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Running Story Contests

Running Story Contests

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Published by Terrence Gargiulo
You would be surprised how excited adults can get over sharing stories. An effective technique for eliciting stories from the people in your organization or from your customers is to run a story contest with winners and prizes.

Running a storytelling contest is relatively easy to do, though it will take time and resources. The steps in this paper will walk you through how to set up and carry out a story contest. The paper includes a detailed Case Study for Sodexho.
You would be surprised how excited adults can get over sharing stories. An effective technique for eliciting stories from the people in your organization or from your customers is to run a story contest with winners and prizes.

Running a storytelling contest is relatively easy to do, though it will take time and resources. The steps in this paper will walk you through how to set up and carry out a story contest. The paper includes a detailed Case Study for Sodexho.

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Categories:Types, Business/Law
Published by: Terrence Gargiulo on Nov 16, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11/16/2010

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©2007,
 
Terrence
 
Gargiulo
 
&
 
MAKINGSTORIES.net
 
 –
 
terrence@makingstories.net
 
,
 
415
948
8087
 
RUNNING
 
STORYTELLING
 
CONTESTS
 
Do
 
you
 
remember
 
in
 
grade
 
school
 
having
 
to
 
write
 
or
 
tell
 
“What
 
I
 
did
 
this
 
summer?”
 
Thinking
 
back
 
it
 
may
 
seem
 
silly.
 
In
 
reality,
 
it
 
was
 
simple
 
storytelling.
 
The
 
technique
 
our
 
teachers
 
used
 
of 
 
asking
 
people
 
to
 
share
 
an
 
experience
 
remains
 
 just
 
as
 
powerful
 
even
 
though
 
we’re
 
older.
 
You
 
would
 
be
 
surprised
 
how
 
excited
 
adults
 
can
 
get
 
over
 
sharing
 
stories.
 
An
 
effective
 
technique
 
for
 
eliciting
 
stories
 
from
 
the
 
people
 
in
 
your
 
organization
 
or
 
from
 
your
 
customers
 
is
 
to
 
run
 
a
 
story
 
contest
 
with
 
winners
 
and
 
prizes.
 
Running
 
a
 
storytelling
 
contest
 
is
 
relatively
 
easy
 
to
 
do,
 
though
 
it
 
will
 
take
 
time
 
and
 
resources.
 
The
 
steps
 
below
 
will
 
walk
 
you
 
through
 
how
 
to
 
set
 
up
 
and
 
carry
 
out
 
a
 
story
 
contest.
 
1.
 
Define
 
the
 
purpose
 
of 
 
your
 
contest.
 
What
 
kind
 
of 
 
information
 
do
 
you
 
hope
 
to
 
elicit?
 
Do
 
you
 
want
 
individual
 
stories,
 
stories
 
about
 
the
 
workplace,
 
or
 
about
 
excellent
 
customer
 
service,
 
etc?
 
2.
 
Develop
 
a
 
question
 
that
 
will
 
excite
 
the
 
imagination
 
of 
 
your
 
target
 
audience.
 
Some
 
examples,
 
 
What
 
do
 
I
 
like
 
best
 
about
 
working
 
here?
 
 
How
 
has
 
our
 
product
 
or
 
service
 
improved
 
the
 
quality
 
of 
 
daily
 
life?
 
 
Describe
 
what
 
the
 
future
 
looks
 
like
 
if 
 
we
 
succeed?
 
3.
 
Give
 
thought
 
to
 
how
 
you
 
would
 
plan
 
to
 
use
 
the
 
stories.
 
Figure
 
out
 
whether
 
the
 
stories
 
will
 
appear
 
in
 
your
 
magazine,
 
your
 
intranet
 
site,
 
your
 
internet
 
site,
 
your
 
management
 
meeting,
 
etc.
 
This
 
will
 
guide
 
how
 
you
 
develop
 
the
 
rules
 
and
 
timeline.
 
4.
 
Establish
 
a
 
budget.
 
Remember
 
to
 
include
 
the
 
cost
 
of 
 
prizes,
 
translations,
 
marketing,
 
and
 
time
 
required.
 
5.
 
Determine
 
in
 
how
 
many
 
languages
 
you’ll
 
run
 
the
 
contest.
 
For
 
multinational
 
organizations
 
or
 
those
 
with
 
a
 
diverse
 
workforce,
 
you
 
may
 
want
 
to
 
do
 
the
 
contest
 
in
 
more
 
than
 
one
 
language.
 
