Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Land Report 100

Land Report 100

Ratings: (0)|Views: 3,406 |Likes:
Published by docdumpster

More info:

Published by: docdumpster on Dec 01, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/09/2012

pdf

text

original

 
2010 LAND REPORT 100
The
Land Report
LARGEST USA LANDOWNERS
FALL 2010
| TheLandReport
37
   T   O   P   R   O   W   :   W   Y   M   A   N   M   E   I   N   Z   E   R ,   K   A   T   H   Y   M   C   C   R   A   I   N   E ,   K   E   N   T   O   N   R   O   W   E   C   E   N   T   E   R   R   O   W   :   B   E   L   L   R   A   N   C   H ,   S   A   M   B   E   L   L   I   N   G ,   V   E   R   M   E   J   O   P   A   R   K   B   O   T   T   O   M   R   O   W   :   B   E   L   L   R   A   N   C   H ,   W   Y   A   T   T   M   C   S   P   A   D   D   E   N ,   B   E   L   L   R   A   N   C   H
LANDREPORT.COM
THE MAGAZINE OF THE AMERICAN LANDOWNER$15
 WWW.LANDREPORT.COM | FALL 2010
SPECIAL REPORT
LARGEST USA LANDOWNERS
PLUS:
LABRADOR RETRIEVERS | BP OIL SPILL | LAND REPORT TOP TEN
SALE OF THECENTURY:
JOHN MALONE BUYSNEW MEXICO’S290,100-ACREBELL RANCH
 
FALL 2010
| TheLandReport
39
LANDREPORT.COM
38
TheLandReport
|
FALL 2010
LANDREPORT.COM
T
his year marks the fourth time
The Land Report 
haspresented the top 100 landowners in the country. And italso marks the fourth time that Ted Turner has topped ourlist. In 2010, Turner added to his chart-topping 2 million-plus acresby acquiring Nonami Plantation near Albany, Georgia. The acquisi-tion is a notable one because Nonami ranks as the largest propertyfor the entrepreneur, environmentalist, philanthropist, and mediamogul in the state where he was raised.Nonami Plantation adds 8,800 acres to the 15 ranches Turnerowns in seven states, and it is considered one of the finest quailhunting venues in the Peach State. Turner purchased the plantationfrom a longtime business associate, Atlanta developer Tom Cousins,in a private transaction.“Tom and Ted have been good friends for many years,” saysTurner spokesman Phillip Evans. “From what I understand theymade a gentlemen’s agreement years ago. If Tom ever decided tosell, Ted would get first option to purchase the property. They bothappreciate what a special piece of land it is.”Much of the property is already under a conservation easement.“As with all of Turner’s land, Nonami will be managed in an envi-ronmentally and ecologically friendly manner,” Evans adds.Turner’s record as a landowner proves that he is nothing if notdedicated to running his holdings in a way that promotes the con-servation of both the land itself and native species. In particular,Turner is known for his conservation of buffalo.His 50,000+ is the world’s largest private herd. He recentlyoffered to shelter 87 bison from Yellowstone National Park forfive years as part of an experiment by the Montana Departmentof Fish, Wildlife and Parks to establish a free-roaming herd free of brucellosis and other diseases that can spread to cattle. After thefive years, the bison will be returned to the State of Montana, andTurner will keep a percentage of the herd’s offspring.Innovative solutions to ensure the continuation of endangeredspecies are but one facet of Turner’s stewardship philosophy.Another lies