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Voyagers 1 and 2 Backgrounder Press Kit

Voyagers 1 and 2 Backgrounder Press Kit

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Published by Bob Andrepont
NASA press information for Voyager program
NASA press information for Voyager program

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Published by: Bob Andrepont on Nov 19, 2010
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10/17/2013

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Nh~tNews
National
Aeronautics
andSpace
Administration
Washington.
D
C
20546
AC
202
755-8370
For
Release
THURSDAY
February
22,
1979
Press
Kit
Project
VOYAGERS
1
and
2
BACKGROUNDER
RELEASE
NO:
79-22
-____
V-
 
RELEASE
NO:
79-22
-CONTENTS
2LHE
VOYAGER
SPACECRAFT...............................
1-22
Structure
and
Configuration.......................
2
Communications.....................................
8
Power..............................................
13
Attitude
Control
and
Propulsion...................
16
Temperature
Control................................
21
JUPITER..............................................
23-30
SATURN...............................................
31-36PLANETARYATMOSPHERIC
AND
SURFACE
DATA..............
37-38
COMPARISON
(Chart)...................................
39
THE
SATELLITES
OF
JUPITER
(Chart)...................
40
THE
SATELLITES
OF
SATURN
(Chart)....................
41
VOYAGER
SCIENCE......................................43-60
Voyager
Science
Investigations....................
44
Cosmic
Ray Investigation..........................
46
Low-EnergyCharged-ParticleInvestigation
.........
46
Magnetic
Fields
Inves~tigation.....................
47
Infrared
Spectroscopy
and
Radiometry
Investigation.....................................
48
IRIS
Instruments
...............................
49
PhotopolarimetryInvestiation....................
50
Planetary
Radio
AstronomyInvestigation
..........
50
Plasma
Investigation...............................
51
PlasmaWave
Investigation.........................
53
Radio
Science
Investigation.......................
54ImagingScience
Investigation.....................
54
UltravioletSpectroscopy
Investigation............
57
TRACKING
AND
DATA
ACQUISITION.......................
61-63MISSIONCONTROL
AND
COMPUTINGCENTER
...............64-65
VOYAGER
TEAM......................................
66-69
VOYAGER
SUBCONTRACTORS...............................
69-71CONVERSION
TABLE.....................................
72
Fl
n ,
 
THE
VOYAGERSPACECRAFT
The
two
Voyagerspacecraft
are
designed
to
operate
at
istances
from
Earth
andtheSun
greater
than
those
of
any
revious
NASA
mission.
Communications
capability,
hardware
eliability,
navigation
and
temperature
controlwereamong
he
major
challenges.The
spacecraft
are
identical.
Eachan
meet
the
objectives
of
either
mission
and
their
various
ptions.
EachVoyager
at
launchconsisted
of
a
missionmodule
--
he
planetaryvehicle
--
and
a
propulsion
module,
which
pro-
ided
the
final
energyincrement
necessary
to
inject
the
mis-
ion
module
into
the
Jupiter
transfer
trajectory.The
propul-
ion
module
was
jettisoned
after
the
required
velocity
wasttained.
(For
purposes
of
mission
description,
"spacecraft"
and
"mission
module"
will
beused
interchangeably.
In
des-
*
cribing
the
prelaunchconfiguration
and
launch
phase,
"space-raft"
willrefer
to
the
combined
"mission
module"
and"pro-
ulsion
module.")
The
missionmodule
afterinjectionweighed
826
kilograms
(1,820
pounds),
including
a
105-kg
(231-lb.)
science
instru-
ent
payload.
The
propulsion
module,
with
its
large
solid
ropellantrocket
motor,
weighed
1,220
kg(2,690
lb.).
The
pacecraft
adaptor
joins
the
spacecraft
with
the
Centaur
stagefthe
launch
vehicle.
It
weighed
47.2kg
(104
lb.).
Total
aunch
weight
of
the
spacecraft
was2,100
kg
(4,630
lb.).
To
assure
properoperation
forthe
four-year
flight
to
aturn,
and
perhaps
well
beyond,
mission
modulesubsystems
wereesignedwithhigh
reliability
and
extensive
redundancy.
Like
the
Mariners
that
explored
the
solar
system's
inner
lanets
andthe
Viking
Mars
Orbiters,
the
Voyagers
are
stabilized
n
threeaxes
using
the
Sunand
a
star
(Canopus)
as
celestial
eference
points.
Three
engineering
subsystems
are
proglammable
for
onboard
ontrol
of
spacecraft:
functions.
(Only
trajectorycorrection
aneuvers
must
be
enabled
by
ground
command.)
These
subsystems
re
the
computercommand
subsystems
(CCS),
the
flight
data
sub-
ystems
(FDS)
and
the
attitude
and
articulation
control
sub-
ystem
(AACS).
-more-

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