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WIKILEAKS - LEAKS TO THE PRESS OF CLASSIFIED INFORMATION RARELY PROSECUTED

WIKILEAKS - LEAKS TO THE PRESS OF CLASSIFIED INFORMATION RARELY PROSECUTED

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1,946 |Likes:
Published by 83jjmack
classified information is rarely prosecuted if leaked to the press. this contains some potential criminal statutes which MAY apply

NEWSCORE

Last Updated: 5:53 PM, December 5, 2010

Posted: 1:09 PM, December 5, 2010
Comments: 102
More Print

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has circulated across the internet an encrypted “poison pill” cache of uncensored documents suspected to include files on BP and Guantanamo Bay.

One of the files identified this weekend by The (London) Sunday Times — called the “insurance” file -- has been downloaded from the WikiLeaks website by tens of thousands of supporters, from America to Australia.

Assange warns that any government that tries to curtail his activities risks triggering a new deluge of state and commercial secrets.

The military papers on Guantanamo Bay, yet to be published, believed to have been supplied by Bradley Manning, who was arrested in May. Other documents that Assange is confirmed to possess include an aerial video of a US airstrike in Afghanistan that killed civilians, BP files and Bank of America documents.
Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has circulated an encrypted 'poison pill' of uncensored documents, and will release them if he's arrested.
AFP/Getty Images
Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has circulated an encrypted "poison pill" of uncensored documents, and will release them if he's arrested.

One of the key files available for download -- named insurance.aes256 -- appears to be encrypted with a 256-digit key. Experts said last week it was virtually unbreakable.

Assange has warned he can divulge the classified documents in the insurance file and similar backups if he is detained or the WikiLeaks website is permanently removed from the internet. He has suggested the contents are unredacted, posing a possible security risk for coalition partners around the world.

Assange warned: “We have over a long period of time distributed encrypted backups of material we have yet to release. All we have to do is release the password to that material, and it is instantly available.”

The “doomsday files” are part of a contingency plan drawn up by Assange and his supporters as they face a legal threat. He is wanted in Sweden over sexual assault allegations, and the US is reviewing the possibility of legal action after the release of 250,000 diplomatic cables.

Ben Laurie, a London-based computer security expert who has advised WikiLeaks, said: “Julian’s a smart guy and this is an interesting tactic. He will hope it deters anyone from acting against him.”

Nigel Smart, professor of cryptology at Bristol University, said even powerful military computers would be unable to crack the encryption. He said: “This isn’t something that can be broken with a modern computer. You need the key to open it.”

The file is 1.4 gigabytes in size, which would be big enough for a compressed version of all the files released this year and additional data.


Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/international/wikileaks_assange_will_release_encrypted_TMdRdOm0JfvW4Z9rjWwLQO#ixzz17qdOotXC
classified information is rarely prosecuted if leaked to the press. this contains some potential criminal statutes which MAY apply

NEWSCORE

Last Updated: 5:53 PM, December 5, 2010

Posted: 1:09 PM, December 5, 2010
Comments: 102
More Print

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has circulated across the internet an encrypted “poison pill” cache of uncensored documents suspected to include files on BP and Guantanamo Bay.

One of the files identified this weekend by The (London) Sunday Times — called the “insurance” file -- has been downloaded from the WikiLeaks website by tens of thousands of supporters, from America to Australia.

Assange warns that any government that tries to curtail his activities risks triggering a new deluge of state and commercial secrets.

The military papers on Guantanamo Bay, yet to be published, believed to have been supplied by Bradley Manning, who was arrested in May. Other documents that Assange is confirmed to possess include an aerial video of a US airstrike in Afghanistan that killed civilians, BP files and Bank of America documents.
Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has circulated an encrypted 'poison pill' of uncensored documents, and will release them if he's arrested.
AFP/Getty Images
Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has circulated an encrypted "poison pill" of uncensored documents, and will release them if he's arrested.

