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John Zerzan the Nihilist's dictionary

John Zerzan the Nihilist's dictionary

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Published by Adi Petre

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Published by: Adi Petre on Nov 28, 2010
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06/30/2012

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John Zerzan
e Nihilist’s Dictionary
1994T A L
 
Contents
Tenology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3Niceism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5Feral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7Division of Labor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8Progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
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Tenology
Te-nol-o-gy n. According to Webster’s: industrial or applied science. In reality: the en-semble of division of labor/production/industrialism and its impact on us and on nature.Tenology is the sum of mediations between us and the natural world and the sum of thoseseparations mediating us from ea other. it is all the drudgery and toxicity required to pro-duce and reproduce the stage of hyper-alienation we live in. It is the texture and the form of domination at any given stage of hierary and commodification.ose who still say that tenology is “neutral,” “merely a tool,” have not yet begun toconsider what is involved. Junger, Adorno and Horkheimer, Ellul and a few others over thepast decades — not to mention the crushing, all but unavoidable truth of tenology in itsglobalandpersonaltollhaveledtoadeeperapproatothetopic. irty-fiveyearsagotheesteemed philosopher Jaspers wrote that “Tenology is only a means, in itself neither goodnor evil. Everything depends upon what man makes of it, for what purpose it serves him,under what conditions he places it.” e araic sexism aside, su superficial faith in spe-cialization and tenical progress is increasingly seen as ludicrous. Infinitely more on targetwas Marcuse when he suggested in 1964 that “the very concept of tenical reason is perhapsideological. Not only the application of tenology, but tenology itself is domination…methodical, ascientific, calculated, calculating control.” Today we experience that control asa steady reduction of our contact with the living world, a speeded-up Information Age emp-tyness drained by computerization and poisoned by the dead, domesticating imperialism of high-te method. Never before have people been so infantalized, made so dependant on themaine for everything; as the earth rapidly approaes its extinction due to tenology, oursouls are shrunk and flaened by its pervasive rule. Any sense of wholeness and freedomcan only return by the undoing of the massive division of labour at the heart of tenologicalprogress. is is the liberatory project in all its depth.Of course, the popular literature does not yet reflect a critical awareness of what tenol-ogy is. Some works completely embrace the direction we are being taken, su as McCor-du’s ‘Maines Who ink’ and Simons’ ‘Are Computers Alive?’, to mention a couple of the more horrendous. Other, even more recent books seem to offer a judgement that finallyflies in the face of mass pro-te propaganda, but fail dismally as they rea their conclu-sions. Murphy, Miunas and Piloa edited ‘e Underside of High-Te: Tenology andthe Deformation of Human Sensibilities’ , who’s ferocious title is completely undercut by anending that tenology will become human as soon as we ange our assumptions about it!Very similar is Siegel and Markoff’s ‘e High Cost of High Te’; aer apters detailingthe various levels of tenological debilitation, we once again learn that its all just a questionof aitude: “We must, as a society, understand the full impact of high tenology if we areto shape it into a tool for enhancing human comfort, freedom and peace.is kind of cow-ardice and/or dishonesty owes only in part to the fact that major publishing corporations donot wish to publicize fundamentally radical ideas.e above-remarked flight into idealism is not a new tactic of avoidance. Martin Heideg-ger, considered by some the most original and deep thinker of this century, saw the individ-3

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