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Woodrow Wilson: Disciple of Revolution -- Jennings C. Wise (1938)

Woodrow Wilson: Disciple of Revolution -- Jennings C. Wise (1938)

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Published by TheLibertyChannel
«What then if Carnegie and his unlimited wealth, the international financiers, and the Socialists could be organized in a movement to compel the formation of a league to enforce peace? Surely it would not be difficult to bring about a union of these forces with the Pacifists, through the medium of a great humanist propaganda carried on with Carnegie's money, which would appeal to them all alike!» (page 63)

This book is a very interesting (albeit apologetic) account of the machinations of the banking establishment during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. For me, the most interesting part in it, is its detailed exploration of the Marburg Plan, drawn up by financiers Carnegie and Marburg in the US, and establishment people like William Stead, Cecil Rhodes and the Fabian Society, in the UK.
The objective of the Marburg plan of action was to create a coalition between the big international financiers and the socialist movement, under which these groups would share dominion over a *global society*: the bankers would control the global system by the issuance of currency, and by the general control over economic processes; while the socialists would run things on the political level. This, of course, is what came to fruition in the real world – and the process keeps unraveling, as the world becomes more and more "integrated", "socialized" and authoritarian, to lengths never before imagined, under the process of economic and political globalization that has, for decades, been imposed by the big banking houses and their many branches into society – including the socialist movement.

This book should be read in conjunction with Professor Carroll Quigley's “Tragedy and Hope” and “The Anglo-American Establishment” – great explorations on the whole topic of globalization, yet from another impeccably documented, although apologetic, source.
«What then if Carnegie and his unlimited wealth, the international financiers, and the Socialists could be organized in a movement to compel the formation of a league to enforce peace? Surely it would not be difficult to bring about a union of these forces with the Pacifists, through the medium of a great humanist propaganda carried on with Carnegie's money, which would appeal to them all alike!» (page 63)

This book is a very interesting (albeit apologetic) account of the machinations of the banking establishment during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. For me, the most interesting part in it, is its detailed exploration of the Marburg Plan, drawn up by financiers Carnegie and Marburg in the US, and establishment people like William Stead, Cecil Rhodes and the Fabian Society, in the UK.
The objective of the Marburg plan of action was to create a coalition between the big international financiers and the socialist movement, under which these groups would share dominion over a *global society*: the bankers would control the global system by the issuance of currency, and by the general control over economic processes; while the socialists would run things on the political level. This, of course, is what came to fruition in the real world – and the process keeps unraveling, as the world becomes more and more "integrated", "socialized" and authoritarian, to lengths never before imagined, under the process of economic and political globalization that has, for decades, been imposed by the big banking houses and their many branches into society – including the socialist movement.

This book should be read in conjunction with Professor Carroll Quigley's “Tragedy and Hope” and “The Anglo-American Establishment” – great explorations on the whole topic of globalization, yet from another impeccably documented, although apologetic, source.

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Published by: TheLibertyChannel on Nov 29, 2010
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02/07/2013

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WOODROW WILSON DISCIPLE OF REVOLUTION
BY JENNINGS C. WISEAuthor of "Empire and Armament," "The Long Arm of Lee,"
 
"The Call of the Republic," "The Great Crusade,"
 
"The Red Man In the New World Drama," etc.
 
TABLE OF CONTENTSPAGEPreface........................................................................................xixC
HAPTER
IWoodrow Wilson's Early Education and The Evolution of His Poltical Philosophy......................................................... 1C
HAPTER
IIWilson Studies Law. Hostile to the Southern PoliticalTradition. He Attempts Practice in Atlanta. EntersJohns Hopkins. Publishes Congressional Government. Enters the Faculty of Bryn Mawr. Goes toWesleyan. Deems Both Parties Moribund. PublishesThe State, and Division and Reunion. Denies Southern Origin, and Claims to be a Federalist. Seeksto Create a Third Party. The Rise of Anarchy andSocialism. Carnegie and Bryce Versus Proudhon andKropotkin. Populism. Bryanism. William of Hohen-zollern Succeeds to the Throne of Germany. Fall of Bismarck............................................................................... 19C
HAPTER
IIIBryan and Free Silver. Marburg at Oxford. The Rise of Japan. Wilson Takes Up Writing History for Political Purposes. His George Washington. Marburgand "The World's Money Problem." Bryan Defeated."Despairing Democracy." The Spanish-AmericanWar and American Imperialism............................................. 32C
HAPTER
IVThe War with Spain and the End of American Isolation. ImperialismRampant. Marburg Plans to Enforce Peace. The First Hague PeaceConference. The Boer War. "The United States of Europe"Proposed. Thev
 
PAGEPrinciple of International Cooperation Applied in China.Marburg's Theory of Expansion. Bryan as the "Apostle of Peace."Wilson Contemplates Attending Heidelberg with Marburg.Cleveland Conies to Princeton. Wilson Elected President of Princeton. 40C
HAPTER
VHarvey's Plan to Make Wilson President. Carnegie Donates the Peace Palace. The Lake Mohonk PeaceConference. The Principle of Arbitration Established.The South Hostile to Wilson. The Position of Japan.Harvey Proclaims Wilson as the Democratic Moses.The Conciliation Internationale and the American Association for International Conciliation. RooseveltSends the Fleet to the Orient. The Second HaguePeace Conference. The Central American Court of Justice. Wilson's Troubles at Princeton. Branded"Intellectually Dishonest" by Cleveland. His Dismissal Demanded. Homer Lea and the Yellow Peril.Fearful of War and Still Hoping for a Third Party,Wilson Hesitates to Commit Himself to the Democratic "Boss" of New Jersey. The American Societyfor Judicial Settlement of International Disputes. TaftAdvocates a World Court. Roosevelt and Knox Propose a League to Enforce Peace. Wilson ElectedGovernor................................................................................57C
HAPTER
VIThe Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Wilson Turns onthe New Jersey Bosses. Bryan Brands Wilson "an Autocrat."McCombs Becomes Wilson's Campaign Manager. Enter ColonelHouse, Exponent of Revolution. The Mexican Revolution. HouseMeets Wilson and Captivates Him. Enter also Houston. TheConversion of Wilson Begins. Harvey Dropped by Wilson.Watterson Infuriated, Sets the South Against Wilson. Morgenthau,Aspirant for Secretary of the Treasury, Becomes Chairman of Wilson's Finance Committee. McAdoo Joins Wilson. Mexico andthe Haldane Commission. Marburg Publishes[vi]

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