One of the key files available for download -- named insurance.aes256 -- appears to be encrypted with a 256-digit key. Experts said last week it was virtually unbreakable.

Assange has warned he can divulge the classified documents in the insurance file and similar backups if he is detained or the WikiLeaks website is permanently removed from the internet. He has suggested the contents are unredacted, posing a possible security risk for coalition partners around the world.

Assange warned: “We have over a long period of time distributed encrypted backups of material we have yet to release. All we have to do is release the password to that material, and it is instantly available.”

The “doomsday files” are part of a contingency plan drawn up by Assange and his supporters as they face a legal threat. He is wanted in Sweden over sexual assault allegations, and the US is reviewing the possibility of legal action after the release of 250,000 diplomatic cables.

Ben Laurie, a London-based computer security expert who has advised WikiLeaks, said: “Julian’s a smart guy and this is an interesting tactic. He will hope it deters anyone from acting against him.”

Nigel Smart, professor of cryptology at Bristol University, said even powerful military computers would be unable to crack the encryption. He said: “This isn’t something that can be broken with a modern computer. You need the key to open it.”

The file is 1.4 gigabytes in size, which would be big enough for a compressed version of all the files released this year and additional data.


Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/international/wikileaks_assange_will_release_encrypted_TMdRdOm0JfvW4Z9rjWwLQO#ixzz17qdOotXC

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Published by: 83jjmack on Dec 11, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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04/22/2013

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CRS Report for Congress
Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress
Criminal Prohibitions on the Publication ofClassified Defense Information
Jennifer K. Elsea
Legislative AttorneyDecember 6, 2010
Congressional Research Service
7-5700www.crs.govR41404
 
Criminal Prohibitions on the Publication of Classified Defense InformationCongressional Research Service
Summary
The recent online publication of classified defense documents and diplomatic cables by theorganization WikiLeaks and subsequent reporting by the
 New York Times
and other news mediahave focused attention on whether such publication violates U.S. criminal law. The AttorneyGeneral has reportedly stated that the Justice Department and Department of Defense areinvestigating the circumstances to determine whether any prosecutions will be undertaken inconnection with the disclosure.This report identifies some criminal statutes that may apply, but notes that these have been usedalmost exclusively to prosecute individuals with access to classified information (and acorresponding obligation to protect it) who make it available to foreign agents, or to foreignagents who obtain classified information unlawfully while present in the United States. Leaks of classified information to the press have only rarely been punished as crimes, and we are aware of no case in which a publisher of information obtained through unauthorized disclosure by agovernment employee has been prosecuted for publishing it. There may be First Amendmentimplications that would make such a prosecution difficult, not to mention political ramificationsbased on concerns about government censorship. To the extent that the investigation implicatesany foreign nationals whose conduct occurred entirely overseas, any resulting prosecution maycarry foreign policy implications related to the exercise of extraterritorial jurisdiction and whethersuspected persons may be extradited to the United States under applicable treaty provisions.This report will discuss the statutory prohibitions that may be implicated, including the EspionageAct; the extraterritorial application of such statutes; and the First Amendment implications relatedto such prosecutions against domestic or foreign media organizations and associated individuals.The report will also provide a summary of pending legislation relevant to the issue, including S.4004.
 
Criminal Prohibitions on the Publication of Classified Defense InformationCongressional Research Service
Contents
Background................................................................................................................................1
 
Statutory Protection of Classified Information.............................................................................4
 
The Espionage Act................................................................................................................4
 
Other Statutes.......................................................................................................................7
 
Analysis................................................................................................................................8
 
Jurisdictional Reach of Relevant Statutes....................................................................................9
 
Extradition Issues......................................................................................................................11
 
Constitutional Issues.................................................................................................................14
 
Proposed Legislation.................................................................................................................20
 
Conclusion................................................................................................................................21
 
Contacts
Author Contact Information......................................................................................................21
 

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