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Jenkins 120701 Dry HEPA Inadequate WTC

Jenkins 120701 Dry HEPA Inadequate WTC

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Published by EnviroCat
Cate Jenkins, Ph.D., 12/07/01, WTC asbestos in carpets, dry-type HEPA vacuums. EPA studies show wet carpet cleaning needed. EPA and NYC recommend ineffective dry High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) vacuums, along with wet rags and mops. Attached New York City Department of Health 9/16/01 “Recommendations for People Re-Occupying Commercial Buildings and Residents Re-Entering Their Homes.” Whistleblowing, whistleblower, World Trade Center (WTC), toxic aftermath, WTC dust, WTC toxics, cancer, respiratory, asthma, no safe level for asbestos, EPA cover-up, asbestos testing. Full title: “Adequacy of asbestos removal from carpets using dry-type HEPA vacuum cleaners.”
Cate Jenkins, Ph.D., 12/07/01, WTC asbestos in carpets, dry-type HEPA vacuums. EPA studies show wet carpet cleaning needed. EPA and NYC recommend ineffective dry High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) vacuums, along with wet rags and mops. Attached New York City Department of Health 9/16/01 “Recommendations for People Re-Occupying Commercial Buildings and Residents Re-Entering Their Homes.” Whistleblowing, whistleblower, World Trade Center (WTC), toxic aftermath, WTC dust, WTC toxics, cancer, respiratory, asthma, no safe level for asbestos, EPA cover-up, asbestos testing. Full title: “Adequacy of asbestos removal from carpets using dry-type HEPA vacuum cleaners.”

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Published by: EnviroCat on Dec 08, 2010
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12/08/2010

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UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460
 
OFFICE OFSOLID WASTE AND EMERGENCYRESPONSE
MEMORANDUMDATE:
December 7, 2001
SUBJECT:Adequacy of asbestos removal from carpetsusing dry-type HEPA vacuum cleanersFROM:
Cate Jenkins, Ph.D., Environmental ScientistWaste Identification Branch (MC 5304)Hazardous Waste Identification DivisionOffice of Solid Waste
TO:
Responsible Parties for Evaluating Asbestos Cleanup Proceduresin Buildings in Lower Manhattan after the World Trade Center CollapseThe EPA has conducted studies to determine whether or not the use of a standard dry high-efficiencyparticulate air (HEPA) filtered vacuum cleaner is effective in reducing the amount of asbestos in carpets.The EPA has found that dry-type HEPA vacuum cleaners were ineffective in reducing asbestosconcentrations in carpet under the experimental conditions. The wet-extraction vacuum cleaner with aHEPA filter, however, did significantly reduce asbestos concentrations.The studies also evaluated whether the use of a HEPA dry vacuum cleaner prevented increased airconcentrations because of the vacuuming activities which could stir up dusts. Dry-type HEPA vacuumcleaners had no significant effect on preventing asbestos air concentrations from increasing duringvacuuming. The ordinary vacuum cleaner with no HEPA filter, the dry-type vacuum cleaner with theHEPA filter, and even the wet-extraction vacuum cleaner with the HEPA filter all increased airconcentrations of asbestos during vacuuming.These studies are summarized below, and are available at the EPA publications web site fordownloading:
INCLUDES COPY of the 9/16/01 New York City recommendations to use wet mops, rags, brooms, dry HEPA vacuums for do-it-yourself cleaning of offices and residents around Ground Zero, saying it was not necessary to wear a common dustmask, much less an approved respirator, while cleaning offices and residences,
 