6.
 
Establish
 
a
 
timeline.
 
How
 
long
 
will
 
your
 
contest
 
run?
 
Be
 
sure
 
to
 
build
 
in
 
time
 
to
 
handle
 
translations,
 
market
 
the
 
contest,
 
review
 
the
 
entries,
 
and
 
select
 
a
 
winner.
 
Work
 
backwards
 
from
 
your
 
deadline.
 
7.
 
Build
 
out
 
a
 
project
 
plan.
 
With
 
your
 
timeline
 
in
 
place,
 
develop
 
a
 
project
 
plan
 
specifying
 
what
 
you
 
need
 
to
 
accomplish
 
and
 
by
 
when.
 
8.
 
Determine
 
the
 
prize(s)
 
you’ll
 
use
 
to
 
incentivize
 
people
 
to
 
participate.
 
Make
 
sure
 
that
 
they
 
are
 
appropriate
 
for
 
your
 
organization,
 
audience,
 
and
 
budget.
 
Consider
 
tax
 
implications
 
for
 
the
 
winners;
 
consult
 
your
 
finance
 
department.
 
9.
 
Draw
 
up
 
the
 
rules.
 
Work
 
with
 
your
 
legal
 
department
 
to
 
establish
 
the
 
rules
 
including
 
those
 
governing
 
the
 
prizes.
 
Do
 
you
 
have
 
rights
 
to
 
publish
 
the
 
works
 
in
 
perpetuity?
 
Only
 
for
 
internal
 
use?
 
For
 
internal
 
 
©2007,
 
Terrence
 
Gargiulo
 
&
 
MAKINGSTORIES.net
 
 –
 
terrence@makingstories.net
 
,
 
415
948
8087
 
and
 
external
 
use?
 
Figure
 
out
 
how
 
you
 
will
 
 judge
 
entries
 
in
 
advance
 
 –
 
you’ll
 
need
 
to
 
communicate
 
this
 
to
 
participants.
 
10.
 
Develop
 
the
 
marketing
 
plan.
 
Determine
 
how
 
extensive
 
a
 
plan
 
you’ll
 
need
 
given
 
your
 
audience.
 
Keep
 
in
 
mind
 
that
 
you’ll
 
need
 
periodic
 
reminders.
 
Incorporate
 
these
 
reminders
 
into
 
your
 
marketing
 
plan.
 
11.
 
Launch
 
the
 
contest.
 
12.
 
Monitor
 
the
 
contest.
 
Check
 
periodically
 
for
 
submissions.
 
Are
 
you
 
getting
 
the
 
numbers
 
anticipated?
 
You
 
may
 
need
 
to
 
increase
 
your
 
marketing
 
effort.
 
13.
 
Select
 
a
 
winner.
 
Once
 
you’ve
 
chosen
 
your
 
winners
 
and
 
any
 
runner
 
ups,
 
figure
 
out
 
how
 
you
 
will
 
notify
 
them.
 
We
 
recommend
 
that
 
you
 
notify
 
them
 
directly
 
in
 
advance
 
before
 
the
 
formal
 
announcement
 
of 
 
the
 
winners
 
is
 
made.
 
14.
 
Announce
 
the
 
winners.
 
Use
 
the
 
winning
 
entries
 
in
 
your
 
communications,
 
as
 
planned.
 
 
©2007,
 
Terrence
 
Gargiulo
 
&
 
MAKINGSTORIES.net
 
 –
 
terrence@makingstories.net
 
,
 
415
948
8087
 
Here
 
is
 
Case
 
Study
 
from
 
Sodexho
 
to
 
give
 
you
 
some
 
ideas
 
on
 
how
 
we
 
executed
 
one
 
of 
 
our
 
Story
 
Contests:
 
One
 
of 
 
the
 
most
 
gratifying
 
aspects
 
of 
 
my
 
work
 
with
 
organizations
 
is
 
helping
 
them
 
to
 
find
 
their
 
magic.
 
It’s
 
amazing
 
to
 
see
 
how
 
the
 
pervasive
 
grind
 
of 
 
employee’s
 
day
 
to
 
day
 
roles
 
and
 
responsibilities
 
erodes
 
people’s
 
appreciation
 
of 
 
what
 
makes
 
their
 
organization
 
special.
 
