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Tiros Vi Press Kit

Tiros Vi Press Kit

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Published by Bob Andrepont
NASA press kit for TIROS 6
NASA press kit for TIROS 6

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Published by: Bob Andrepont on Nov 14, 2010
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11/14/2010

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*
NEWS
RELEASE
NATIONAL
AERONAUTICS
AND
SPACE
ADMINISTRATION
aA
400
MARYLAND
AVENUE,
SW,
WASHINGTON
25,
D C.
TELEPHONES
WORTH
2-4155-
WORTH
3-
1110
FOR
RELEASE:
Sunday
Release
No.
62-194September
16,
1962
SIXTHTIROS
SCHEDULED
FOR
LAUNCHThesixthTIROS
meteorological
satellite
is
scheduled
to
be
launched
by
the
NationalAeronauticsandSpace
Administration
not
earlierthanSeptember
18,
1962,
atthe
Atlantic
Missile
Range,
Cape
Canaveral,Florida.
If
the
launching
is
successful,
it
will
mark
the
sixthtimein
as
many
attemptsthat
a U.S.
meteorological
satellitehasbeen
placed
inorbit,
establishing
a
recordunmatchedby
anyotherNASA
spacecraft
system.
Similarly,
it
will
set
a
new
reliability
recordfor
the
Delta
boostervehicle
whichwillhaveorbited
11
satellitesin
a
row
--
an
unprecedentedrecord
for
U.S.
rocketry.
Launching
of
the
TIROS
is
timed
to
permit
maximum
coverage
by
the
satellite's
two
TV
cameras
of
tropicalstormareas
i~n
the
Atlantic
andPacificOceansduring
thelast
half
of
the1962
hurri-cane
season.
It
is
expected
to
operatethrough
December.
TIROS
V,
launched
on
June
19,
this
year,has
provided
coverageover
hurricaneandtyphoon
areas
in the
Atlanticand
PacificOceansduring
thefirst
portion
ofthe
1962
season.The
useful
lifetime
of
a
TIROSsatelliteaveragesaboutfourmonths.
Although
the
wide-angle
TV
camera
in
TIROS
V
continues
to
oper-
ate,
the
medium-angleTegea
lens
hasnot
functioned
since
July
6th
because
of
a
randomelectrical
failure
in
the
camera's
system.
In
view
of
the
importance
of
the
TIROS'
cloudcoverphotographsduring
thetime
of
greatest
hurricane
andtyphoon
activity
(June
throughNovember),
a
backup
TIROS
was
scheduled
in
order
that
coveragewouldnot
be
interrupted.Therefore,
although
originallyforecastfor
launching
inNovember,
the
sixthTIROS
was
moved
upto
September.
Because
of
this
change,the
TIROS
will
notbe
equipped
to
conduct
in-
frared
experiments.FutureTIROSsatellites
are
programmed
tocarry
 
infrared
equipmentand will continue
radiated
and
reflected
energystudiessimilar
to
thoseconducted
by
earlier TIROSspacecraft.
A
September
launchingdate
was
selected
in
orderthat
the
TIROSTV
photographic
data could also support
the
Mercury-Atlas
8
launch-
ing,
now
scheduledfor laterin September.During the first
two
weeks
of its
anticipated
four-month
life-time,the
TIROScameras willbe
pointed
at
the
NorthernHemisphere.Afterthis14-dayperiod,
the
cameras willscan
the
Southern
Hemi-sphere for about
30
days
before
returning
to
coverage
of
the
North-ern
Hemisphere
onceagain.The
new
TIROS
will
weigh
281
pounds.Compensatingweight
has
been
included
to make up forthe
infra-red
equipment.Like TIROS
V,
it
willbe
launched
into
a
circular
orbit
--
about
402
miles
(350
nautical
miles)above theearth
--
with
an angle
of
inclination
of
58degrees to the equator.
It
will
orbit the
earth
once
every
hourand
37
minutes.TheTIROS
program
has
met with
unprecedented
success
since
its
inception
in
April
1960
with
the
launching
of
TIROS
I.
To
date the
TIROS
system
has:
1.
Demonstrated
that
the
meteorological
satelliteconcept
is
practical
from an
engineering
standpoint.
2.
Provided cloud cover
photographs
on
a
"real-time"basisfor immediate use
in
daily weatherforecasts, opening
a
new
era in
weather
forecasting.
3.
Identified
hurricanes
andtyphoons,located them
with
respect toland
masses
and followed their movement.
4.
Distinguished
itself
as
a
vehiclefor
ice
study
and
ice
reconnaissance.
5.
Provided data leading
to
the
eventual development
of
an
automated
cloud
patternidentification
system,
based
on
the
shape and brightness
of
clouds.
6.
Obtained
data
for
the
measurement
Of
solar
radiation
of
the earth's atmosphere.NASA's
Goddard
Space Flight
Center,
Greenbelt,Maryland,
is
re-
sponsible for overalltechnical
direction
of
the
TIROS program,
in-
cluding
tracking
and data acquisition.
The
National
Weather
SatelliteCenter
of
the
U. S.
Weather
Bureau
is
responsible
for
the
operationaluse
of
the
photographic
dataand
for
related research.
-2
-
 
