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Case study: Southern Cities Heatwaves: Report

Case study: Southern Cities Heatwaves: Report

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Published by nccarf
Case study: Southern Cities Heatwaves: Impacts and adaptation response of infrastructure and communities to heatwaves: the southern Australian experience of 2009
http://www.nccarf.edu.au/node/481

The goal of the study is to detail the impact, vulnerability, and adaptation responses to the heatwave of 2009 at state and sub-regional/local government levels in southern Australian with an emphasis on Victoria and South Australia.
Case study: Southern Cities Heatwaves: Impacts and adaptation response of infrastructure and communities to heatwaves: the southern Australian experience of 2009
http://www.nccarf.edu.au/node/481

The goal of the study is to detail the impact, vulnerability, and adaptation responses to the heatwave of 2009 at state and sub-regional/local government levels in southern Australian with an emphasis on Victoria and South Australia.

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: nccarf on Dec 09, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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12/09/2010

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Impacts and adaptation responseof infrastructure and communitiesto heatwaves: The southern Australian experienceof 2009
Case studies of extreme events
Image: John Goodridge
 
Published by the National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF)ISBN: 978-1-921609-15-2NCCARF Publication 13/10© Copyright National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility 2010
Please cite this report as:
Queensland University of Technology 2010.
 Impacts and adaptation response of infrastructure and communities to heatwaves: the southern Australian experience of 2009
. Report for the National Climate ChangeAdaptation Research Facility, Gold Coast, Australia.
Author contact details
Enquiries should be addressed to:Mr Jim ReevesInstitute for Sustainable Resources, Queensland University of Technology,Gardens Point Campus, Brisbane, Queensland 4001T: +61 7 3138 7656Email: jim.reeves@qut.edu.au
Contributing Authors
 Institute for Sustainable Resources, Queensland University of Technology
Jim Reeves, Colleen Foelz, Peter Grace and Peter Best
 Australian Centre for Sustainable Catchments, University of Southern Queensland 
Peter Best, Torben Marcussen, Shahbaz Mushtaq and Roger Stone
School of Geography and Environmental Science, Monash University
Margaret Loughnan
Climate Change Adaptation program, RMIT University
Darryn McEvoy, Ifte Ahmed and Jane Mullett
 Risk Frontiers, Macquarie University
Katharine Haynes, Deanne Bird, Lucinda Coates and Megan Ling
Disclaimer
This report has been prepared on behalf of and for the exclusive use of the National Climate Change AdaptationResearch Facility (NCCARF), and is subject to and issued in connection with the provisions of the agreementbetween Institute for Sustainable Resources, Queensland University of Technology and NCCARF. Institute forSustainable Resources, Queensland University of Technology accepts no liability or responsibility whatsoeverfor or in respect of any use of or reliance upon this report by any third party.This work was supported financially by the Australian Government and the partners in the NCCARFconsortium. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the Commonwealth and the Commonwealth doesnot accept responsibility for information or advice contained within.
 
Preface
The National Climate Change Research Facility (NCCARF) is undertaking a program of Synthesis and Integrative Research to synthesise existing and emerging national andinternational research on climate change impacts and adaptation. The purpose of this programis to provide decision-makers with information they need to manage the risks of climatechange.This report on Heatwaves: The southern Australian experience of 2009 forms part of a seriesof studies/reports commissioned by NCCARF that look at historical extreme weather events,their impacts and subsequent adaptations. These studies examine particular events – primarilyextremes – and seek to explore prior vulnerabilities and resilience, the character andmanagement of the event, subsequent adaptation, and the effects on present-day vulnerability.The reports should inform thinking about adapting to climate change, i.e. capacity to adapt,barriers to adaptation, and translating capacity into action. While it is recognised that thecomparison is not and never can be exact, the overarching goal is to better understand therequirements of successful adaptation to future climate change.This report highlights the southeastern Australia heatwave of 2009. During the summer of 2009, southeastern Australia experienced an extreme heatwave between 27 January and 8February. In the context of previous heatwaves, the event registered as one of the nation‘smost severe episodes of high temperatures over an extended period of time. As many as 500people died as a result of the 2009 heatwave in Adelaide and Melbourne. Financial losses,mainly as a consequence of power outages, transport service disruptions and response costs,have been estimated at $800 million. Governments, councils, hospitals and emergencyresponse organisations and the community were largely under-prepared for a heatwave of thismagnitude.Other reports in the series are:
 
Cyclone Tracy
 
East Coast Lows and the Newcastle-Central Coast Pasha Bulker storm
 
The 2008 Floods in Queensland: Charleville and Mackay
 
Storm tides along east-coast Australia
 
Drought and the Future of Rural Communities: Drought impacts and adaptation inregional Victoria, Australia
 
Drought and water security: Kalgoorlie and Broken HillTo highlight common learnings from all the case studies, a Synthesis Report has beenproduced which is a summary of responses and lessons learned.All reports are available from the website atwww.nccarf.edu.au.

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