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Psalm 149 Commentary

Psalm 149 Commentary

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Published by glennpease
This next to the last Psalm combines the reality of worship and warfare as a part of the life of believers.
This next to the last Psalm combines the reality of worship and warfare as a part of the life of believers.

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Published by: glennpease on Nov 17, 2010
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01/10/2013

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PSALM 149 COMMETARY
Written and edited by Glenn Pease
PREFACE
My goal has been to collect the comments of those who add to our understanding of the Psalms.These comments are available to everyone, but I have brought them together in one place to savethe Bible student time in research. There is a great deal more, but this gives a good foundation tobuild on. If I quote anyone who does not wish to be quoted in this study they can let me know andI will remove their wisdom. My e-mail is glenn_p86@yahoo.com
ITRODUCTIO
1. Spurgeon, “The whole Book of Psalms is full of praise, but the praise culminates at the close.There are five “Hallelujah Psalms” at the end of the Book. They are so named because they bothbegin and conclude with the word,
 Hallelujah
, “Praise you the Lord.” It must be to the intenseregret of all reverent persons to find the word, Hallelujah, so used today in such a way that it ismade to be a commonplace instead of a very sacred word—Hallelujah, or, Praise be unto Jah,Jehovah! He who uses this word in a flippant manner is guilty of taking the name of the Lord invain!The book of Psalms ends in a sacred tumult of joyous praise. There is praise all through it,though sometimes it is but a still small voice. But when you reach the concluding Psalms you hearthunders of praise! There God is praised with the sound of the trumpet and upon the highsounding cymbals. All the force and the energy of sacred minstrelsy are laid under contributionthat Jehovah may be extolled. Let the Book of Psalms stand as an image of the Christian’s life. If we began with the blessing of the man who delights in the Law of the Lord. If we proceeded toobtain the blessing of the man whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered. If our soullearned to pant for her God as the hart for the water brooks. And if we went onwards till wesang, “He crowns me with loving kindness and tender mercies,” let us not pause now, butadvance to the hallelujahs of the closing pages of our book of life! He who ends this life withpraising God will begin the next life with the same delightful employment! As our latter days arenearer the land of Light, let them be fuller of song. Let us begin below the music which shall beprolonged through eternity.”2. Treasury of David, “We are almost at the last Psalm, and still among the Hallelujahs. This is "anew song", evidently intended for the new creation, and the men who are of new heart. It is sucha song as may be sung at the coming of the Lord, when the new dispensation shall bringoverthrow to the wicked and honor to all the saints. The tone is exceedingly jubilant and exultant.All through one hears the beat of the feet of dancing maidens, keeping time to the timbrel and
 
harp.”3. Calvin, “If we may be allowed to compare this Psalm with the former ones, and the next, whichis the last, the only difference is, that while the author of the Psalm, whoever he was, has hithertospoken of God’s special care and protection of his Church in connection with the commonprovidential government of the world, here he speaks of his benefits to the Church exclusively. Inthe next Psalm mention is only made of the power of God in general.”
1 Praise the LORD. Sing to the LORD a new song,his praise in the assembly of his faithful people.
1. Barnes, “Sing unto the Lord a new song - As if there was a new and a special occasion forpraise. This would be so if the psalm was composed on the return from the exile; on therebuilding of the city; and on the re-dedication of the temple.”1B. Ronnie Mceill, “Praise is a verb that shows action for or to something or someone. Praisecan come in many forms. A handshake is a way of praise for showing approval, a simple gestureis a form of praise for showing that you in agreement with or are giving accolades. The waving of a hand or screaming to the top of your voice at a football or baseball game when someone scoresa touch down to makes a run is another way of showing praise. What is praise? According to theLayman’s Bible Encyclopedia, praise is honor rendered for worth; approval; laudation; joyfultribute or homage rendered to God. The original Hebrew words for praise are halal and yadah.Halal means to show, to boast, or to celebrate and to glory in. It is the source of Hallelujah, whichis a Hebrew expression of praise, which is found more than 160 times in the Old Testament.Yadah, which means to give thanks and praise. It is a verb that is important to the language of worship and it’s found 120 times in the Old Testament.”1C. A new song is called for anytime there is a good reason for a fresh expression of praise andgratitude for God's amazing grace. “Psalm 96:1 "Oh sing to the Lord a new song! Sing to theLord, all the earth, sing to the Lord, bless His name; proclaim the good news of His salvationfrom day to day. Declare His glory among the nations, his wonders among the people." Psalm98:1 "Oh, sing to the Lord a new song! For he has done marvellous things; his right arm and hisholy arm have gained the victory. The lord has made known his salvation; his righteousness herevealed in the sight of the nations."Rev 5:9 "And they sang a new song" Rev 14:3 "they sang asit were a new song before the throne"2. Gill, “sing unto the Lord a new song; for a new mercy received, a new victory obtained, or anew salvation wrought; more particularly the new song of redeeming grace through Jesus Christ,the song of the Lamb, in distinction from the old song of Moses and the children of Israel at theRed sea, on account of their deliverance, which was typical of salvation by Christ, the oldest,being the first song we read of; but this is a new one, which none but the redeemed of the Lambcan sing; a song suited to Gospel times, in which all things are new, a new church state, new
 
