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The Witness House | TOC and Excerpt

The Witness House | TOC and Excerpt

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Published by otherpress
Autumn 1945 saw the start of the Nuremberg trials, in which high ranking representatives of the Nazi government were called to account for their war crimes. In a curious yet fascinating twist, witnesses for the prosecution and the defense were housed together in a villa on the outskirts of town. In this so-called Witness House, perpetrators and victims confronted each other in a microcosm that reflected the events of the high court. Presiding over the affair was the beautiful Countess Ingeborg Kálnoky (a woman so blond and enticing that she was described as a Jean Harlowe look-alike) who took great pride in her ability to keep the household civil and the communal dinners pleasant. A comedy of manners arose among the guests as the urge to continue battle was checked by a sudden and uncomfortable return to civilized life.
The trial atmosphere extends to the small group in the villa. Agitated victims confront and avoid perpetrators and sympathizers, and high-ranking officers in the German armed forces struggle to keep their composure. This highly explosive mixture is seasoned with vivid, often humorous, anecdotes of those who had basked in the glory of the inner circles of power. Christiane Kohl focuses on the guilty, the sympathizers, the undecided, and those who always manage to make themselves fit in. The Witness House reveals the social structures that allowed a cruel and unjust regime to flourish and serves as a symbol of the blurred boundaries between accuser and accused that would come to form the basis of postwar Germany.

Click here to buy: http://www.otherpress.com/books/book?ean=9781590513798
Autumn 1945 saw the start of the Nuremberg trials, in which high ranking representatives of the Nazi government were called to account for their war crimes. In a curious yet fascinating twist, witnesses for the prosecution and the defense were housed together in a villa on the outskirts of town. In this so-called Witness House, perpetrators and victims confronted each other in a microcosm that reflected the events of the high court. Presiding over the affair was the beautiful Countess Ingeborg Kálnoky (a woman so blond and enticing that she was described as a Jean Harlowe look-alike) who took great pride in her ability to keep the household civil and the communal dinners pleasant. A comedy of manners arose among the guests as the urge to continue battle was checked by a sudden and uncomfortable return to civilized life.
The trial atmosphere extends to the small group in the villa. Agitated victims confront and avoid perpetrators and sympathizers, and high-ranking officers in the German armed forces struggle to keep their composure. This highly explosive mixture is seasoned with vivid, often humorous, anecdotes of those who had basked in the glory of the inner circles of power. Christiane Kohl focuses on the guilty, the sympathizers, the undecided, and those who always manage to make themselves fit in. The Witness House reveals the social structures that allowed a cruel and unjust regime to flourish and serves as a symbol of the blurred boundaries between accuser and accused that would come to form the basis of postwar Germany.

Click here to buy: http://www.otherpress.com/books/book?ean=9781590513798

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Published by: otherpress on Dec 10, 2010
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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09/29/2013

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TheWiTnesshouse
Nazis and Holocaust SurvivorsSharing a Villa During the Nuremberg Trials
ChrisTiane Kohl
 Translated by Anthea Bell
oTher Press
New York
 
Translation copyright © 2010 Anthea BellCopyright © 2005 by Wilhelm Goldmann VerlagA division of Verlagsgruppe Random House GmbH, Munich,GermanyOriginally published in German as
Das Zeugenhaus.Nürnberg 1945: Als Täter und Opfer unter einem Dachzusammentrafen
,
 
by Christiane Kohl.Production Editor:
Yvonne E. Cárdenas
Text Designer:
Simon M. Sullivan
This book was set in 10.25 pt Sabon by Alpha Design &Composition of Pittseld, NH.10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1All rights reserved. No part of this publication may bereproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means,electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording,or by any information storage and retrieval system, withoutwritten permission from Other Press LLC, except in the caseof brief quotations in reviews for inclusion in a magazine,newspaper, or broadcast. Printed in the United States of Americaon acid-free paper. For information write to Other Press LLC,2 Park Avenue, 24th Floor, New York, NY 10016. Or visit ourWeb site: www.otherpress.comLibrary of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication DataKohl, Christiane, 1954–[Zeugenhaus. English]The witness house : nazis and holocaust survivors sharing a villaduring the nuremberg trials / By Christiane Kohl ; Translated byAnthea Bell.p. cm.Includes bibliographical references and index.
isbn
978-1-59051-379-8 (pbk. original with aps)
isbn
978-1-59051-380-4 (e-book) 1. Nuremberg Trial of MajorGerman War Criminals, Nuremberg, Germany, 1945–1946.2. Nuremberg War Crime Trials, Nuremberg, Germany,1946–1949. 3. Kálnoky, Ingeborg. 4. Witnesses—Germany—Nuremberg—Biography. 5. Boardinghouses—GermanyNuremberg—History—20th century. I. Title.
kz
1176.5.
k
6613 2010341.6'90268—dc222010011435

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