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Elementary and Secondary Education for Science and Engineering

Elementary and Secondary Education for Science and Engineering

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Published by Chris Nash
All scientists and engineers were once children: Families, communities, and the ideas and images presented by books, magazines, and television helped form their attitudes, encouraged their interest, and guided them to their careers. Schools refined their talents and interests, prepared them academically, and gave them confidence by recognizing their aptitude and achievement. The importance of families and other out-ofschool influences on this process can hardly be overemphasized. Students form opinions and learn about science and scientists from families and friends, from the media, and from places such as science centers and museums, summer camps, and summer research experience. Equally, families, friends, and the media can dull interest in science. Nevertheless, it is largely schools, through preparatory courses in mathematics and science, testing methods, and teaching practices, that determine how many young people will prepare sufficiently well for science and engineering careers (and for other careers). It is in the Nation’s interest to see that schools provide the widest possible opportunities, and the best possible educational foundations for the’ study of science and engineering.
All scientists and engineers were once children: Families, communities, and the ideas and images presented by books, magazines, and television helped form their attitudes, encouraged their interest, and guided them to their careers. Schools refined their talents and interests, prepared them academically, and gave them confidence by recognizing their aptitude and achievement. The importance of families and other out-ofschool influences on this process can hardly be overemphasized. Students form opinions and learn about science and scientists from families and friends, from the media, and from places such as science centers and museums, summer camps, and summer research experience. Equally, families, friends, and the media can dull interest in science. Nevertheless, it is largely schools, through preparatory courses in mathematics and science, testing methods, and teaching practices, that determine how many young people will prepare sufficiently well for science and engineering careers (and for other careers). It is in the Nation’s interest to see that schools provide the widest possible opportunities, and the best possible educational foundations for the’ study of science and engineering.

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Categories:Types, School Work
Published by: Chris Nash on Jul 26, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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09/06/2012

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 Elementary and Secondary Education for Science and Engineering
December 1988
NTIS order #PB89-139182
 
Recommended Citation:
U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment,
 Elementary and Secondary Education for Science and Engineering-A Technical Memorandum, OTA-TM-SET-41
(Washington,DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, December 1988).
Library of Congress Catalog Card Number
88-600594
For sale by the Superintendent of DocumentsU.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402-9325(order form can be found in the back of this technical memorandum)
 
Foreword
Choice, chance, opportunity, and environment are all factors that determine whetheror not a child will grow up to be a scientist or engineer. Though comprising only 4percent of our work force, scientists and engineers are critical to our Nation’s continuedstrength and vitality. As a Nation, we are concerned about maintaining an adequatesupply of people with the ability to enter these fields, and the desire to do so.In response to a request from the House Committee on Science and Technology,this technical memorandum analyzes recruitment into and retention in the science andengineering pipeline. Elementary
 and Secondary Education for Science and Engineer-ing
supplements and extends OTA’s June 1988 report,
 Educating Scientists and Engi- neers: Grade School to Grad School.
Students make many choices over a long period, and choose a career through acomplicated process. This process includes formal instruction in mathematics and sci-ence, and the opportunity for informal education in museums, science centers, and recrea-tional programs. The influence of family, teachers, peers, and the electronic media canmake an enormous difference. This memorandum analyzes these influences. Becauseeducation is “all one system, ” policymakers interested in nurturing scientists and engi-neers must address the educational environment as a totality; changing only one partof the system will not yield the desired result.The Federal Government plays a key role in sustaining educational excellence inelementary and secondary education, providing effective research, and encouragin
g
change. This memorandum identifies pressure points in the system and strengthens theanalytical basis for policy.
Director
 
Ill

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