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KS2: Who has come to Britain, and when? Developing questioning through timeline maps

KS2: Who has come to Britain, and when? Developing questioning through timeline maps

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Published by Ireland in Schools
This overview of migration to Britain in intended for uses in primary schools in England. It uses visual sources to ask three questions: 1. Where are you from? 2. Who has come to Britain, and when? 3. Did the Irish come only at the time of the Famine? The images used are also available at: http://iisresource.org/Documents/Who_has_come_Britain_03.ppt
This overview of migration to Britain in intended for uses in primary schools in England. It uses visual sources to ask three questions: 1. Where are you from? 2. Who has come to Britain, and when? 3. Did the Irish come only at the time of the Famine? The images used are also available at: http://iisresource.org/Documents/Who_has_come_Britain_03.ppt

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Published by: Ireland in Schools on Aug 01, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/14/2011

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Ireland in Schools DRAFT, 15 July 2008
Key Stage 2 HistoryOverview lesson
Who has come to Britain, and when?
Developing questioning through timeline maps
An overview of migration to Britain in one lesson
http://iisresource.org/Documents/KS2_Who Has_Come_Britain.pd
Larger images of the sources are available as a PowerPoint at:
http://iisresource.org/Documents/Who_has_come_Britain_03.ppt University of Birmingham BASS University of Northampton
Contents
 About this lessonLesson planQuestion 1 Where are you from?Question 2. Who came to Britain & when?Timeline map of movement to, & settlement in, BritainCards 1-16Picture cards A-OKey for matching statements & picturesQuestion 3 How accurate are the statements about when people came to Britain?Timeline map of Irish movement to, & settlement in, BritainEvidence about the Irish in BritainSome reasons for emigrating  AfL DiaryOutline maps of Britain & the world, & concentric ‘circles’The populations of England, Scotland, Wales & Great Britain, by ethnic group, 2001
 
Who has come to Britain, & when?, 2
 About this lesson
This lesson is intended to give an overview of the movement to, and settlement in,Britain by people from various parts of the world since the Romans.The key question asks who has come to Britain, and when?The lessona. enables students to begin to question some generally accepted views aboutmigration,b. provides an introduction to depth studies of immigration and settlement, suchas ‘What was it like to be an Irish immigrant in Britain in the 19th century?’ byIreland in Schools athttp://iisresource.org/migration.aspxc. encourages students to
use the language of movement and settlementuse geographical and historical questioningexplore personal, family and community identity.understand that people have come to Britain over a long periodplace these people in time and spaceuse conventional language on the passage of timechallenge populist perceptions & stereotypesrecognise similarities & differences in human activity and motivation over timeunderstand the diverse experiences of men, women & children in past societies.
The lesson alsoa. offers scope for work in Geography and PSHE/Citizenship;b. fully embraces the Every Child Matters strategy - see last page.
Prior knowledge
Children could know something aboutoneormoregroupsofpeoplewhohavemoved to and settled in Britain, eg.Romans, Saxons or Vikings.It is possible to use this exercise as anintroduction where pupils have limitedknowledge of any migrant groups as alead into a depth study of one or twogroups.
Links to Key Stage 2 National Curriculum
History
1a. Place events, people and changes into correct periods of time.2a. Know about characteristic features of the periods andsocieties studied, including the ideas, beliefs, attitudes andexperiences of men women and children in the past.2d. Be able to describe and make links between the main events,situations and changes within and across the different periodsand societies studied.2c. To identify and describe reasons for, and results of, historicalevents, situations and changes in the periods studied.4a .Be able to fond out about events, people and changes studiedfrom an appropriate range if sources.4b. Be able The lesson also offers scope for linked learning withGeography and PSHE/Citizenship. to ask and answerquestions and to select and record information relevant to thefocus of the enquiry5c. Be able to communicate their knowledge and understandingof history.
Breadth of study
This lesson contributes to:Victorian Britain: A study of the impact of significant individuals,events and changes in work and transport on the lives of men,women and children from different sections of society.It can be linked to migration during other areas of study such e.g.,Romans, Saxons, Vikings in Britain; Black African and Huguenotmigration in Britain and the wider world in Tudor Times. .
PSHE/Citizenship
2i. To appreciate the range of national, regional, religious andethnic identities in the United Kingdom.4d To realise the nature and consequences of racism, teasing,bullying and aggressive behaviours and how to respond tothem and ask for help.4f. To understand that differences and similarities betweenpeople arise from a number of factors, including cultural,ethnic, racial and religious diversity, gender and disability.5g. To consider social and moral dilemmas that they comeacross in life (fur example. Encouraging respect andunderstanding between different races and dealing withharassment)
Geography
2c. To use atlases and globes, and maps and plans at a range of scales.4b. To recognise some physical and human processes andexplain how these can cause changes in place andenvironments.
English 1 Speaking and Listening 
3b. Group discussion and interaction: To be able to varycontributions to suit the activity and purpose, includingexploratory and tentative comments where ideas are beingcollected together, and reasoned, evaluative comments asdiscussion moves to conclusions or actions.3c. Group discussion and interaction: To qualify or justify whatthey think after listening to others' questions or accounts.
 Lesson plan on following page.
 