ordinances, a new covenant, and a new and living way to the holiest of all; a song proper forrenewed persons to sing, who have new favours continually to bless and praise the Lord for;
and 
his praise in the congregation of saints: such who are partakers of the blessings of divinegoodness; are separated and distinguished from others by the grace of God; are sanctified andbrought into a Gospel church state; and who gather and assemble together to worship God, andattend upon him in his word and ordinances, and in such assemblies the praises of God are to besung; which being done socially, the saints are assisting to one another in this service; and it isdone with greater solemnity, and is more to the public honour and glory of God; thus Gospelchurches are called upon to sing the praises of God among themselves, Eph_5:19; and haveChrist for an example going before them, Psa_22:22.3. Henry, “The calls given to God's Israel to praise.
 All his works
were, in the foregoing psalm,excited to
 praise him;
but here his saints in a particular manner are required to bless him4. Spurgeon, “You have had new mercies from the Lord—give Him, in return, a new song! Youhave a new apprehension of His mercy. You who live under this Gospel dispensation havesomething more to sing of than even David experienced! Therefore, “sing unto Jehovah a newsong”—throw your hearts into it! Do not let it be a matter of routine, but let your whole soul, inall its vigor and freshness, address itself to the praise of God!”5. Warren Wiersbe, “The psalmist isn't telling us to buy a new hymnbook. He means we shouldhave a new experience with the Lord so that we will have a new song of praise to give to Him.Every new valley that we go through, every new mountaintop we climb, every experience of lifeought to be writing on our hearts a new song of praise. When we face a difficulty, we have anopportunity to have renewed faith and see God do new things.In verse 1 the psalmist tells us to sing in the congregation. I can understand that command. Ienjoy congregational singing when people sing to the Lord. "Let Israel rejoice in their Maker; letthe children of Zion be joyful in their King" (v. 2). I am glad when God's people gather in acongregation of celebration, rejoicing in the goodness and the glory of the Lord.But he also tells us we should be joyful on our beds. "Let them sing aloud on their beds" (v. 5).This could be while we're resting or recuperating from an illness. Perhaps you're lying in bedright now, and you don't feel well. Sing praises to the Lord upon your bed and worship Him.Then the psalmist says, "Let the high praises of God be in their mouth, and a two-edged sword intheir hand, to execute vengeance on the nations" (vv. 6,7). This is a picture of warriors on thebattlefield, singing in the midst of the battle.It is easy to sing in the congregation, not quite so easy to sing on our beds and difficult to sing onthe battlefield. But if we sing, we'll glorify the Lord, and we'll grow. "He will beautify the humblewith salvation" (v. 4). We'll be happier and holier and more beautiful if we sing to the Lord.God brings you through different experiences so you may learn new dimensions of His love andgrace. What difficulty are you facing today? Don't simply endure or waste it. Use it as anopportunity to find a new song of praise to God.”6. Calvin, “This exordium proves what I have just said, that the exhortation now given isaddressed only to God’s people; for the singular goodness which is particularly extended to themaffords more ample matter of praise. The probable conjecture is, that the Psalm was composed atthe time when the people were begun to rejoice, or after they had returned to their native country

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