in clean, renewable energy. In January 2010, TurnerRenewable Energy partnered with Southern Company to developrenewable energy resources on his properties as well as off. Theirfirst project, New Mexico’s Cimarron Solar Facility, will be one of the nation’s largest photovoltaic plants, generating enough energy tosupply 9,000 homes with electricity. Cimarron, which is scheduledto begin commercial operation in late 2010, is located next toTurner’s Vermejo Park Ranch, the largest privately owned pon-derosa pine ecosystem in the nation.The Cimarron plant is yet another example of how Turner backsup his opinions with concrete action. He has been increasingly vocalabout his belief that the United States should move toward moresustainable forms of energy, and he has gone as far as to lobbyCongress on renewable energy and climate issues. It goes hand inhand with his desire to use his clout and his land to make the worlda better place for his—and our—children and grandchildren.
The
Land Report
100
T
he family business, Irving Woodlands, has been an integral part of forestry inMaine for more than 60 years and owns over 1.2 million acres certified by boththe Forest Stewardship Council and the Sustainable Forestry Initiative. Forestresearch and conservation are key elements of the company’s forestry activities. Notonly are 20 percent of its holdings dedicated to habitat conservation, but the Irvingsdonated $1 million to create a chair in forest sustainability research at the Universityof Maine. The company has earned the Gulf of Maine Visionary Award and has beenrecognized by the World Wildlife Fund, The Nature Conservancy, and the InteriorDepartment for research and conservation of the Northern Forest woodcock. IrvingWoodlands is also a leader in tree planting and reforestations.
No.1
234
Ted Turner
2+ million acresVISIONARY
The nation’slargestlandowneracquired oneof Georgia’sfinest quailplantationsin 2010.
Red Emmerson
1.722million acresTIMBER
T
he lumber industry’s sluggish yearmay have taken Emmerson downa few notches on
 Forbes
’s roster of billionaires, but he remains in the secondslot on
The Land Report 
’s list, right wherehe’s been all along. The third generationof Emmersons is now involved in runningthe family’s Sierra Pacific Industries: Red’slate father “Curly” founded the business in1949, Red serves as president, and his sonMark is VP of finance. Sierra Pacific ranksas California’s largest private landowner.Among its noteworthy achievements in2010 was placing 7,500 acres just north of Truckee under conservation easements,the first such action taken by the company.
Brad Kelley 
1.7 million acresCONSERVATION
L
ike many aself-madebillionaire,Brad Kelley shunspublicity. Shuns itso much, in fact,that he’s becomesomething of anenigma to manyof his neighbors,a presence madeeven larger by hisabsence. Kelley’senormous holdingsare spread acrossTexas, New Mexico,and Florida. Hisproperties are usedprimarily to propa-gate rare species of animals, includingendangered ones.He has used hisshrewd businessacumen to guidehis purchases,snapping up choicetracts with thenatural resourcesneeded to furtherhis considerableconservation efforts.
Irving Family 
1.2 million acresTIMBER
PHIL MCCARTEN/REUTERS
SHUTTERSTOCKSHUTTERSTOCKSHUTTERSTOCK
1234
 