Who has come to Britain, & when?, 3
Lesson plan
Key questions Activity NC links
1. StarterWhere are youfrom?
10 mins
Using 3 maps, one of the local area, one of the UK (p.16) and one of theworld (p. 7),
1
in pairs discuss and mark on each of the maps thedifferent places you, your parents and grandparents have lived.
(Optional homework. Bring in pictures of family history for a wall display to go beside the timeline map used in activities 2 & 3 for Question 2.)
 History
1a, 2a, 5c
PSHE/ Citizenship
2i,4f 
Geography
2c,4b
 English
Eng1.3b2. Who has come toBritain, and when?
20 mins
1. As a class, match the descriptions of the settlers (cards 2.1-2.15 - p.5)with the images (cards 2.A-2.O - pp 6-8).2. Divide into four groups, with five of six cards (from across thetimeline. Put the cards in chronological order.3. Class activity. Using timeline map (p. 4), preferably on a wall, placethe cards on the appropriate place on the timeline and identify the placethey came from on the map.
(This timeline map will be used again in Questions 3.)
4. Record in AfL diary
2
a. what they have learnedb. what more they want to find out.
 History
1a, 2a,2c,2d,4a,5c
 PSHE/ Citizenship
2i,4f 
 English
Eng1. 3c
3. Did the Irish comeonly at the time of the Famine?
30 mins
Class activity1. Students use the information cards to answer the key question:a. i. what information is there to suggest when the Irish came
?
Usethe Irish timeline map provided (p.10).ii. place the Irish cards on the timeline map used for Question 2.b. what pieces of evidence make people think that they only came at thetime of the Famine?2. Why did they come?
Were they pushed by adverse conditions in Ireland?Were they pulled by the attractions of Britain? Are there any other reasons why they might have come to Britain?
Using the evidence so far, and armed with two different colouredpencils, students highlight the push and pull factors for specific groupof migrants, such as monks, Tudor people, etc.
(Optional extension. Use the pull-push grid (p. 4) to identify the Irish motivesof migration. Justify your choices on the evidence you looked at.
3
 )
3. As whole class share findings and put their conclusions on the maintimeline from Question 2 (p. 3).4. Review. Class considers the implications for the other groups on thetimeline. Complete AfL diary.
 History
2c,* 2d, *4a,4b, 5c,
PSHE/ Citizenship
2i ,4d, 4f, 5g
 English
Eng1.3b, 3c
1 Or use three concentric circles (p. 18).2 It is appreciated that some schools use AfL to measure what students have achieved against NC levels. The unit uses AfL to encourage students to reflect on their own learning without reference to levels.3 This grid can be used with any migrant group and for comparisons between groups, eg, the Irish & the AfricanCaribbeans.

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