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SA-9 Pegasus-Saturn I Press Kit

SA-9 Pegasus-Saturn I Press Kit

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Published by Bob Andrepont
NASA press kit for eighth Saturn I launch.
NASA press kit for eighth Saturn I launch.

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Published by: Bob Andrepont on Nov 11, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11/21/2012

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NATIONAL
AMRt
NAUTI(S
AND
SPACE
ADMINISTRATION
TELS
W
h
WASHINGTON,
D
C
20546
W
-''i
FOR
RELEASEt
MONDAY
PM'S
A
NFebruary
15,
1965
RELEASE
NO:
65-38
R
PRS
.
PEGASUS
-
SATURN
I
CONTENTS
S
GENERAL
RELEASE
3
BACKGROUND
INFORMATION......................
Flight
Sequence,.,.--,...................
4-5
Pegasus
Satellite
.....
........................
6-9
OtherIndustrial
Participants...............
10-11
SA-9Launch
Vehicle
..................
12-17
Launch
Preparations........................,
18-19
Pegasus
Tracking
&
Data Acquisition.........20-22Network
Configuration
andControl
..........
23
K
I
Scheduled
to
be
launched
no
sooner
than
Feb.
16.
 
NATIONAL
AERONAUTICS
AND
SPACE
ADMINISTRATION
TELS
WO
-
,
WASHINGTON,
D C
20546
WO
1-o9
FOR
RELEASE:
MONDAYPM'
S
February
15,
19b5
RELEASE
NO:
65-38
SATURN
I
TOLAUNCHPEGASUS
METEOROIDDETECTIONSATELLITE
The
NationalAeronautics
and
Space
Administration
will
launch
the
firstPegasus
meteoroiddetection
satellite
using
a
Saturn
I
fromCapeKennedy,
Fla.,
no
soonerthan
Feb.
16,
1965.
Pegasus,the
largest
unmannedinstrumented
satellitedeveloped
byNASA,
will
be
launched
on
the
eighthSaturn
I
flight.
Vehicleperformance
will
provide
additional
informa-
tionand
experiencetoward
development
of
the
larger
Saturn
IBand
Saturn
V
vehicles.
All
previous
Saturn
I
flightsweresuccessful.
The
Pegasussatellite
will"sweep"
space,
detecting
and
reportingcollisions
withmeteoroids.
The
information
obtained
willgive
scientists
a
betterindication
of
the
dis-
tribution,
size
and
velocity
of
such
particlesnear
the
Earth.
Pegasuswillorbit
the
Earthevery
97
minutes,
ranging
in
altitudefromabout
310
to
465
statutemilesandinclined31.7degrees
to
theequator.-more-
2/11/65
 
-2-
The
large
panels
which
the
satellite
willexpose
to
the
meteoroidenvironment
resemble
a
pair
of"wjngs."
The
structure
(in
orbit)
will
be
96
by
l14
feet
and
have
more
than
2,300
squarefeet
of
instrumented
surface.
As
particles
collidewith
the
surface
of
Ihe
panels,
theywill
be
regis-
teredandreported
to
Earth.
Desired
lifetime
of
the
solar-poweredsatellite
is
one
year,
although
it
may
orbitthreeor
more
years.
Exposure
cf
the
largepanelareaover
a
long
periodwill
give
the
designers
of
mannedand
unmanned
spacecraft
a
goodsam-
ple
ofmieteoroid
data.To
date,
small.
samples
of
suchdata
fiave
been
gathered
by
Explorers
XVI
and
XXIII
which
are
about
lj80
the
size
ofPegasus.
Outwardly,
the
vehicle-spacecraft
in
place
on
the
launch
pad
will
appear
identical
to
the
previous
two
Saturn
I
test
7ehicles,
SA--6
and
7.
Apollo
command
arid
service
module
boilerplate
spacecraftandlaunchescapesystem
tower
will
De
atop
the
Sarurn
vehicle.
Pegasus
will
be
folded
inside
the
specially
adapted
b'ollerplate
service
module.
After
in-
Jection
tato
crb4.t,
the
command
and
service
modules
quill
be
jettisonedand
the
satellitewill
be
free
to
deploy
its
panels.-more-
i.L________________________-_
_-

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