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cap08

cap08

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Published by: lidianycs on Nov 11, 2010
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VECTOR MECHANICS FOR ENGINEERS:
 STATICS
Eighth EditionFerdinand P. Beer E. Russell Johnston, Jr.Lecture Notes:J. Walt Oler Texas Tech University
CHAPTER
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights rese
8
Friction
 
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics
i      g t     d i     t    i     on
 
Contents
IntroductionLaws of Dry Friction. Coefficients of Friction.Angles of FrictionProblems Involving Dry FrictionSample Problem 8.1Sample Problem 8.3WedgesSquare-Threaded ScrewsSample Problem 8.5Journal Bearings. Axle Friction.Thrust Bearings. Disk Friction.Wheel Friction. Rolling Resistance.Sample Problem 8.6Belt Friction.Sample Problem 8.8
 
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics
i      g t     d i     t    i     on
 
Introduction
In preceding chapters, it was assumed that surfaces in contact wereeither 
 frictionless
(surfaces could move freely with respect to eachother) or 
rough
(tangential forces prevent relative motion betweensurfaces).Actually, no perfectly frictionless surface exists. For two surfacesin contact, tangential forces, called
 friction forces
, will develop if one attempts to move one relative to the other.However, the friction forces are limited in magnitude and will not prevent motion if sufficiently large forces are applied.The distinction between frictionless and rough is, therefore, a matter of degree.There are two types of friction:
dry
or 
Coulomb friction
and
 fluid  friction
. Fluid friction applies to lubricated mechanisms. The present discussion is limited to dry friction between nonlubricatedsurfaces.

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