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Mariner I Press Kit

Mariner I Press Kit

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Published by Bob Andrepont
NASA press kit for unsuccessful Mariner 1 mission
NASA press kit for unsuccessful Mariner 1 mission

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Published by: Bob Andrepont on Nov 13, 2010
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11/13/2010

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N
EWS
R
ELEASE
NATIONAL
AERONAUTICS
AND
SPACE
ADMINISTRATION
400
MARYLAND
AVENUE,
SW,
WASHINGTON
25,
D C.
TELEPHONES
WORTH
2-4155-WORTH
3-1110
FORRELEASE:
THURSDAY
A"M's
July
19,
].9b62
Belease
No.
62-157MARINER
SPACECRAFTMariner
I,
the
firstof
a
series
ofspacecraft
designed
for
interplanetary
exploration,
will
be
launched
within
a
few
days
(no
earlier
than
July
21)
from
the
Atlantic
Missile
Range,Cape
Canaveral,
Fla.,
by
the
National
Aeronautics
and
,,,ace
Adminlstration.The
mission
of
the
initial
Mariner
is
to
fly
by
the
planet
Venus
and make
infrared
and
microwavemeasurements
of
the
planet;
communicate
this
infor-
matron
to
earth
over
an
interplanetary
distance
of
36
million
miles,and
obtain
data
on
interplanetary
phenomena
during
the
trip
to
Venus.
The
closestapproach
ofMariner
to
Venus
will
beabout
10,000
miles.Five
scientific
experiments
will
be
aboard
the
Mariner
to
provide
data
on
deep
space
during
the
ex-
tended
flight.
Plighttimes
wall
vary
from
100
to
1)10
days
depending
on
the
launch
date.
Project
Management
for the
Venus Mission
was
assigned
to
the
CaliforniaInstituteofTechnology
Jet
Propulsion
Laboratory
by
the
NationalAeronauticsand
mpace
Administration.
Thisincludes responsi-
bility
for
the
spacecraft
system
and space
flight
operations.
The
Marshall
Space
Flight
Center
has
the
responsibility
for
providing
the
launchvehicle,with
the
support of
the
U.S.A.F.
SpaceSystemsDivision.
 
TheAtlas
D
firststage
is
providedby
General
DynamicsAstronautics,
and
the
Agena
B
second
stage
is
providedbyLockheedMissiles
and
Space
Company.
FKey
personnel
in
the
Mariner
Project
are:
Fred
D.
Kochendorfer,MarinerProgram
Chief,
NASA
Headquarters;
D.L.
Forsythe,
AgenaProgram
Chief;
Robert
J.
Parks,
PlanetaryProgramDirector
for
JPL;
J.N.
James,
JPL,
Mariner
ProjectManager;
W. A.
Collier,
JPL,
Assistant
ProjectManager,Dan
Schneiderman,
JPL,
SpacecraftSystem
Manager;
Friedrich
Duerr,
MSFC,
LaunchVehicle
SystemsManager;
Major
J. G.
Albert,
Mariner
Launch
VehicleDirector
for AFSSD;
and
H. T.
Luskin,
Director
for
NASAPrograms,
LockheedMissiles
andSpaceCompany.
NASA
has
assigned
two
launches
for
Mariner
to
take
advantageof
the
periodduringwhichVenus
will
be close
to
earth
this
year.Thenext launch
opportunity
for
Venusoccurs
in 1964.
Mariner
2
is
at
Cape
Canaveral
andwill
be
launched
as
soon
as
possibleafter
Mariner
1.
The
major
factor
in the
decision
to
launch
two
Mariners
is
the
difficult
nature
of
the
mission.This
mission
is.
a
difficult
one
because
of
several
factors:
the
long
lifeof
the
flight,
extend-
ing
up
to
140
days;the
spacecraft
willbe
subjected
to
a
prolongedvariation
in
temperaturecausedby
the
variation
in
distance
from
the
sun
and
increasingintensity
of
the
sun;
radiationeffects
in
interplane-
taryspace
are
not
fullyknown,and
the
difficulty
of
transmitting
a
considerable
amount
ofinformation
over
an
extreme
range.
Mariner
tracking
and
communication
will
be
pro-
vided
byJPL's
Deep
Space
InstrumentationFacility
with
permanent
stations
at
Goldstone,California,Woomera,Australia,and
Johannesburg,
South
Africa
and
mobilestations
at
Cape
Canaveral
and
near
the
permanentstation
at
Johannesburg.Data
flowinginto
these
stations
from
the
spacecraft
willbe
routed
to
JPL's
SpacecraftFlightOperationsCenter
for
correlationby
an
IBM
7090computer
system.
3PACECRAFTDESCRIPTION
The
Marinerweighs
446
pounds
and,in the
launchposition,
Is
xive
feet-in-diameter
atthe
baseand
9
feet,
11
inches
in
height.
In
the
cruiseposition,with
solar
panels
and
high-gainantenna
extended,
itis
16.5
feet
across
in
spanand
11
feet,
11
inches
in
height.
-2
-
 
The
design
is
a variation
of
the
hexagonalconcept
used
for
the
Ranger
series. The
hexagonframework base houses
a
liquid
fuel
rocket
motor,for
trajectory
correction,
and
six
modules
contain-
ingthe
attitude control
system,
electronic circuitry
for the
scientific experiments, power
supply,
battery
and charger,
data
encoder
and
command subsystem,digital
computer
andsequencer,and
radio
transmitter
and receiver.
"uri
sensors
and
attitude control
jets
are
mounted
on the
exterior
of
the
base hexagon.
A
tubular superstructureextends
upward
fromthe
base hexagon.
Scientific experiments
are
attached
to
this
framework.
An
omnidirectional
antenna
is
mounted
at the
peak
of
the
superstructure.
A
parabolic,
high-gain antenna
is
hinge-mounted below
the
base
hexagon.Two solar panels
are
also
hinged
to
the
base hexagon.They
fold
up
alongside
the
spacecraft
during
launch,
parking orbitand
injection
and
are
folded
down, like
butterfly
wings,when
the
craft
is
in space.
A command
antenna
for
receiving
transmissions
from
earth
is
mounted
on one
of
thepanels.The
solar panels contain 9800 solar cells
in
27
square
feet
of
area.
They will collect energy
from
the
sun and
convert
it
into
electrical power
at
a
minimum
of
148
watts and
a
maximum
of
222
watts. The
amount
of
power
available
from
the
panels
is
expected
to
increase
slightly
during
the
mission
due
tothe
increased
intensity of
the
sun.
Each solar
cell has
a protective
glass filter
that
reduces
the
amount
of
heat
absorbed
from
the
sun,
but
does not
interfere
with
the
energy
conversion
process. The
glasscoversfilterout
the
sun's
ultraviolet
and
infrared
radiation
that
would
produce
heat but
not
electrical
energy.
Prior
to
deployment
of
the
solar
panels,
power
will
be
supplied by a
33.3-pound
silver-zinc
rechargeable
battery with
a
capacity
of
1000
wattnours.
The
rechargecapability
is
used
to
meet
the
long-term
power
requirements
of
the
Venus
Mission.
The
battery
will
supply power
directly
for
switching
and
sharing
peak-loadswith
the
solarpanels
andalso
supply power during
trajectory
correction
when
the
panels
will not
be
directed
at the
sun.
The
power
subsystem
will
convert
electricity
from
the
solarpanels
and
battery
to
50
volt,
2400
cps;
26 volt,400
cps,
and25.8
to
33.3
volt
DC.
-3-

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