THE
TIROS
SPACECRAFT
The
TIROSspacecraft
is
shaped
like
an
18-sided
bass
drum.
It
is
22
inches
high
and
42
inches
in
diameter.The
sides
and
top
of
the
spacecrafthave9,120solar
cells
which
provideelectricalpower
for
63
nickel-cadrium
batteries.Over
one-quarter
of
its
281pounds
is
structural
weight.
Protrudingfrom
the
top
of
thespace-craft
is
an
18-inchreceiving
antenna,
Atthe
bottom,arefour22-inch
transmitting
antennas
spaced
at
90
degreeintervals.Exceptfor
the
omission
of
the
infrared
equipment,
the
space-
craft
is
the
same
as
TIROS
V.
Its
basic
weather-observing
instru-
ments
include
recordingtelevision
camerasand
theirtransmitters,receivers
andcontrol
circuitry.
The
term
TIROS
meansTelevision
InfraRed
Observation
Satellite.
TV
CAMERA
SYSTEM
The
heart
of
the
TIROS
system
consists
of
two
independenttele-vision
camerasystems.
One
uses
a
wide-angle
(104
degrees)Elgeetlenscapable
of
photographingan
area
in
excess
of
600,000
squaremiles,
or
a
square
area
of
about750
miles
on
each
side.
Thesec-ondsystemuses
a
medium-angle
(76
degrees)
Tegea
lens
which
covers
anarea
of
approximately232,000
squaremiles,
or
about
450
miles
on
each
side.
Both
camerasuseone-halfinch
Vidicon
tubeswhichwere
especiallydeveloped
fortheTIROS
spacecraftand
which
retain
still
photographstemporarily
on
the
tube.
Anelectron
beam
con-vertsthe"stored"
photographs
into
a
TV-type
signal
which
can
be
transmitteddirectly
tothe
ground
stations
or
recorded
on
magnetic
tapefor
read-outwhen
the
spacecraft
is
within
the
required
1,500
mile
radiorange
of
the
ground
stations.
Each
tape
recorder
with
its
400-foot-long
tapecan
record
up
to32
picturesduringan
orbit.
Thetwo
TV
camerasystemscan
be
operatedseparately
or
simultaneously.Operation
ofthe
cameras
is
based
on
commandssent
fromground
stations
which
set
timerssimilar
to
ordinaryalarm
clocksinthespacecraft.Thesesettings
trigger
the
cameras
when
the
satellitepasses
overanareafrom
whichphotographs
aredesired.
Then,
when
it
is
withinrange
of
the
ground
stations,
read-out
occurs.Complete
groundstationread-out
of
thetapes
from
each
camera
takesaboutthreeminutes.The
processautomatically
erasesthe
tapes,
which
are
thenrewoundandready
for
the
next
orbit.
Control
Systems
Four
basic
controlsystems
are
integrated
into
the
TIROSspace-
craft.The
first
is
the
horizon
scanner
whichusesaninfrared
-3-

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