Evaluation of Two Cleaning Methods for Removal of Asbestos Fibers from Carpet
, US EPARisk Reduction Engineering Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH 45268, Publication No. EPA/600/S2-90/053, April, 1991, available at www.epa.gov/ncepihom/nepishom/ The effectiveness of dry-vacuuming and wet-cleaning for the removal of asbestos fibers fromcarpet was examined, and the potential for fiber reentrainment during carpet cleaning activitieswas evaluated. Routine carpet cleaning operations were simulated by using high-efficiencyparticulate air (HEPA) filtered dry vacuum cleaners and HEPA-filtered hot-water extractioncleaners on carpet artificially contaminated with asbestos fibers. Overall, wet-cleaning with a hotwater extraction cleaner reduced the level of asbestos contamination in the carpet byapproximately 70%. There was no significant change in carpet asbestos concentration after dry-vacuuming. The level of asbestos contamination had no significant effect on the differencebetween the asbestos concentrations before and after cleaning. Airborne asbestosconcentrations were two to four times greater during than before the carpet cleaning activities.Neither the level of asbestos contamination in the carpet nor the type of cleaning method usedgreatly affected the difference between the airbone asbestos concentration before and duringcleaning.
Evaluation of Three Cleaning Methods for Removing Asbestos from Carpet: Determinationof Airborne Asbestos Concentrations Associated with Each Method
, US EPA RiskReduction Engineering Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH 45268, EPA/600/SR-93/155, September 1993,,available at www.epa.gov/ncepihom/nepishom/ A study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of three cleaning methods for removal ofasbestos from contaminated carpet and to determine the airborne asbestos concentrationsassociated with each. Baseline measurements before cleaning showed an average concentrationof 1.6 billion asbestos structures per square foot (s/ft
2
) of carpet. The effectiveness of dryvacuuming using cleaners with and without a high-efficiency particulate air filter was comparedwith that of wet cleaning with a hot-water extraction cleaner. The wet cleaning method reducedthe level of asbestos contamination in the carpet by approximately 60%, whereas neither drycleaning method had any notable effect on the asbestos level. The type of cleaner used had littleeffect on the difference between the airborne asbestos concentration before and during cleaning.
I am aware that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has advised parties returning to residencesand homes in lower Manhattan to use these dry- type HEPA vacuums. This advice is by way of EPA’sofficial referral of parties to the New York City Department of Health (NYC DOH) recommendationswhich mention dry-type HEPA vacuums as being preferable. The NYC DOH recommendations may befound at www.ci.nyc.ny.us/html/doh/html/alerts/wtc3.html.EPA’s advice appears contrary to and in direct conflict with the official EPA studies which found thatdry-type HEPA vacuum cleaners do not reduce asbestos contamination in carpets. I am aware of noother scientific evidence to substantiate the conjecture that a dry-type HEPA vacuum cleaner wouldeffectively remove asbestos fibers from carpeting. There will be a need to closely monitor theeffectiveness of asbestos removal from carpeting through laboratory testing.This memorandum represents my personal professional judgement, and does not necessarily reflect anyof the different official positions of the EPA in this matter. My December 3, 2001 memorandumdetailed many other areas where EPA is in conflict with its own established scientifically basedregulations and guidelines regarding the World Trade Center asbestos cleanup.
 
New York City Department of HealthResponds to the World Trade Center Disaster
Recommendations for People Re-Occupying Commercial Buildingsand Residents Re-Entering Their Homes
What steps should I take upon returning to my workplace or home?
 If you were evacuated from a residence or workplace south of Warren Street, west of Broadway, and north of Exchange Street, and have been approved to resume tenancy by your building manager, you are advised to weara dust mask upon entering this area to decrease the possibility of dust inhalation and throat irritation. Outsidethese boundaries, masks are not necessary, but may be worn for your own comfort. If there is dust presentindoors, it should not be necessary to wear this mask if you follow the cleaning procedures detailed below.In a workplace, speak to your supervisor to see if there are special startup and cleaning procedure. In very dustyplaces, clean-up may be necessary before equipment can be restarted. Follow the cleaning procedures discussedbelow.In your home, you should first make sure that conditions are safe. You should enter your home dressed in a longsleeve shirt and pants, and with closed shoes. Upon entry:Check for the smell of gas. If the apartment smells of gas, leave immediately and report it to your buildingmanager and to Con Edison.Check for broken glass and fixtures. Wrap any broken glass in paper and mark it “broken glass.” If largepieces of glass are broken, ask your building superintendent for instructions on disposal.Run hot and cold water from each of the taps for at least two minutes, or until water runs completely clean.Flush toilets until bowls are refilled. For air pressure systems, you may need to flush several times. If thereare any problems with the toilet or plumbing system, call a plumber -- do not try to fix the problemyourself.Follow the cleaning procedures discussed below.
 I have heard that asbestos was released from the collapse of the World Trade Center. What are the healtheffects of asbestos?
 Because some asbestos was used in the building of the World Trade Center, City, State, and Federal agencieshave been collecting dust, debris, and air samples since the World Trade Center collapse. As expected, someasbestos was found in a few of the dust and debris samples taken from the blast site and individuals working inthis area have been advised to take precautions. However, most of the air samples taken have been below levelsof concern. Based on the asbestos test results received thus far, there are no significant health risks to occupantsin the affected area or to the general public.In general, asbestos-related lung disease results only from intense asbestos exposure experienced over a periodof many years, primarily as a consequence of occupational exposures. The risk of developing anasbestos-related illness following an exposure of short duration, even to high levels, is extremely low.
What should I do with food left in my apartment?
 
1 of 21/22/02 6:03 PMYC DOH - Recommendations for People Re-Oc...ings and Residents Re-Entering Their Homeshttp://www.ci.nyc.ny.us/html/doh/html/alerts/wtc3.html
THE ORIGINAL WEBSITE POSTING IS UNAVAILABLE, BUT THIS DOCUMENT CAN STILL BE FOUND AT THE "WWW.ARCHIVE.ORG" SITE AT:
http://web.archive.org/web/20011111024046/http://www.ci.nyc.ny.us/html/doh/html/alerts/wtc3.html 

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