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ABCD Guide to Creating a Neighborhood Learning Exchange

ABCD Guide to Creating a Neighborhood Learning Exchange

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Published by Marco Ramirez
This book presents a simple, inexpensive method for discovering untapped local resources that can be shared among community members. It shows how to design and operate a capacity-listing-and-referral service utilizing volunteers, donated space and a minimal budget. This model can be modified and expanded for larger groups with greater resources.

More at: http://www.abcdinstitute.org/publications/workbooks/
This book presents a simple, inexpensive method for discovering untapped local resources that can be shared among community members. It shows how to design and operate a capacity-listing-and-referral service utilizing volunteers, donated space and a minimal budget. This model can be modified and expanded for larger groups with greater resources.

More at: http://www.abcdinstitute.org/publications/workbooks/

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Published by: Marco Ramirez on Nov 18, 2010
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A GUIDE TO CREATING ANEIGHBORHOOD INFORMATION EXCHANGE:
BUILDING COMMUNITIES BY CONNECTINGLOCAL SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
A Community Building Workbook fromThe Asset-Based Community Development Institute Northwestern UniversityEvanston, IllinoisDeborah Puntenney, Research AssociateJohn P. Kretzmann and John L. McKnight, Co-directors© 1998 by John P. Kretzmann and John L. McKnight
 
Table of Contents i
A Community Building Workbook ©1998 Kretzmann & McKnight
 
Chapter One - INTRODUCTION 
1
 
Chapter Two - INITIAL STEPS 
5
 
Identifying a Core Group of Volunteers 5Designing Your Game Plan 5Choosing a Name for Your Organization 7Base of Operation 7Telephone Installation 8Conclusion
 
8
Chapter Three - INFORMATION SYSTEMS 
9
 
Completing a Master Card 9Completing a Teacher Match Card 12Completing a Learner Match Card 13Completing an Interest Match Card 15Completing the Feedback Cards 16Going Through the Process 20Conclusion
 
23
Chapter Four - PUBLICITY NETWORKS 
24General Considerations
 
24
 
Local Library 25Colleges and Universities
 
25
 
Park Districts and Recreation Centers 26Public Schools 27Local Churches
 
28Small Businesses
 
29
 
Word-of-Mouth Advertising 30Other Possibilities for Your Publicity Network 30Conclusion
 
30
Chapter Five - FUNDRAISING 
31
 
Internal Fundraising 31Motivating New Callers to Become Members 33General Fundraising Considerations for Expansion 34
Chapter Six - PROGRAM MANAGEMENT 
36
 
Administration of Your Program 36Conclusion
 
38
 Appendix A - Additional Information
39
 Appendix B - Frequently Asked Questions
41
 Appendix C - Capacity Listing Examples
43
 
Chapter One Introduction 1
A Community Building Workbook ©1998 Kretzmann & McKnight
 
CHAPTER ONEINTRODUCTION
This guide shares a process that was developed by one community organization as it discoveredhow to tap some of the unused and underutilized resources existing in its community. It explainsa simple, inexpensive way for other community groups to make the same discovery, and to makethese untapped local resources available to all members of the community. The originalorganization, founded in 1971, was called The Learning Exchange (TLE). TLE provided both amechanism for the exchange of skills among individuals living in metropolitan Chicago andeducational materials for other groups interested in the same sort of community venture. TheLearning Exchange was an independent, not-for-profit, educational and recreational listing andreferral service available to institutions, organizations, and people of all ages, races, socio-economic levels, and educational backgrounds. It was designed to facilitate an individualcapacity exchange so that knowledge and new ideas could be shared among communitymembers.With this revised guide, we carry on the tradition of TLE to periodically update informationabout how to organize such a capacity-sharing project. Although The Learning Exchangeorganization no longer exists, the ideas that formed the basis for its design are as worthwhiletoday as they were 25 years ago. There is one major difference, however, between the model provided by the original Learning Exchange and the model we will present here.The Learning Exchange was a formal, not-for-profit organization that was formed for thespecific purpose of managing a listing and referral service for the residents of a largemetropolitan area. TLE had employees, offices, telephone systems, and computer systems; inother words, more resources than many small community groups can manage without a greatdeal of outside assistance. However, the basic Learning Exchange model can be modified to suitthe financial and human resources of any community group, no matter how large or small. Thisguide presents a simple set of steps that describe how a small organization can develop asimplified and less formal version of a capacity listing and referral service using volunteers,donated space, and a minimal budget. Groups with extensive resources can easily translate thissimple model into a more complex version by expanding or increasing the sophistication of anyor all parts of the project.In the Appendices of this guide, we have made some notes about the kinds of issues you willencounter if you want to operate a larger and more formal version than we outline here.Throughout this guide, watch for the symbol ** to indicate that additional information isavailable in the Appendices.Following a brief history and description of the original organization, the basic steps for designing and operating a local capacity listing and referral service are presented in theremainder of this guide. We have included examples of how many of the steps may be

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