Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more ➡
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Add note
Save to My Library
Sync to mobile
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
×
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Lunar Orbiter D Press Kit

Lunar Orbiter D Press Kit

Ratings: (0)|Views: 663|Likes:
Published by Bob Andrepont
NASA press kit for Lunar Orbiter 4 mission
NASA press kit for Lunar Orbiter 4 mission

More info:

Published by: Bob Andrepont on Nov 13, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See More
See less

11/01/2012

pdf

text

original

 
fI
E1NAOlNAL
A[IRNAUTI(S
AND
SPACE
ADMINISTRATION
W()
N,
-
WASH-INGTON
DC
2Es46
W(T
-.
WFOR
RELEASE:
TUESDAY
A.M.
May
2,
1967
RELEASE
NO:
67-101
PROJECT:
LMNAR
ORBITER
D
(To
be
launched
no
earlier
than
May
4,
1967)
CONTENTS
GENERAL
RELEASE----------------------------------------1-7
LUNAR
ORBITER
PROJECT-------------------------------8-9
ORBITER
SPACECRAFTCONFIGURATION
----------------------
10
Camera
System---------------------------------------10-11
PhotoTaking
Process
------------------------------
11-12
Photo
Readout
Process------------------------------12-14
tEletrical
Power
System-----------------------------15
lAtttude
Control
System
--------------------------
16-19
Velocity
Control
System----------------------------19-20
Communications
System------------------------------21-22
Temperature
Control
System--------------------------22-23
LUNAR
ORBITER
TASKS
-----
-------------------------------
24-25
Lunar
Photography------------------------------------25-27
Selenodesy----------------------------------------27-28
Meteoroid
Measurements-----------------------------28-29
Radiation
Measurements------------------------------29
ATLAS-AGENA
D
LAUNCH
VEHICLE---------------------------30-31
DEEPSPACE
NETWORK-------------------------------------32-33
DatE
Alquisition------------------------------------33
Data
Evaluation-------------------------------------34
ATIAS-AGENA
D/LUNAR
ORBITER
D
MISSION------------------35
Countdown
Events-----------------------------------35
Flight
Events
Summary------------------------------36
*
Launch
Vehicle
Flight-------------------------------37
F
irst
Spacecraft
Events----------------------------38
*
Lunar
Orbit
Injection
-----------------------------
39
LUNAR
ORBITER
AND
ATLAS-AGENA
TEAMS-------------------40-44
T
-0-
4/26/67
 
NATIONAL
AERONAUTICS
AND
SPACE
ADMINISTRATION
TELS
WO2-4155
NEWS
I
WASHINGTON,D.C.
20546
T
WO
3-6925
FOR
RELEASE:
TUESDAY
A.M.'s
May
2,
1967
RELEASE
NO:
67-101
LUNAR
ORBITER
D
SECOND
MISSIONIN
THREE
WEEKS
The
United
States
is
preparing
to
launch
a
photographic
laboratoryspacecraft
for
the
second
automated
spacecraft mis-sion
to the
Moonwithin
three
weeks.
Lunar
Orbiter
D
is
scheduled
for
launch
by
the
NationalAeronautics
and
Space
Administration
within
the
periodMay
4
-
7.
Surveyor
III
soft-landed
on the
Moonafter
its
launch
April
17.
Lunar
Orbiterspacecraft
are
flown
to
continue
the
efforts
made
with
Ranger
and
Surveyor
flights
to
acquireknowledge
of
the
Moon's
surface. The
firstthree
Lunar Orbitermissions
were
in
direct support
of
the
Apollo and Surveyor
lunarland-
ing
programs;
theyidentified
eightareas
in
which potential
manned
landing locations
exist.
The fourth
Orbiter
mission
will
be
a
broad photographicsurvey
ofthe
entire
frontside of the Moon,
with additional
photography
of
hidden
side
areas
scheduled
as well.
-more-
4/26/67
 
-2-
The
860-pound
Orbiter
will
belaunched
by
an
Atlas-
Agena
D
vehiclefrom
Cape
Kennedy,
Fla.,
on
a
flight
to the
vicinity
of
the
Moonwhich
will
take
about
89
hours.
When
successfully
injected
on
its
translunar
trajectory,
it
willbe
designatedLunar
Orbiter
IV.
The
broad,
systematic
surveyof
lunar surface
features
is
designed
to
increase
scientific
knowledge
of
thenature
and
origin
of
the
Moonand
of the
processes
by
which
its
sur-face
was
formed
and
modified.
The
survey
will
supply
the
basis
for
planning
andselecting
sites
for detailed
scien-
tific
study by
lateir
orbital
and
landingmissions.
Itis
expected
that
more
than
80
percent
of
the
front
face
ofthe
Moon
will be
photographed
in
sufficientresolu-tion to
show
surfacefeatures
as small
as
200
feetacross.
The
pictures
will be
about
10
times
more
detailed
than
the
best
Earth-basedphotographsmade
through
telescopes.Inad-dition,
photographs
of
the
Moon's
polar
regionsat lesserreso-lution
will
completecoverage
of
the
fullfront
face.
Photography
on the
hidden
side
of
the
Moon
will
provide
pictures
of
object3
400
feet
and
larger,
and
willfill
out
the
coverage
begunby
Lunar Orbiters
I,
II,
and
III.
It
is
planned
to
cover
more
than
90
percent
of
the
hidden
side.
-more-

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->