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HOW TO PLAN FOR AN EMERGENCY!

HOW TO PLAN FOR AN EMERGENCY!

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Published by Burt Gummer
Some years back, Lisa Thiesse, like many of us, realized she needed to prepare her family for the times ahead. One weekend she "threw together" this manual to organize her efforts. Others folks found out about it and asked for a copy. As a result, she has given away hundreds of copies via email. Best I have found in a long time!
Some years back, Lisa Thiesse, like many of us, realized she needed to prepare her family for the times ahead. One weekend she "threw together" this manual to organize her efforts. Others folks found out about it and asked for a copy. As a result, she has given away hundreds of copies via email. Best I have found in a long time!

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Published by: Burt Gummer on Jul 30, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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01/31/2013

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HOW TO PLAN FOR AN EMERGENCY
by Lisa Thiesse
KEY TOPICS:First ConsiderationsIf You Plan To Leave the CityEmergency Foods, Packs, Clothing and MoneyClothingEating Utensils, Plate and BowlBedding and Sleeping BagFirst Aid KitMoneyPortable KitchenBeltFoodFreezing, Canning, DehydratingFinal Notes - WeaponsLittle Things To Do - TipsCommon SenseContact Lisa
First and for most, you need to know what it is you want to do.
Where is your safe place(s)?
Where is your 'dig in' site?
What is your particular situation?
o
Do you live in an apartment?
o
Do you live in the city?
o
Do you live in a small town?
o
Do you live on a farm?
o
Do you have children/pets?
o
Do you have anyone outside your immediate household to care for i.e. elderlyparent, children with previous spouse?All these will be important for YOUR personalized plan. Even the ages of children willmake a difference in what you plan, how you pack, what you need for supplies etc. So, sitdown and start organizing your group on paper.Will your plan mean moving out of the immediate area? That is a personal decision.Things to consider:Generally, in the case of a major earthquake or other catastrophic happening, figure that itwill be 3 - 5 days before help arrives. This is a good rule of thumb to go by.
 
What type of emergency is this? (Storm, bad earthquake, impending hurricane, fire?) Willthis mean extended periods without power, access to safe places?If you plan to stay - Be prepared with at least 72 hours of food, water, a good medicine kit(contents will be described later) flashlight and batteries (lots of batteries) a portable radio(more batteries) candles (buy the emergency candles - they burn long), emergency cash (willbe discussed later) clothes, and other of that type stuff which will be discussed that should goin your MAIN PACKS.If you live in the city and there is a catastrophic type disaster - you will probably need toget out of it. Especially if power is out for extended periods or major damage. If you plan toleave the city -
1. YOU WILL NEED TO HAVE AS MANY ROUTES OUT AS POSSIBLE.
First, plan several places to go. For a family, a meeting place is a must. One just outside yourhome (like you should already have in case of a house fire), one in your neighborhood, oneoutside your neighborhood (in case of major destruction), one in a well known place justinside your city and one outside your city. THIS WAY everyone can move from place to place- leaving notes behind with instructions - and hopefully, picking up everyone on the way.Second, you need to know where it is you will go. Your SAFE PLACE can be a cabin, acampsite, a relatives home, another home you own or lease or another piece of property.{We have two places - both on the other side of the mountains from us - that we can go tothat we either own or are purchasing. We have campsites on the west side of the mountainsand will know different routes to all the places}Third, the routes have to be traveled using different modes. Can't drive your car becauseroads are out? Ride a bike/horse. Can't ride? Walk.Routes have to take in whether they have bridges (which are vulnerable to collapse duringearthquake, mud-slides, floods etc.) . If they become impassable - is there another way?Even if you then have to ride a bike or walk? Think ahead to what and how much you cancarry and good carrying carts, packs etc.
2. YOU WILL NEED TO HAVE ROUTES TO SAFE-PLACES IN THE CITY
IF you plan to stay in town. People with small children may have little choice considering onthe emergency.
3. IF YOU HAVE SCHOOL CHILDREN, MAP ROUTES FOR THEM
in case they are cut off from you during the day and/or they need to walk/ride home - or toprearranged places.
NOW THAT YOU ARE THINKING ALONG THESE LINES CONSIDER THIS!a
. the fewer people around you, the safer you and your family/group will be.
 
b
. the more supplies and routes you have the more choices you have on little notice.
c
. the more first aid, basic and secondary treatments you know the better.
d
. the more you practice the easier to make decisions in emotional circumstances.
e
. KNOW HOW FAR YOU ARE WILLING TO GO. (Will you carry a weapon for self-defense?For hunting for food?) Not a pleasant thought but necessary.
f
. Know the capabilities of those who will travel or be under your care
.
Not only how far canthey walk or ride, but what skills they have. (Someone who has medical knowledge can be abenefit, as can someone who has hunting skills, someone who has plant and other foodgathering skills, someone who has map reading skills etc.) Plan on having each person inyour group learn some of these skills. Even young children can take part. Make it a familyproject and practice them while camping or hiking.
g.
Do not forget your pets
.
Do plan on extra water for them - but most pets can eat whathumans eat so don't burden yourself trying to carry dog food or cat food. Pet birds can ride onyour shoulder or should be set free as other critters may need to be also. (It may mean adeath sentence for them, but if you leave them in their cages it surely would be a slow andpainfully cruel death sentence.) Your animals can also be used for carrying items. Big dogscan carry packs or be trained to pull small wagons. Horses, and other such larger animalscan also be useful - but that goes without saying.
h
. Even if you plan to stay where you are, the following items will fulfill your needs for anemergency plan
.
You have the luxury of not having to worry about how much weight you cancarry - and you may not need emergency rations for as many days. If you plan that you willnot receive outside help, have power or medical aid, nor have the ability to purchase items for3 - 5 days, any help arriving earlier is a boon. You must remember to have at least 1 gallon ofwater for every one of those days per person in storage. (Water can be stored for up to 6months in a unbreakable container before having to be purified or recycled.) Try and stock asmany or all of the items listed below as you may not be able to sleep in your home but haveto camp out in the yard or in one of the your in town safe-places.
Keep these items OUT OFYOUR HOME AND IN A PLACE WHERE YOU WILL KEEP YOUR MAIN PACKS so thatyou can get to them if your home or apartment building is unsafe to enter.
[NOTE: You can use and old refrigerator or large container as a storage area. Halfway oralmost all the way bury it in your back yard without the lid. Take a nice piece of wood orplastic and make a water proof cover over the top of the chest. Plant flowers around it orplace a birdbath or decorate with yard statues. Inside, you can store your waterproofed packsand sleeping bags, your med. kit and other items with little worry of water, insect or vermindamage. If you have a wood shed or other small building they could be ideal for storing. UseBIG plastic garbage cans with locking lids as your storage bins. They are almost completelywater proof - still waterproof by wrapping tarps and plastic bags around your packs andclothing. Other options are, keep them in R.V.s, fifth wheels, or barns.]

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