40
TheLandReport
|
FALL 2010FALL 2010
| TheLandReport
41
LANDREPORT.COM
5
The
Land Report
100
JohnMalone
1.2 million acresMEDIA
T
he onlymajor move-ment in this year’s top ten isLiberty Media CEOJohn Malone, whosepurchase of the290,000-acre BellRanch this Augustleapfrogged himfrom No. 7 to No. 5,ahead of KingRanch and theSingleton Family.Thanks to hisconservation-mind-ed land ownership,Malone has earnedmany friends (bothtwo-legged andfour-legged) overthe years. In aninterview onBloomberg in July,Malone said that hisfriend Ted Turnerwas partly his inspi-ration. “It is sort of a lasting economicasset, and if you arecharitably mindedand you like conser- vation, you sort of can do well bydoing good,” he said.“I own a lot of land.In fact, Ted and Iare neighbors inNew Mexico.”
5
O
dds are you already know New Mexico’sBell Ranch. At 453 square miles, it’skind of hard to overlook. But to focuson size alone is to overlook a much richer story.The Bell has been featured in countlessWesterns and dramatically depicted on millionsof Stetson hatboxes. If you’re old enoughto remember when tobacco compa-nies could advertise, the ranch’smesas and pastures were the time-less backdrop in many a Marlboroprint campaign. Few venuesepitomize the American West likethe gorgeous grasslands, stunningmesas, and rugged rimrock canyonssurrounding the distinctive bell-shaped mountain a short ridenorth of the Canadian River.The Bell Ranch is a place of loreand legend whose contemporaryhistory dates back to an impossiblylarge land grant of some 656,000acres by the Mexican government toPablo Montoya in 1824. Only thehills know how long the Comanche,the Kiowa, and the Apache madecamp along the banks of La CintaCreek before the Spanish army offi-cer petitioned Mexico City for his lands.Almost two centuries have passed since DonPablo took title to more than 1,000 square milesof what eventually became the New MexicoTerritory. Its ideal setting—the ranch ranges inelevation from 4,200 to 5,600 feet above sealevel—is more reminiscent of the AfricanSerengeti than the Great Plains or the LlanoEstacado. Top-notch cowmen such as thepioneering trailblazer Charlie Goodnight havelong marveled at the ranch’s plentiful waters, itsprotein-rich grasses, and the temperate climate.The lure of this remote cattle kingdom is sostrong that the Bell has enticed five formidablemen to commit themselves to shepherding theranch since 1933: Albert Mitchell, George Ellis,Don Hofman, Rusty Tinnin, and Bert Ancell,the general manager, who had 41 years of experience on the Bell. Half a dozen handswith an average of 15 years service on the Bellworked with Ancell.This peerless legacy is one of the many price-less assets that make the Bell more than simplyanother big spread. Take, for instance, theranch’s horse breeding program, which canbe traced back to a remount herd used by theU.S. cavalry almost a century ago. The ranchhas also developed a closed composite breed of cattle. Known as RedBell, the breed consistsof carefully selected Red Angus and Herefordbloodlines, plus smaller percentages of Brahmaand Gelbvieh. And of course there is also theranch’s iconic one-iron brand. First registeredin San Miguel County in 1875, it has been incontinuous use ever since.After more than a century in operation, theBell was carved into six tracts and parceled off after the end of the Second World War. But forWilliam Lane II, its legacy would have endedwith this dissolution. In 1970, the chairmanand chief executive of General BindingCorporation purchased the 130,000-acreheadquarters tract near the center of theMontoya Grant, and over the next six years hededicated himself to rebuilding the great ranch.Ultimately, he acquired a total of 290,100 acres,an astounding 44 percent of the original grant.Lane and his family also put in placeimprovements that dramatically enhancedbeef production. Seven large operating unitsare cordoned off by 342 miles of fence andconnected by 530 miles of interior roads.Ninety miles of pipeline water 206 stock tanksand 117 wells and windmills. The end resultis a world-class working cattle ranch that cansupport 5,000 animal units.
Sale of the Century 
In 2006, the Lane family began its quest tofind another steward for the Bell. Several leadingbrokerages marketed the property, includingMason and Morse Ranch Company and OrvisCushman & Wakefield. But the Great Recessiontook its toll. The original asking price of $110million was lowered to $99 million and then to$83 million in 2010 (not including livestock).The one constant throughout this process wasPatrick Bates of Bates Sanders Swan LandCompany, who was brought on to consult forthe Lane family in 2006; by 2010 he was thebroker of record. In March, Ron Morris of Ranch Marketing Associates contacted him.Like Bates, Morris is a veteran ranch brokerwith an impressive C.V. His client was noneother than John Malone, Liberty Media’s CEOand one of the most respected stewards of theland in Rockies. A new chapter in the history of the Bell was about to begin.
—Eric O’Keefe
20101970
   W   I   L   L   I   A   M   L   A   N   E   P   H   O   T   O   G   R   A   P   H   C   O   U   R   T   E   S   Y   O   F   T   H   E   L   A   N   E   F   A   M   I   L   Y   J   O   H   N   M   A   L   O   N   E   P   H   O   T   O   G   R   A   P   H   C   O   U   R   T   E   S   Y   B   Y   R   I   C   H   W   I   L   K   I   N   G    /   R   E   U   T   E   R   S
Bell Mountain William Lane IIJohn Malone
Liberty Media CEOJohn Malone bought the 290,100-acre BellRanch on August 17.Price and terms werenot disclosed on the$83-million listing.
1824
LANDREPORT.COM

Activity (3)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->