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30 Days to a Stronger Scene

30 Days to a Stronger Scene

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Published by Emmes Peeyem

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Published by: Emmes Peeyem on Nov 29, 2010
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11/29/2010

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30 Days to a Stronger SceneSCENE 1: What has the Most Potentialfor Improving Your Writing?
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 create,creative writing,how to,novel,scene,script,story,write  What has the most potential for improving your writing? Learning to write a strongscene; then making sure every scene in your story is strong. Because it¶s so important,we¶ll spend the next 30 days breaking down scenes and trying to write the strongest possible.
 
Join us on Facebook for a discussion of scenes.
What is a scene?
It is a self-contained unit of action within a story, novel, or script.The action has a beginning, middle and end; it consists of external actions, thought andemotions of characters. A character has an underlying goal or need and s/he tries toachieve that goal; complications and obstacles prevent the character from reaching thegoal and the scene ends in a disaster.
Why write in scenes?
Because it¶s easier to build tension, write tight and stay focused when writing in scenes.Using a scene means everything in that section of the story is focused on the character¶scurrent goal; all obstacles relate to that goal; the disaster increases tension and puts thecharacter in even hotter water. The result is that readers stay tuned.
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 Cd/pdf compilation of Darcy Pattison¶s most popular titles on writing and publishingfiction.
November discount: 10% off orders of $30 or more. Use discount code:scene.
 
How do I know if I write in scenes?
The Box Test.One test to see if you write in scenes is to literally mark one your manuscript, drawing a box around the scene. It may cover several pages, but you can boxit out. The scene structure may be loose and not fully developed, but within that box,there should be some sense of movement toward a goal.First what is a scene?Well, writers kinda stumble around on definitions like this. We sorta know what it iswhen we see it. But how do we put it into words?(An aside: I find it frustrating that we don¶t have the vocabulary to talk about our craft.Even for a basic thing like a scene, writers find it hard to put into words±irony intended± what we are doing. And when you get to something like voice, it¶s even harder. We needto work harder to find vocabulary for our craft.)
Scene Defined
A scene is a connected series of actions that lead up to something. Notice, is is actions.It¶s not just dialogue or narrative, but actions. Implied is a beginning, middle and an end.Certainly, the scene should make a difference in the story by changing something,introducing tension, developing relationships, etc.
What is a scene?
It is a self-contained unit of action within a story, novel, or script.The action has a beginning, middle and end; it consists of external actions, thought andemotions of characters. A character has an underlying goal or need and s/he tries toachieve that goal; complications and obstacles prevent the character from reaching thegoal and the scene ends in a disaster.
 
Why write in scenes?
Because it¶s easier to build tension, write tight and stay focused when writing in scenes.Using a scene means everything in that section of the story is focused on the character¶scurrent goal; all obstacles relate to that goal; the disaster increases tension and puts thecharacter in even hotter water. The result is that readers stay tuned.Ok. Take the Box Test.
The Scene Box Test
Pull out a chapter of your current WIP and draw boxes around the scenes.1. Does each scene have a series of actions?2, Is there a beginning, middle and end?3. Does the outcome of the scene make a difference in the story?4. Why did you choose THIS scene? At this point in the story, why did you slow downand zoom in on details to SHOW-DON¶T-TELL this particular section of the story?5. Is there an engine, a question, a pulse, a tension, an anticipation, a something that runsthrough the scene and makes you want to turn the page?I¶ll tell you what I found
.Unfocused scenes
.
Half scenes with either no beginning or no end
.
Too much narrative
. Hey, I¶m revising!
What did you find?
If you¶re used to writing scripts, scenes in a novel work a little bit different. For scripts,scenes are mandatory and a new scene starts any time the location changes: for example,if a character is outside a house and walks inside. Scenes in scripts tend to be short. For anovel, a scene can extend longer and cover several minor changes of setting. So, if you¶reused to writing scripts, instead think of 
scene sequences
, or a series of scenes that cover adistinct goal of a character.
Is writing in scenes easy to learn?
Yes. The basics are simple. The nuances are as easy and as hard as any other storywriting skills.
What will 30 Days to a Stronger Scene cover?

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