates for lifesustaining treatments have changed, and their numbers have increased sharply. Many of these patients are elderly. As the population ages, as once “extraordinary” measures become commonplace, and as ever-more powerful technologies emerge, it becomes increasingly important to understand the problems as well as the potential associated with the use of these technologies and to devise policies that reflect this understanding.
The dramatic advances in life-sustaining medical technologies during the past three decades have been accompanied by rapid expansion in their availability and use. As equipment and procedures have been refined and experience accumulated, the necessary personnel, facilities, and reimbursement have expanded, and the clinical criteria guiding use have been broadened. The types of patients who become candidates for lifesustaining treatments have changed, and their numbers have increased sharply. Many of these patients are elderly. As the population ages, as once “extraordinary” measures become commonplace, and as ever-more powerful technologies emerge, it becomes increasingly important to understand the problems as well as the potential associated with the use of these technologies and to devise policies that reflect this understanding.

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Categories:Types, School Work
Published by: Chris Nash on Jul 26, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/09/2014

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 Life-Sustaining Technologies and the Elderly
July 1987
NTIS order #PB87-222527
 
Recommended Citation:
U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment,
 Life-Sustaining Technologies and the Elder-
ly, OTA-BA-30
(Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, July
1987).
Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 87-619835For sale by the Superintendent of DocumentsU.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402-9325(order form can be found in the back of this report)
 
Foreword
In September 1984, OTA received requests from both the House and Senate Aging Committeesto study the implications for their constituents of medical technologies that can sustain life inpatients who are critically or terminally ill. Both Committee Chairmen, Senator John Heinz andCongressman Edward Roybal, expressed concern about elderly persons whose rights as patientsand dignity as citizens are, or are feared to be, jeopardized —either by unwanted aggressive medicaltreatment or, conversely, by financial barriers to treatment.The Senate Special Committee on Aging cited “new questions about the quality of life” thataccompanies increased survival made possible by “current and emerging methods of life support .“The Committee requested a “thorough review of the ethical dilemmas concerning life and deathdecisions that are faced by health care practitioners, elderly patients themselves, and concernedfamily members. ”OTA was asked to explore the special problems related to treatment decisionsfor older patients who are cognitively impaired and, thus, unable to make their own decisions,and to compare alternate methods for specifying in advance one’s wishes regarding treatment.The Senate Committee also expressed interest in comparative reviews of the various institutionaland noninstitutional settings in which life-sustaining technologies are used.The House Select Committee on Aging identified as the key issues those related to ‘(financialaccess” to life-sustaining technologies and the “right to choose.”Of special interest were waysto ensure that elderly persons retain autonomy in treatment decisions, and the roles of families,providers, and government in supporting patient autonomy. Ethical issues related to the use of technologies that are currently available or anticipated were to be reviewed to advance under-standing about care of the critically and terminally ill elderly. OTA was asked to assess the coststo patients, their families, and the public, and to lay the groundwork for policies about Medicareand Medicaid reimbursement of these technologies. Also of interest to the House Committee werethe growing use of home care and issues related to quality of care, especially in the home.In response, OTA has conducted a study of a wide range of topics, some of which have recentlybeen receiving a great deal of scrutiny inside and outside the government. In order to deriveinformation specific enough to guide possible congressional action and to be responsive to therequesting Committees, this examination of the issues is specifically tied to particular life-sustainingtechnologies and their use with patients who are
elderly.
At the same time, much of this informationis applicable to life-sustaining technology in general and to citizens of all ages.OTA has tried to provide a strong sense of the human dimension in this report. In additionto descriptions of what is theoretically possible and statistically documentable, much informationis presented about the experience of individual patients and their families. The case examples,of which there are many, are true stories. While no case is “typical,” every one expresses thepotential benefits or the potential burdens of life-sustaining treatments. Each makes clear andpoignant the needs of patients, their families, and caregivers who are faced with decisions about-orthe consequences of decisions about—the use of life-sustaining technologies.
iii

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