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Up From Slavery by BT Washington

Up From Slavery by BT Washington

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Published by Michael D. Haus
Nineteenth-century African American businessman, activist, and educator Booker Taliaferro Washington's Up from Slavery is one of the greatest American autobiographies ever written. Its mantras of black economic empowerment, land ownership, and self-help inspired generations of black leaders, including Marcus Garvey, Elijah Muhammad, Malcolm X, and Louis Farrakhan. In rags-to-riches fashion, Washington recounts his ascendance from early life as a mulatto slave in Virginia to a 34-year term as president of the influential, agriculturally based Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. From that position, Washington reigned as the most important leader of his people, with slogans like "cast down your buckets," which emphasized vocational merit rather than the academic and political excellence championed by his contemporary rival W.E.B. Du Bois. Though many considered him too accommodating to segregationists, Washington, as he said in his historic "Atlanta Compromise" speech of 1895, believed that "political agitation alone would not save [the Negro]," and that "property, industry, skill, intelligence, and character" would prove necessary to black Americans' success. The potency of his philosophies are alive today in the nationalist and conservative camps that compose the complex quilt of black American society.
Nineteenth-century African American businessman, activist, and educator Booker Taliaferro Washington's Up from Slavery is one of the greatest American autobiographies ever written. Its mantras of black economic empowerment, land ownership, and self-help inspired generations of black leaders, including Marcus Garvey, Elijah Muhammad, Malcolm X, and Louis Farrakhan. In rags-to-riches fashion, Washington recounts his ascendance from early life as a mulatto slave in Virginia to a 34-year term as president of the influential, agriculturally based Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. From that position, Washington reigned as the most important leader of his people, with slogans like "cast down your buckets," which emphasized vocational merit rather than the academic and political excellence championed by his contemporary rival W.E.B. Du Bois. Though many considered him too accommodating to segregationists, Washington, as he said in his historic "Atlanta Compromise" speech of 1895, believed that "political agitation alone would not save [the Negro]," and that "property, industry, skill, intelligence, and character" would prove necessary to black Americans' success. The potency of his philosophies are alive today in the nationalist and conservative camps that compose the complex quilt of black American society.

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Published by: Michael D. Haus on Nov 25, 2010
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07/30/2013

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 1
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography
By Booker T. Washington 
 
Up From Slavery2
Layout and Cover Copyright ©2010All Rights ReservedPrinted in the USAPublished by ReadaClassic.comISBN:
1611041260
 
 
Preface3
Table of Contents
Preface ..........................................................................................................4Introduction ...................................................................................................5Chapter 1: A Slave Among Slaves ................................................................... 14Chapter 2: Boyhood Days .............................................................................. 30Chapter 3: The Struggle For An Education ...................................................... 43Chapter 4: Helping Others ............................................................................. 58Chapter 5: The Reconstruction Period............................................................ 70Chapter 6: Black Race and Red Race .............................................................. 79Chapter 7: Early Days at Tuskegee ................................................................. 89Chapter 8: Teaching School in a Stable and a Hen-House ................................ 98Chapter 9: Anxious Days and Sleepless Nights .............................................. 109Chapter 10: A Harder Task than Making Bricks ............................................. 120Chapter 11: Making Their Beds Before They Could Sleep............................... 131Chapter 13: Raising Money.......................................................................... 141Chapter 13: Two Thousand Miles for a Speech ............................................. 155Chapter 14: The Atlanta Exposition Address ................................................. 170Chapter 15: The Secret of Success in Public Speaking .................................... 186Chapter 16: Europe..................................................................................... 208Chapter 17: Last Words............................................................................... 227

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