The
 
simple
 
act
 
of 
 
making
 
time
 
for
 
people
 
to
 
share
 
their
 
organizational
 
stories
 
and
 
encouraging
 
them
 
to
 
listen
 
actively
 
yields
 
tremendous
 
results
 
in
 
people’s
 
level
 
of 
 
engagement
 
and
 
excitement.
 
As
 
the
 
stories
 
unfold
 
a
 
tapestry
 
of 
 
key
 
stories
 
emerges.
 
These
 
stories
 
define
 
the
 
company’s
 
strengths
 
and
 
become
 
central
 
beacons
 
of 
 
purpose
 
and
 
volition
 
for
 
people.
 
There
 
are
 
additional
 
benefits
 
of 
 
informal
 
learning.
 
As
 
the
 
stories
 
spread
 
through
 
the
 
organization
 
they
 
produce
 
new
 
networks
 
of 
 
learning
 
and
 
information
 
exchange
 
that
 
might
 
otherwise
 
remain
 
dormant
 
or
 
never
 
discovered.
 
A
 
good
 
way
 
of 
 
 jumpstarting
 
the
 
process
 
is
 
to
 
have
 
employees
 
bring
 
customer
 
stories
 
inside.
 
Starbucks
 
Coffee
 
begins
 
almost
 
every
 
internal
 
meeting
 
with
 
a
 
customer
 
story
so
 
simple,
 
yet
 
so
 
powerful.
 
Once
 
a
 
climate
 
of 
 
story
 
sharing
 
exists,
 
and
 
people
 
are
 
listening
 
actively
 
to
 
one
 
another
 
it
 
becomes
 
more
 
possible
 
to
 
negotiate
 
differences
 
and
 
leverage
 
the
 
diversity
 
of 
 
perspective,
 
talents,
 
and
 
organizational
 
strengths
 
for
 
future
 
success.
 
Below
 
is
 
a
 
case
 
study
 
discussing
 
how
 
Sodexho
 
USA
 
has
 
begun
 
to
 
introduce
 
stories
 
into
 
their
 
management
 
practices.
 
SODEXHO
 
&
 
STORIES
 
The
 
 following
 
section
 
was
 
written
 
by 
 
 Angelo
 
Ioffreda,
 
Vice
President 
 
of 
 
Internal 
 
Communications
 
at 
 
Sodexho
 
USA.
 
Background:
 
Sodexho
 
is
 
the
 
leading
 
provider
 
of 
 
food
 
and
 
facilities
 
management
 
in
 
the
 
United
 
States
 
and
 
offers
 
innovative
 
outsourcing
 
solutions
 
in
 
food
 
service,
 
housekeeping,
 
grounds
 
keeping,
 
plant
 
operations
 
and
 
maintenance,
 
asset
 
management,
 
and
 
laundry
 
services
 
to
 
more
 
than
 
6,000
 
corporations,
 
health
 
care,
 
long
 
term
 
care
 
and
 
retirement
 
centers,
 
schools,
 
college
 
campuses,
 
military
 
and
 
remote
 
sites
 
in
 
North
 
America.
 
Sodexho
 
is
 
integrating
 
storytelling
 
into
 
its
 
workplace
 
with
 
several
 
objectives
 
in
 
mind:
 
1.)
 
to
 
obtain
 
feedback
 
from
 
employees,
 
insight
 
into
 
the
 
company’s
 
culture,
 
and
 
to
 
help
 
hone
 
our
 
brand
 
and
 
employee
 
value
 
proposition,
 
and
 
2.)
 
to
 
share
 
the
 
positive
 
experiences
 
of 
 
working
 
at
 
Sodexho
 
in
 
order
 
to
 
raise
 
morale
 
and
 
company
 
pride.
 
As
 
part
 
of 
 
our
 
management
 
and
 
communication
 
strategies
 
of 
 
stories,
 
Sodexho
 
launched
 
an
 
essay
 
contest
 
in
 
July
 
2004.
 
We
 
sent
 
out
 
a
 
flyer
 
in
 
English
 
and
 
Spanish
 
that
 
was
 
e
mailed
 
to
 
all
 
of 
 
our
 
managers.
 
The
 
topic
 
of 
 
the
 
essay
 
contest
 
was,
 
“What
 
I
 
Like
 
Most
 
About
 
My
 
Job.”
 
Stories
 
were
 
accepted
 
in
 
English,
 
Spanish,
 
and
 
French
 
and
 
we
 
profiled
 
the
 
winners
 
in
 
the
 
company
 
magazine,
 
Solutions
.
 

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